Speeches (Lines) for Widow
in "All's Well That Ends Well"

Total: 21

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

III,5,1607

Nay, come; for if they do approach the city, we
shall lose all the sight.

2

III,5,1610

It is reported that he has taken their greatest
commander; and that with his own hand he slew the
duke's brother.
[Tucket]
We have lost our labour; they are gone a contrary
way: hark! you may know by their trumpets.

3

III,5,1620

I have told my neighbour how you have been solicited
by a gentleman his companion.

4

III,5,1636

I hope so.
[Enter HELENA, disguised like a Pilgrim]
Look, here comes a pilgrim: I know she will lie at
my house; thither they send one another: I'll
question her. God save you, pilgrim! whither are you bound?

5

III,5,1643

At the Saint Francis here beside the port.

6

III,5,1645

Ay, marry, is't.
[A march afar]
Hark you! they come this way.
If you will tarry, holy pilgrim,
But till the troops come by,
I will conduct you where you shall be lodged;
The rather, for I think I know your hostess
As ample as myself.

7

III,5,1654

If you shall please so, pilgrim.

8

III,5,1656

You came, I think, from France?

9

III,5,1658

Here you shall see a countryman of yours
That has done worthy service.

10

III,5,1682

I warrant, good creature, wheresoe'er she is,
Her heart weighs sadly: this young maid might do her
A shrewd turn, if she pleased.

11

III,5,1688

He does indeed;
And brokes with all that can in such a suit
Corrupt the tender honour of a maid:
But she is arm'd for him and keeps her guard
In honestest defence.

12

III,5,1694

So, now they come:
[Drum and Colours]
[Enter BERTRAM, PAROLLES, and the whole army]
That is Antonio, the duke's eldest son;
That, Escalus.

13

III,5,1713

Marry, hang you!

14

III,5,1716

The troop is past. Come, pilgrim, I will bring you
Where you shall host: of enjoin'd penitents
There's four or five, to great Saint Jaques bound,
Already at my house.

15

III,7,1850

Though my estate be fallen, I was well born,
Nothing acquainted with these businesses;
And would not put my reputation now
In any staining act.

16

III,7,1860

I should believe you:
For you have show'd me that which well approves
You're great in fortune.

17

III,7,1878

Now I see
The bottom of your purpose.

18

III,7,1887

I have yielded:
Instruct my daughter how she shall persever,
That time and place with this deceit so lawful
May prove coherent. Every night he comes
With musics of all sorts and songs composed
To her unworthiness: it nothing steads us
To chide him from our eaves; for he persists
As if his life lay on't.

19

IV,4,2437

Gentle madam,
You never had a servant to whose trust
Your business was more welcome.

20

V,1,2594

Lord, how we lose our pains!

21

V,3,2862

I am her mother, sir, whose age and honour
Both suffer under this complaint we bring,
And both shall cease, without your remedy.

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