Speeches (Lines) for Titus Andronicus
in "Titus Andronicus"

Total: 117

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,86

Hail, Rome, victorious in thy mourning weeds!
Lo, as the bark, that hath discharged her fraught,...

2

I,1,119

I give him you, the noblest that survives,
The eldest son of this distressed queen.

3

I,1,138

Patient yourself, madam, and pardon me.
These are their brethren, whom you Goths beheld...

4

I,1,168

Let it be so; and let Andronicus
Make this his latest farewell to their souls....

5

I,1,187

Kind Rome, that hast thus lovingly reserved
The cordial of mine age to glad my heart!...

6

I,1,195

Thanks, gentle tribune, noble brother Marcus.

7

I,1,211

A better head her glorious body fits
Than his that shakes for age and feebleness:...

8

I,1,227

Patience, Prince Saturninus.

9

I,1,235

Content thee, prince; I will restore to thee
The people's hearts, and wean them from themselves.

10

I,1,242

People of Rome, and people's tribunes here,
I ask your voices and your suffrages:...

11

I,1,248

Tribunes, I thank you: and this suit I make,
That you create your emperor's eldest son,...

12

I,1,270

It doth, my worthy lord; and in this match
I hold me highly honour'd of your grace:...

13

I,1,284

[To TAMORA] Now, madam, are you prisoner to
an emperor;...

14

I,1,306

How, sir! are you in earnest then, my lord?

15

I,1,312

Traitors, avaunt! Where is the emperor's guard?
Treason, my lord! Lavinia is surprised!

16

I,1,321

Follow, my lord, and I'll soon bring her back.

17

I,1,323

What, villain boy!
Barr'st me my way in Rome?

18

I,1,333

Nor thou, nor he, are any sons of mine;
My sons would never so dishonour me:...

19

I,1,348

O monstrous! what reproachful words are these?

20

I,1,354

These words are razors to my wounded heart.

21

I,1,379

I am not bid to wait upon this bride.
Titus, when wert thou wont to walk alone,...

22

I,1,385

No, foolish tribune, no; no son of mine,
Nor thou, nor these, confederates in the deed...

23

I,1,391

Traitors, away! he rests not in this tomb:
This monument five hundred years hath stood,...

24

I,1,401

'And shall!' what villain was it that spake
that word?

25

I,1,404

What, would you bury him in my despite?

26

I,1,407

Marcus, even thou hast struck upon my crest,
And, with these boys, mine honour thou hast wounded:...

27

I,1,416

Speak thou no more, if all the rest will speed.

28

I,1,428

Rise, Marcus, rise.
The dismall'st day is this that e'er I saw,...

29

I,1,440

I know not, Marcus; but I know it is,
Whether by device or no, the heavens can tell:...

30

I,1,473

Prince Bassianus, leave to plead my deeds:
'Tis thou and those that have dishonour'd me....

31

I,1,511

I thank your majesty, and her, my lord:
These words, these looks, infuse new life in me.

32

I,1,542

To-morrow, an it please your majesty
To hunt the panther and the hart with me,...

33

II,2,697

The hunt is up, the morn is bright and grey,
The fields are fragrant and the woods are green:...

34

II,2,726

And I have horse will follow where the game
Makes way, and run like swallows o'er the plain.

35

II,3,1041

High emperor, upon my feeble knee
I beg this boon, with tears not lightly shed,...

36

II,3,1048

I did, my lord: yet let me be their bail;
For, by my father's reverend tomb, I vow...

37

II,3,1059

Come, Lucius, come; stay not to talk with them.

38

III,1,1126

Hear me, grave fathers! noble tribunes, stay!
For pity of mine age, whose youth was spent...

39

III,1,1157

Ah, Lucius, for thy brothers let me plead.
Grave tribunes, once more I entreat of you,—

40

III,1,1160

Why, tis no matter, man; if they did hear,
They would not mark me, or if they did mark,...

41

III,1,1180

O happy man! they have befriended thee.
Why, foolish Lucius, dost thou not perceive...

42

III,1,1191

Will it consume me? let me see it, then.

43

III,1,1193

Why, Marcus, so she is.

44

III,1,1195

Faint-hearted boy, arise, and look upon her.
Speak, Lavinia, what accursed hand...

45

III,1,1221

It was my deer; and he that wounded her
Hath hurt me more than had he killed me dead:...

46

III,1,1246

If they did kill thy husband, then be joyful
Because the law hath ta'en revenge on them....

47

III,1,1269

Ah, Marcus, Marcus! brother, well I wot
Thy napkin cannot drink a tear of mine,...

48

III,1,1273

Mark, Marcus, mark! I understand her signs:
Had she a tongue to speak, now would she say...

49

III,1,1288

O gracious emperor! O gentle Aaron!
Did ever raven sing so like a lark,...

50

III,1,1309

Sirs, strive no more: such wither'd herbs as these
Are meet for plucking up, and therefore mine.

51

III,1,1315

Agree between you; I will spare my hand.

52

III,1,1319

Come hither, Aaron; I'll deceive them both:
Lend me thy hand, and I will give thee mine.

53

III,1,1327

Now stay your strife: what shall be is dispatch'd.
Good Aaron, give his majesty my hand:...

54

III,1,1343

O, here I lift this one hand up to heaven,
And bow this feeble ruin to the earth:...

55

III,1,1355

Is not my sorrow deep, having no bottom?
Then be my passions bottomless with them.

56

III,1,1393

When will this fearful slumber have an end?

57

III,1,1405

Ha, ha, ha!

58

III,1,1407

Why, I have not another tear to shed:
Besides, this sorrow is an enemy,...

59

III,2,1445

So, so; now sit: and look you eat no more
Than will preserve just so much strength in us...

