Speeches (Lines) for Third Gentleman
in "Henry VIII"

Total: 10

---
# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

IV,1,2481

First Gentleman. God save you, sir! where have you been broiling?

Third Gentleman. Among the crowd i' the Abbey; where a finger
Could not be wedged in more: I am stifled
With the mere rankness of their joy.


2

IV,1,2486

Second Gentleman. You saw
The ceremony?

Third Gentleman. That I did.


3

IV,1,2488

First Gentleman. How was it?

Third Gentleman. Well worth the seeing.


4

IV,1,2490

Second Gentleman. Good sir, speak it to us.

Third Gentleman. As well as I am able. The rich stream
Of lords and ladies, having brought the queen
To a prepared place in the choir, fell off
A distance from her; while her grace sat down
To rest awhile, some half an hour or so,
In a rich chair of state, opposing freely
The beauty of her person to the people.
Believe me, sir, she is the goodliest woman
That ever lay by man: which when the people
Had the full view of, such a noise arose
As the shrouds make at sea in a stiff tempest,
As loud, and to as many tunes: hats, cloaks—
Doublets, I think,—flew up; and had their faces
Been loose, this day they had been lost. Such joy
I never saw before. Great-bellied women,
That had not half a week to go, like rams
In the old time of war, would shake the press,
And make 'em reel before 'em. No man living
Could say 'This is my wife' there; all were woven
So strangely in one piece.


5

IV,1,2511

Second Gentleman. But, what follow'd?

Third Gentleman. At length her grace rose, and with modest paces
Came to the altar; where she kneel'd, and saint-like
Cast her fair eyes to heaven and pray'd devoutly.
Then rose again and bow'd her to the people:
When by the Archbishop of Canterbury
She had all the royal makings of a queen;
As holy oil, Edward Confessor's crown,
The rod, and bird of peace, and all such emblems
Laid nobly on her: which perform'd, the choir,
With all the choicest music of the kingdom,
Together sung 'Te Deum.' So she parted,
And with the same full state paced back again
To York-place, where the feast is held.


6

IV,1,2528

First Gentleman. Sir,
You must no more call it York-place, that's past;
For, since the cardinal fell, that title's lost:
'Tis now the king's, and call'd Whitehall.

Third Gentleman. I know it;
But 'tis so lately alter'd, that the old name
Is fresh about me.


7

IV,1,2533

Second Gentleman. What two reverend bishops
Were those that went on each side of the queen?

Third Gentleman. Stokesly and Gardiner; the one of Winchester,
Newly preferr'd from the king's secretary,
The other, London.


8

IV,1,2539

Second Gentleman. He of Winchester
Is held no great good lover of the archbishop's,
The virtuous Cranmer.

Third Gentleman. All the land knows that:
However, yet there is no great breach; when it comes,
Cranmer will find a friend will not shrink from him.


9

IV,1,2543

Second Gentleman. Who may that be, I pray you?

Third Gentleman. Thomas Cromwell;
A man in much esteem with the king, and truly
A worthy friend. The king has made him master
O' the jewel house,
And one, already, of the privy council.


10

IV,1,2549

Second Gentleman. He will deserve more.

Third Gentleman. Yes, without all doubt.
Come, gentlemen, ye shall go my way, which
Is to the court, and there ye shall be my guests:
Something I can command. As I walk thither,
I'll tell ye more.


Return to the "Henry VIII" menu

Plays + Sonnets + Poems + Concordance + Character Search + Advanced Search + About OSS