Speeches (Lines) for Troilus
in "Troilus and Cressida"

Total: 131

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,33

Call here my varlet; I'll unarm again:
Why should I war without the walls of Troy,...

2

I,1,39

The Greeks are strong and skilful to their strength,
Fierce to their skill and to their fierceness valiant;...

3

I,1,48

Have I not tarried?

4

I,1,51

Have I not tarried?

5

I,1,53

Still have I tarried.

6

I,1,58

Patience herself, what goddess e'er she be,
Doth lesser blench at sufferance than I do....

7

I,1,65

I was about to tell thee:—when my heart,
As wedged with a sigh, would rive in twain,...

8

I,1,78

O Pandarus! I tell thee, Pandarus,—
When I do tell thee, there my hopes lie drown'd,...

9

I,1,95

Thou dost not speak so much.

10

I,1,99

Good Pandarus, how now, Pandarus!

11

I,1,103

What, art thou angry, Pandarus? what, with me?

12

I,1,108

Say I she is not fair?

13

I,1,113

Pandarus,—

14

I,1,115

Sweet Pandarus,—

15

I,1,119

Peace, you ungracious clamours! peace, rude sounds!
Fools on both sides! Helen must needs be fair,...

16

I,1,137

Because not there: this woman's answer sorts,
For womanish it is to be from thence....

17

I,1,141

By whom, AEneas?

18

I,1,143

Let Paris bleed; 'tis but a scar to scorn;
Paris is gored with Menelaus' horn.

19

I,1,147

Better at home, if 'would I might' were 'may.'
But to the sport abroad: are you bound thither?

20

I,1,150

Come, go we then together.

21

II,2,1015

Fie, fie, my brother!
Weigh you the worth and honour of a king...

22

II,2,1027

You are for dreams and slumbers, brother priest;
You fur your gloves with reason. Here are...

23

II,2,1045

What is aught, but as 'tis valued?

24

II,2,1054

I take to-day a wife, and my election
Is led on in the conduct of my will;...

25

II,2,1092

'Tis our mad sister, I do know her voice.

26

II,2,1115

Why, brother Hector,
We may not think the justness of each act...

27

II,2,1192

Why, there you touch'd the life of our design:
Were it not glory that we more affected...

28

III,2,1654

Sirrah, walk off.

29

III,2,1657

No, Pandarus: I stalk about her door,
Like a strange soul upon the Stygian banks...

30

III,2,1667

I am giddy; expectation whirls me round.
The imaginary relish is so sweet...

31

III,2,1687

Even such a passion doth embrace my bosom:
My heart beats thicker than a feverous pulse;...

32

III,2,1707

You have bereft me of all words, lady.

33

III,2,1715

O Cressida, how often have I wished me thus!

34

III,2,1717

What should they grant? what makes this pretty
abruption? What too curious dreg espies my sweet...

35

III,2,1721

Fears make devils of cherubims; they never see truly.

36

III,2,1725

O, let my lady apprehend no fear: in all Cupid's
pageant there is presented no monster.

37

III,2,1728

Nothing, but our undertakings; when we vow to weep
seas, live in fire, eat rocks, tame tigers; thinking...

38

III,2,1741

Are there such? such are not we: praise us as we
are tasted, allow us as we prove; our head shall go...

39

III,2,1757

You know now your hostages; your uncle's word and my
firm faith.

40

III,2,1766

Why was my Cressid then so hard to win?

41

III,2,1784

And shall, albeit sweet music issues thence.

42

III,2,1790

Your leave, sweet Cressid!

43

III,2,1793

What offends you, lady?

44

III,2,1795

You cannot shun Yourself.

45

III,2,1801

Well know they what they speak that speak so wisely.

46

III,2,1807

O that I thought it could be in a woman—
As, if it can, I will presume in you—...

47

III,2,1821

O virtuous fight,
When right with right wars who shall be most right!...

48

III,2,1856

Amen.

49

IV,2,2286

Dear, trouble not yourself: the morn is cold.

50

IV,2,2289

Trouble him not;
To bed, to bed: sleep kill those pretty eyes,...

51

IV,2,2294

I prithee now, to bed.

52

IV,2,2296

O Cressida! but that the busy day,
Waked by the lark, hath roused the ribald crows,...

53

IV,2,2301

Beshrew the witch! with venomous wights she stays
As tediously as hell, but flies the grasps of love...

54

IV,2,2311

It is your uncle.

55

IV,2,2331

Ha, ha!

56

IV,2,2355

How now! what's the matter?

57

IV,2,2364

Is it so concluded?

58

IV,2,2367

How my achievements mock me!
I will go meet them: and, my Lord AEneas,...

59

IV,3,2416

Walk into her house;
I'll bring her to the Grecian presently:...

60

IV,4,2452

Cressid, I love thee in so strain'd a purity,
That the bless'd gods, as angry with my fancy,...

61

IV,4,2459

A hateful truth.

62

IV,4,2461

From Troy and Troilus.

63

IV,4,2463

And suddenly; where injury of chance
Puts back leave-taking, justles roughly by...

64

IV,4,2480

Hark! you are call'd: some say the Genius so
Cries 'come' to him that instantly must die....

65

IV,4,2487

No remedy.

