Speeches (Lines) for Thersites
in "Troilus and Cressida"

Total: 90

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,1,859

Agamemnon, how if he had boils? full, all over,
generally?

2

II,1,862

And those boils did run? say so: did not the
general run then? were not that a botchy core?

3

II,1,865

Then would come some matter from him; I see none now.

4

II,1,869

The plague of Greece upon thee, thou mongrel
beef-witted lord!

5

II,1,873

I shall sooner rail thee into wit and holiness: but,
I think, thy horse will sooner con an oration than...

6

II,1,878

Dost thou think I have no sense, thou strikest me thus?

7

II,1,880

Thou art proclaimed a fool, I think.

8

II,1,882

I would thou didst itch from head to foot and I had
the scratching of thee; I would make thee the...

9

II,1,887

Thou grumblest and railest every hour on Achilles,
and thou art as full of envy at his greatness as...

10

II,1,892

Thou shouldest strike him.

11

II,1,894

He would pun thee into shivers with his fist, as a
sailor breaks a biscuit.

12

II,1,897

Do, do.

13

II,1,899

Ay, do, do; thou sodden-witted lord! thou hast no
more brain than I have in mine elbows; an assinego...

14

II,1,908

You scurvy lord!

15

II,1,910

Mars his idiot! do, rudeness; do, camel; do, do.

16

II,1,914

You see him there, do you?

17

II,1,916

Nay, look upon him.

18

II,1,918

Nay, but regard him well.

19

II,1,920

But yet you look not well upon him; for whosoever you
take him to be, he is Ajax.

20

II,1,923

Ay, but that fool knows not himself.

21

II,1,925

Lo, lo, lo, lo, what modicums of wit he utters! his
evasions have ears thus long. I have bobbed his...

22

II,1,934

I say, this Ajax—

23

II,1,937

Has not so much wit—

24

II,1,939

As will stop the eye of Helen's needle, for whom he
comes to fight.

25

II,1,942

I would have peace and quietness, but the fool will
not: he there: that he: look you there.

26

II,1,946

No, I warrant you; for a fools will shame it.

27

II,1,951

I serve thee not.

28

II,1,953

I serve here voluntarily.

29

II,1,957

E'en so; a great deal of your wit, too, lies in your
sinews, or else there be liars. Hector have a great...

30

II,1,962

There's Ulysses and old Nestor, whose wit was mouldy
ere your grandsires had nails on their toes, yoke you...

31

II,1,966

Yes, good sooth: to, Achilles! to, Ajax! to!

32

II,1,968

'Tis no matter! I shall speak as much as thou
afterwards.

33

II,1,971

I will hold my peace when Achilles' brach bids me, shall I?

34

II,1,973

I will see you hanged, like clotpoles, ere I come
any more to your tents: I will keep where there is...

35

II,3,1215

How now, Thersites! what lost in the labyrinth of
thy fury! Shall the elephant Ajax carry it thus? He...

36

II,3,1239

If I could have remembered a gilt counterfeit, thou
wouldst not have slipped out of my contemplation: but...

37

II,3,1250

Ay: the heavens hear me!

38

II,3,1257

Thy commander, Achilles. Then tell me, Patroclus,
what's Achilles?

39

II,3,1261

Thy knower, Patroclus: then tell me, Patroclus,
what art thou?

40

II,3,1265

I'll decline the whole question. Agamemnon commands
Achilles; Achilles is my lord; I am Patroclus'...

41

II,3,1269

Peace, fool! I have not done.

42

II,3,1271

Agamemnon is a fool; Achilles is a fool; Thersites
is a fool, and, as aforesaid, Patroclus is a fool.

43

II,3,1274

Agamemnon is a fool to offer to command Achilles;
Achilles is a fool to be commanded of Agamemnon;...

44

II,3,1279

Make that demand of the prover. It suffices me thou
art. Look you, who comes here?

45

II,3,1284

Here is such patchery, such juggling and such
knavery! all the argument is a cuckold and a...