60

III,2,1468

How now! has sorrow made thee dote already?
Why, Marcus, no man should be mad but I....

61

III,2,1495

Peace, tender sapling; thou art made of tears,
And tears will quickly melt thy life away....

62

III,2,1500

Out on thee, murderer! thou kill'st my heart;
Mine eyes are cloy'd with view of tyranny:...

63

III,2,1506

But how, if that fly had a father and mother?
How would he hang his slender gilded wings,...

64

III,2,1515

O, O, O,
Then pardon me for reprehending thee,...

65

III,2,1528

Come, take away. Lavinia, go with me:
I'll to thy closet; and go read with thee...

66

IV,1,1542

She loves thee, boy, too well to do thee harm.

67

IV,1,1545

Fear her not, Lucius: somewhat doth she mean:
See, Lucius, see how much she makes of thee:...

68

IV,1,1568

How now, Lavinia! Marcus, what means this?
Some book there is that she desires to see....

69

IV,1,1579

Lucius, what book is that she tosseth so?

70

IV,1,1584

Soft! see how busily she turns the leaves!
[Helping her]...

71

IV,1,1591

Lavinia, wert thou thus surprised, sweet girl,
Ravish'd and wrong'd, as Philomela was,...

72

IV,1,1600

Give signs, sweet girl, for here are none
but friends,...

73

IV,1,1621

O, do ye read, my lord, what she hath writ?
'Stuprum. Chiron. Demetrius.'

74

IV,1,1625

Magni Dominator poli,
Tam lentus audis scelera? tam lentus vides?

75

IV,1,1639

'Tis sure enough, an you knew how.
But if you hunt these bear-whelps, then beware:...

76

IV,1,1657

Come, go with me into mine armoury;
Lucius, I'll fit thee; and withal, my boy,...

77

IV,1,1663

No, boy, not so; I'll teach thee another course.
Lavinia, come. Marcus, look to my house:...

78

IV,3,1882

Come, Marcus; come, kinsmen; this is the way.
Sir boy, now let me see your archery;...

79

IV,3,1916

Publius, how now! how now, my masters!
What, have you met with her?

80

IV,3,1923

He doth me wrong to feed me with delays.
I'll dive into the burning lake below,...

81

IV,3,1945

Now, masters, draw.
[They shoot]...

82

IV,3,1951

Ha, ha!
Publius, Publius, what hast thou done?...

83

IV,3,1960

Why, there it goes: God give his lordship joy!
[Enter a Clown, with a basket, and two pigeons in]...

84

IV,3,1969

But what says Jupiter, I ask thee?

85

IV,3,1972

Why, villain, art not thou the carrier?

86

IV,3,1974

Why, didst thou not come from heaven?

87

IV,3,1983

Tell me, can you deliver an oration to the emperor
with a grace?

88

IV,3,1986

Sirrah, come hither: make no more ado,
But give your pigeons to the emperor:...

89

IV,3,1993

Then here is a supplication for you. And when you
come to him, at the first approach you must kneel,...

90

IV,3,1999

Sirrah, hast thou a knife? come, let me see it.
Here, Marcus, fold it in the oration;...

91

IV,3,2005

Come, Marcus, let us go. Publius, follow me.

92

V,2,2315

Who doth molest my contemplation?
Is it your trick to make me ope the door,...

93

V,2,2323

No, not a word; how can I grace my talk,
Wanting a hand to give it action?...

94

V,2,2327

I am not mad; I know thee well enough:
Witness this wretched stump, witness these crimson lines;...

95

V,2,2347

Art thou Revenge? and art thou sent to me,
To be a torment to mine enemies?

96

V,2,2350

Do me some service, ere I come to thee.
Lo, by thy side where Rape and Murder stands;...

97

V,2,2367

Are these thy ministers? what are they call'd?

98

V,2,2370

Good Lord, how like the empress' sons they are!
And you, the empress! but we worldly men...

99

V,2,2389

Long have I been forlorn, and all for thee:
Welcome, dread Fury, to my woful house:...

100

V,2,2406

Look round about the wicked streets of Rome;
And when thou find'st a man that's like thyself....

101

V,2,2429

Marcus, my brother! 'tis sad Titus calls.
[Enter MARCUS]...

102

V,2,2444

Nay, nay, let Rape and Murder stay with me;
Or else I'll call my brother back again,...

103

V,2,2453

[Aside] I know them all, though they suppose me mad,
And will o'erreach them in their own devices:...

104

V,2,2459

I know thou dost; and, sweet Revenge, farewell.

105

V,2,2462

Tut, I have work enough for you to do.
Publius, come hither, Caius, and Valentine!

106

V,2,2466

Know you these two?

107

V,2,2468

Fie, Publius, fie! thou art too much deceived;
The one is Murder, Rape is the other's name;...

108

V,2,2483

Come, come, Lavinia; look, thy foes are bound.
Sirs, stop their mouths, let them not speak to me;...

109

V,3,2558

Welcome, my gracious lord; welcome, dread queen;
Welcome, ye warlike Goths; welcome, Lucius;...

110

V,3,2563

Because I would be sure to have all well,
To entertain your highness and your empress.

111

V,3,2566

An if your highness knew my heart, you were.
My lord the emperor, resolve me this:...

112

V,3,2572

Your reason, mighty lord?

113

V,3,2575

A reason mighty, strong, and effectual;
A pattern, precedent, and lively warrant,...

114

V,3,2582

Kill'd her, for whom my tears have made me blind.
I am as woful as Virginius was,...

115

V,3,2587

Will't please you eat? will't please your
highness feed?

116

V,3,2590

Not I; 'twas Chiron and Demetrius:
They ravish'd her, and cut away her tongue;...

117

V,3,2594

Why, there they are both, baked in that pie;
Whereof their mother daintily hath fed,...

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