Speeches (Lines) for Trinculo
in "Tempest"

Total: 39

---
# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,2,1101

Here's neither bush nor shrub, to bear off
any weather at all, and another storm brewing;
I hear it sing i' the wind: yond same black
cloud, yond huge one, looks like a foul
bombard that would shed his liquor. If it
should thunder as it did before, I know not
where to hide my head: yond same cloud cannot
choose but fall by pailfuls. What have we
here? a man or a fish? dead or alive? A fish:
he smells like a fish; a very ancient and fish-
like smell; a kind of not of the newest Poor-
John. A strange fish! Were I in England now,
as once I was, and had but this fish painted,
not a holiday fool there but would give a piece
of silver: there would this monster make a
man; any strange beast there makes a man:
when they will not give a doit to relieve a lame
beggar, they will lazy out ten to see a dead
Indian. Legged like a man and his fins like
arms! Warm o' my troth! I do now let loose
my opinion; hold it no longer: this is no fish,
but an islander, that hath lately suffered by a
thunderbolt.
[Thunder]
Alas, the storm is come again! my best way is to
creep under his gaberdine; there is no other
shelter hereabouts: misery acquaints a man with
strange bed-fellows. I will here shroud till the
dregs of the storm be past.

2

II,2,1176

I should know that voice: it should be—but he is
drowned; and these are devils: O defend me!

3

II,2,1184

Stephano!

4

II,2,1188

Stephano! If thou beest Stephano, touch me and
speak to me: for I am Trinculo—be not afeard—thy
good friend Trinculo.

5

II,2,1196

I took him to be killed with a thunder-stroke. But
art thou not drowned, Stephano? I hope now thou art
not drowned. Is the storm overblown? I hid me
under the dead moon-calf's gaberdine for fear of
the storm. And art thou living, Stephano? O
Stephano, two Neapolitans 'scaped!

6

II,2,1216

Swum ashore. man, like a duck: I can swim like a
duck, I'll be sworn.

7

II,2,1220

O Stephano. hast any more of this?

8

II,2,1231

By this good light, this is a very shallow monster!
I afeard of him! A very weak monster! The man i'
the moon! A most poor credulous monster! Well
drawn, monster, in good sooth!

9

II,2,1237

By this light, a most perfidious and drunken
monster! when 's god's asleep, he'll rob his bottle.

10

II,2,1241

I shall laugh myself to death at this puppy-headed
monster. A most scurvy monster! I could find in my
heart to beat him,—

11

II,2,1245

But that the poor monster's in drink: an abominable monster!

12

II,2,1251

A most ridiculous monster, to make a wonder of a
Poor drunkard!

13

II,2,1266

A howling monster: a drunken monster!

14

III,2,1399

Servant-monster! the folly of this island! They
say there's but five upon this isle: we are three
of them; if th' other two be brained like us, the
state totters.

15

III,2,1405

Where should they be set else? he were a brave
monster indeed, if they were set in his tail.

16

III,2,1412

Your lieutenant, if you list; he's no standard.

17

III,2,1414

Nor go neither; but you'll lie like dogs and yet say
nothing neither.

18

III,2,1420

Thou liest, most ignorant monster: I am in case to
justle a constable. Why, thou deboshed fish thou,
was there ever man a coward that hath drunk so much
sack as I to-day? Wilt thou tell a monstrous lie,
being but half a fish and half a monster?

19

III,2,1426

'Lord' quoth he! That a monster should be such a natural!

20

III,2,1443

Why, I said nothing.

21

III,2,1465

Why, what did I? I did nothing. I'll go farther
off.

22

III,2,1472

I did not give the lie. Out o' your
wits and bearing too? A pox o' your bottle!
this can sack and drinking do. A murrain on
your monster, and the devil take your fingers!

23

III,2,1506

Excellent.

24

III,2,1525

This is the tune of our catch, played by the picture
of Nobody.

25

III,2,1529

O, forgive me my sins!

26

III,2,1546

The sound is going away; let's follow it, and
after do our work.

27

III,2,1550

Wilt come? I'll follow, Stephano.

28

IV,1,1942

Monster, I do smell all horse-piss; at
which my nose is in great indignation.

29

IV,1,1946

Thou wert but a lost monster.

30

IV,1,1951

Ay, but to lose our bottles in the pool,—

31

IV,1,1954

That's more to me than my wetting: yet this is your
harmless fairy, monster.

32

IV,1,1964

O king Stephano! O peer! O worthy Stephano! look
what a wardrobe here is for thee!

33

IV,1,1967

O, ho, monster! we know what belongs to a frippery.
O king Stephano!

34

IV,1,1971

Thy grace shall have it.

35

IV,1,1981

Do, do: we steal by line and level, an't like your grace.

36

IV,1,1986

Monster, come, put some lime upon your fingers, and
away with the rest.

37

IV,1,1994

And this.

38

V,1,2331

If these be true spies which I wear in my head,
here's a goodly sight.

39

V,1,2357

I have been in such a pickle since I
saw you last that, I fear me, will never out of
my bones: I shall not fear fly-blowing.

Return to the "Tempest" menu

Plays + Sonnets + Poems + Concordance + Character Search + Advanced Search + About OSS