46

III,3,2127

A wonder!

47

III,3,2129

Ajax goes up and down the field, asking for himself.

48

III,3,2131

He must fight singly to-morrow with Hector, and is so
prophetically proud of an heroical cudgelling that he...

49

III,3,2135

Why, he stalks up and down like a peacock,—a stride
and a stand: ruminates like an hostess that hath no...

50

III,3,2151

Who, I? why, he'll answer nobody; he professes not
answering: speaking is for beggars; he wears his...

51

III,3,2164

Hum!

52

III,3,2166

Ha!

53

III,3,2168

Hum!

54

III,3,2170

Agamemnon!

55

III,3,2172

Ha!

56

III,3,2174

God b' wi' you, with all my heart.

57

III,3,2176

If to-morrow be a fair day, by eleven o'clock it will
go one way or other: howsoever, he shall pay for me...

58

III,3,2180

Fare you well, with all my heart.

59

III,3,2182

No, but he's out o' tune thus. What music will be in
him when Hector has knocked out his brains, I know...

60

III,3,2187

Let me bear another to his horse; for that's the more
capable creature.

61

III,3,2192

Would the fountain of your mind were clear again,
that I might water an ass at it! I had rather be a...

62

V,1,2937

Why, thou picture of what thou seemest, and idol
of idiot worshippers, here's a letter for thee.

63

V,1,2940

Why, thou full dish of fool, from Troy.

64

V,1,2942

The surgeon's box, or the patient's wound.

65

V,1,2944

Prithee, be silent, boy; I profit not by thy talk:
thou art thought to be Achilles' male varlet.

66

V,1,2947

Why, his masculine whore. Now, the rotten diseases
of the south, the guts-griping, ruptures, catarrhs,...

67

V,1,2957

Do I curse thee?

68

V,1,2960

No! why art thou then exasperate, thou idle
immaterial skein of sleave-silk, thou green sarcenet...

69

V,1,2966

Finch-egg!

70

V,1,2979

With too much blood and too little brain, these two
may run mad; but, if with too much brain and too...

71

V,1,3014

Sweet draught: 'sweet' quoth 'a! sweet sink,
sweet sewer.

72

V,1,3033

That same Diomed's a false-hearted rogue, a most
unjust knave; I will no more trust him when he leers...

73

V,2,3060

And any man may sing her, if he can take her cliff;
she's noted.

74

V,2,3069

Roguery!

75

V,2,3074

A juggling trick,—to be secretly open.

76

V,2,3114

How the devil Luxury, with his fat rump and
potato-finger, tickles these together! Fry, lechery, fry!

77

V,2,3126

Now the pledge; now, now, now!

78

V,2,3137

Now she sharpens: well said, whetstone!

79

V,2,3170

Nor I, by Pluto: but that that likes not you pleases me best.

80

V,2,3183

A proof of strength she could not publish more,
Unless she said ' My mind is now turn'd whore.'

81

V,2,3210

Will he swagger himself out on's own eyes?

82

V,2,3251

He'll tickle it for his concupy.

83

V,2,3267

Would I could meet that rogue Diomed! I would
croak like a raven; I would bode, I would bode....

84

V,4,3410

Now they are clapper-clawing one another; I'll go
look on. That dissembling abominable varlets Diomed,...

85

V,4,3435

Hold thy whore, Grecian!—now for thy whore,
Trojan!—now the sleeve, now the sleeve!

86

V,4,3441

No, no, I am a rascal; a scurvy railing knave:
a very filthy rogue.

87

V,4,3445

God-a-mercy, that thou wilt believe me; but a
plague break thy neck for frightening me! What's...

88

V,7,3568

The cuckold and the cuckold-maker are at it. Now,
bull! now, dog! 'Loo, Paris, 'loo! now my double-...

89

V,7,3575

What art thou?

90

V,7,3577

I am a bastard too; I love bastards: I am a bastard
begot, bastard instructed, bastard in mind, bastard...

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