Speeches (Lines) for Cardinal Wolsey
in "Henry VIII"

Total: 79

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,174

The Duke of Buckingham's surveyor, ha?
Where's his examination?

2

I,1,177

Is he in person ready?

3

I,1,179

Well, we shall then know more; and Buckingham
Shall lessen this big look.

4

I,2,365

Please you, sir,
I know but of a single part, in aught...

5

I,2,398

And for me,
I have no further gone in this than by...

6

I,2,434

A word with you.
[To the Secretary]...

7

I,2,465

Stand forth, and with bold spirit relate what you,
Most like a careful subject, have collected...

8

I,2,476

Please your highness, note
This dangerous conception in this point....

9

I,2,551

Now, madam, may his highness live in freedom,
and this man out of prison?

10

I,4,703

You're welcome, my fair guests: that noble lady,
Or gentleman, that is not freely merry,...

11

I,4,711

My Lord Sands,
I am beholding to you: cheer your neighbours....

12

I,4,726

What's that?

13

I,4,729

What warlike voice,
And to what end is this? Nay, ladies, fear not;...

14

I,4,738

Good lord chamberlain,
Go, give 'em welcome; you can speak the French tongue;...

15

I,4,760

Say, lord chamberlain,
They have done my poor house grace; for which I pay 'em...

16

I,4,768

My lord!

17

I,4,770

Pray, tell 'em thus much from me:
There should be one amongst 'em, by his person,...

18

I,4,777

What say they?

19

I,4,781

Let me see, then.
By all your good leaves, gentlemen; here I'll make...

20

I,4,789

I am glad
Your grace is grown so pleasant.

21

I,4,799

Sir Thomas Lovell, is the banquet ready
I' the privy chamber?

22

I,4,802

Your grace,
I fear, with dancing is a little heated.

23

I,4,805

There's fresher air, my lord,
In the next chamber.

24

II,2,1115

Sir, you cannot.
I would your grace would give us but an hour...

25

II,2,1129

Your grace has given a precedent of wisdom
Above all princes, in committing freely...

26

II,2,1153

I know your majesty has always loved her
So dear in heart, not to deny her that...

27

II,2,1163

[Aside to GARDINER] Give me your hand much joy and
favour to you;...

28

II,2,1173

Yes, he was.

29

II,2,1175

Yes, surely.

30

II,2,1178

How! of me?

31

II,2,1183

Heaven's peace be with him!
That's Christian care enough: for living murmurers...

32

II,4,1354

Whilst our commission from Rome is read,
Let silence be commanded.

33

II,4,1360

Be't so. Proceed.

34

II,4,1414

You have here, lady,
And of your choice, these reverend fathers; men...

35

II,4,1429

Your pleasure, madam?

36

II,4,1435

Be patient yet.

37

II,4,1447

I do profess
You speak not like yourself; who ever yet...

38

II,4,1513

Most gracious sir,
In humblest manner I require your highness,...

39

III,1,1650

Peace to your highness!

40

III,1,1654

May it please you noble madam, to withdraw
Into your private chamber, we shall give you...

41

III,1,1668

Tanta est erga te mentis integritas, regina
serenissima,—

42

III,1,1680

Noble lady,
I am sorry my integrity should breed,...

43

III,1,1713

Madam, you wrong the king's love with these fears:
Your hopes and friends are infinite.

44

III,1,1733

He tells you rightly.

45

III,1,1749

Madam, this is a mere distraction;
You turn the good we offer into envy.

46

III,1,1777

Madam, you wander from the good we aim at.

47

III,1,1782

Pray, hear me.

48

III,1,1794

If your grace
Could but be brought to know our ends are honest,...

49

III,2,1929

The packet, Cromwell.
Gave't you the king?

50

III,2,1932

Look'd he o' the inside of the paper?

51

III,2,1938

Is he ready
To come abroad?

52

III,2,1941

Leave me awhile.
[Exit CROMWELL]...

53

III,2,1955

[Aside] The late queen's gentlewoman,
a knight's daughter,...

54

III,2,2007

Heaven forgive me!
Ever God bless your highness!

55

III,2,2017

Sir,
For holy offices I have a time; a time...

56

III,2,2025

And ever may your highness yoke together,
As I will lend you cause, my doing well...

57

III,2,2037

[Aside] What should this mean?

58

III,2,2044

My sovereign, I confess your royal graces,
Shower'd on me daily, have been more than could...

59

III,2,2070

I do profess
That for your highness' good I ever labour'd...

60

III,2,2088

What should this mean?
What sudden anger's this? how have I reap'd it?...

61

III,2,2120

Stay:
Where's your commission, lords? words cannot carry...

62

III,2,2125

Till I find more than will or words to do it,
I mean your malice, know, officious lords,...

63

III,2,2141

It must be himself, then.

64

III,2,2143

Proud lord, thou liest:
Within these forty hours Surrey durst better...

65

III,2,2157

This, and all else
This talking lord can lay upon my credit,...

66

III,2,2178

All goodness
Is poison to thy stomach.

67

III,2,2194

How much, methinks, I could despise this man,
But that I am bound in charity against it!

68

III,2,2198

So much fairer
And spotless shall mine innocence arise,...

69

III,2,2206

Speak on, sir;
I dare your worst objections: if I blush,...

70

III,2,2254

So farewell to the little good you bear me.
Farewell! a long farewell, to all my greatness!...

71

III,2,2280

What, amazed
At my misfortunes? can thy spirit wonder...

72

III,2,2285

Why, well;
Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell....

73

III,2,2296

I hope I have: I am able now, methinks,
Out of a fortitude of soul I feel,...

74

III,2,2303

God bless him!

75

III,2,2306

That's somewhat sudden:
But he's a learned man. May he continue...

76

III,2,2314

That's news indeed.

77

III,2,2320

There was the weight that pull'd me down. O Cromwell,
The king has gone beyond me: all my glories...

78

III,2,2342

Cromwell, I did not think to shed a tear
In all my miseries; but thou hast forced me,...

79

III,2,2374

So I have. Farewell
The hopes of court! my hopes in heaven do dwell.

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