66

IV,4,2490

Hear me, my love: be thou but true of heart,—

67

IV,4,2492

Nay, we must use expostulation kindly,
For it is parting from us:...

68

IV,4,2502

And I'll grow friend with danger. Wear this sleeve.

69

IV,4,2504

I will corrupt the Grecian sentinels,
To give thee nightly visitation....

70

IV,4,2508

Hear while I speak it, love:
The Grecian youths are full of quality;...

71

IV,4,2517

Die I a villain, then!
In this I do not call your faith in question...

72

IV,4,2527

No.
But something may be done that we will not:...

73

IV,4,2533

Come, kiss; and let us part.

74

IV,4,2535

Good brother, come you hither;
And bring AEneas and the Grecian with you.

75

IV,4,2538

Who, I? alas, it is my vice, my fault:
Whiles others fish with craft for great opinion,...

76

IV,4,2560

Grecian, thou dost not use me courteously,
To shame the zeal of my petition to thee...

77

IV,4,2576

Come, to the port. I'll tell thee, Diomed,
This brave shall oft make thee to hide thy head....

78

IV,5,2731

Hector, thou sleep'st;
Awake thee!

79

IV,5,2910

My Lord Ulysses, tell me, I beseech you,
In what place of the field doth Calchas keep?

80

IV,5,2917

Shall sweet lord, be bound to you so much,
After we part from Agamemnon's tent,...

81

IV,5,2924

O, sir, to such as boasting show their scars
A mock is due. Will you walk on, my lord?...

82

V,1,3028

Sweet sir, you honour me.

83

V,2,3054

Cressid comes forth to him.

84

V,2,3058

Yea, so familiar!

85

V,2,3066

What should she remember?

86

V,2,3079

Hold, patience!

87

V,2,3083

Thy better must.

88

V,2,3085

O plague and madness!

89

V,2,3090

Behold, I pray you!

90

V,2,3093

I pray thee, stay.

91

V,2,3095

I pray you, stay; by hell and all hell's torments
I will not speak a word!

92

V,2,3099

Doth that grieve thee?
O wither'd truth!

93

V,2,3102

By Jove,
I will be patient.

94

V,2,3109

She strokes his cheek!

95

V,2,3111

Nay, stay; by Jove, I will not speak a word:
There is between my will and all offences...

96

V,2,3122

Fear me not, sweet lord;
I will not be myself, nor have cognition...

97

V,2,3128

O beauty! where is thy faith?

98

V,2,3130

I will be patient; outwardly I will.

99

V,2,3148

I did swear patience.

100

V,2,3161

Wert thou the devil, and worest it on thy horn,
It should be challenged.

101

V,2,3186

It is.

102

V,2,3188

To make a recordation to my soul
Of every syllable that here was spoke....

103

V,2,3199

She was not, sure.

104

V,2,3201

Why, my negation hath no taste of madness.

105

V,2,3203

Let it not be believed for womanhood!
Think, we had mothers; do not give advantage...

106

V,2,3209

Nothing at all, unless that this were she.

107

V,2,3211

This she? no, this is Diomed's Cressida:
If beauty have a soul, this is not she;...

108

V,2,3237

Ay, Greek; and that shall be divulged well
In characters as red as Mars his heart...

109

V,2,3252

O Cressid! O false Cressid! false, false, false!
Let all untruths stand by thy stained name,...

110

V,2,3261

Have with you, prince. My courteous lord, adieu.
Farewell, revolted fair! and, Diomed,...

111

V,2,3265

Accept distracted thanks.

112

V,3,3318

Brother, you have a vice of mercy in you,
Which better fits a lion than a man.

113

V,3,3321

When many times the captive Grecian falls,
Even in the fan and wind of your fair sword,...

114

V,3,3325

Fool's play, by heaven, Hector.

115

V,3,3327

For the love of all the gods,
Let's leave the hermit pity with our mothers,...

116

V,3,3333

Hector, then 'tis wars.

117

V,3,3335

Who should withhold me?
Not fate, obedience, nor the hand of Mars...

118

V,3,3369

This foolish, dreaming, superstitious girl
Makes all these bodements.

119

V,3,3379

Away! away!

120

V,3,3388

They are at it, hark! Proud Diomed, believe,
I come to lose my arm, or win my sleeve.

121

V,3,3392

What now?

122

V,3,3394

Let me read.

123

V,3,3402

Words, words, mere words, no matter from the heart:
The effect doth operate another way....

124

V,4,3429

Fly not; for shouldst thou take the river Styx,
I would swim after.

125

V,6,3520

O traitor Diomed! turn thy false face, thou traitor,
And pay thy life thou owest me for my horse!

126

V,6,3525

Come, both you cogging Greeks; have at you both!

127

V,6,3542

Ajax hath ta'en AEneas: shall it be?
No, by the flame of yonder glorious heaven,...

128

V,10,3635

Hector is slain.

129

V,10,3637

He's dead; and at the murderer's horse's tail,
In beastly sort, dragg'd through the shameful field....

130

V,10,3644

You understand me not that tell me so:
I do not speak of flight, of fear, of death,...

131

V,10,3669

Hence, broker-lackey! ignomy and shame
Pursue thy life, and live aye with thy name!

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