Speeches (Lines) for Speed
in "Two Gentlemen of Verona"

Total: 117

---
# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,74

(stage directions). [Enter SPEED]

Speed. Sir Proteus, save you! Saw you my master?


2

I,1,76

Proteus. But now he parted hence, to embark for Milan.

Speed. Twenty to one then he is shipp'd already,
And I have play'd the sheep in losing him.


3

I,1,80

Proteus. Indeed, a sheep doth very often stray,
An if the shepherd be a while away.

Speed. You conclude that my master is a shepherd, then,
and I a sheep?


4

I,1,83

Proteus. I do.

Speed. Why then, my horns are his horns, whether I wake or sleep.


5

I,1,85

Proteus. A silly answer and fitting well a sheep.

Speed. This proves me still a sheep.


6

I,1,87

Proteus. True; and thy master a shepherd.

Speed. Nay, that I can deny by a circumstance.


7

I,1,89

Proteus. It shall go hard but I'll prove it by another.

Speed. The shepherd seeks the sheep, and not the sheep the
shepherd; but I seek my master, and my master seeks
not me: therefore I am no sheep.


8

I,1,96

Proteus. The sheep for fodder follow the shepherd; the
shepherd for food follows not the sheep: thou for
wages followest thy master; thy master for wages
follows not thee: therefore thou art a sheep.

Speed. Such another proof will make me cry 'baa.'


9

I,1,98

Proteus. But, dost thou hear? gavest thou my letter to Julia?

Speed. Ay sir: I, a lost mutton, gave your letter to her,
a laced mutton, and she, a laced mutton, gave me, a
lost mutton, nothing for my labour.


10

I,1,102

Proteus. Here's too small a pasture for such store of muttons.

Speed. If the ground be overcharged, you were best stick her.


11

I,1,104

Proteus. Nay: in that you are astray, 'twere best pound you.

Speed. Nay, sir, less than a pound shall serve me for
carrying your letter.


12

I,1,107

Proteus. You mistake; I mean the pound,—a pinfold.

Speed. From a pound to a pin? fold it over and over,
'Tis threefold too little for carrying a letter to
your lover.


13

I,1,111

Proteus. But what said she?

Speed. [First nodding] Ay.


14

I,1,113

Proteus. Nod—Ay—why, that's noddy.

Speed. You mistook, sir; I say, she did nod: and you ask
me if she did nod; and I say, 'Ay.'


15

I,1,116

Proteus. And that set together is noddy.

Speed. Now you have taken the pains to set it together,
take it for your pains.


16

I,1,119

Proteus. No, no; you shall have it for bearing the letter.

Speed. Well, I perceive I must be fain to bear with you.


17

I,1,121

Proteus. Why sir, how do you bear with me?

Speed. Marry, sir, the letter, very orderly; having nothing
but the word 'noddy' for my pains.


18

I,1,124

Proteus. Beshrew me, but you have a quick wit.

Speed. And yet it cannot overtake your slow purse.


19

I,1,126

Proteus. Come come, open the matter in brief: what said she?

Speed. Open your purse, that the money and the matter may
be both at once delivered.


20

I,1,129

Proteus. Well, sir, here is for your pains. What said she?

Speed. Truly, sir, I think you'll hardly win her.


21

I,1,131

Proteus. Why, couldst thou perceive so much from her?

Speed. Sir, I could perceive nothing at all from her; no,
not so much as a ducat for delivering your letter:
and being so hard to me that brought your mind, I
fear she'll prove as hard to you in telling your
mind. Give her no token but stones; for she's as
hard as steel.


22

I,1,138

Proteus. What said she? nothing?

Speed. No, not so much as 'Take this for thy pains.' To
testify your bounty, I thank you, you have testerned
me; in requital whereof, henceforth carry your
letters yourself: and so, sir, I'll commend you to my master.


23

II,1,400

(stage directions). [Enter VALENTINE and SPEED]

Speed. Sir, your glove.


24

II,1,402

Valentine. Not mine; my gloves are on.

Speed. Why, then, this may be yours, for this is but one.


25

II,1,406

Valentine. Ha! let me see: ay, give it me, it's mine:
Sweet ornament that decks a thing divine!
Ah, Silvia, Silvia!

Speed. Madam Silvia! Madam Silvia!


26

II,1,408

Valentine. How now, sirrah?

Speed. She is not within hearing, sir.


27

II,1,410

Valentine. Why, sir, who bade you call her?

Speed. Your worship, sir; or else I mistook.


28

II,1,412

Valentine. Well, you'll still be too forward.

Speed. And yet I was last chidden for being too slow.


29

II,1,414

Valentine. Go to, sir: tell me, do you know Madam Silvia?

Speed. She that your worship loves?


30

II,1,416

Valentine. Why, how know you that I am in love?

Speed. Marry, by these special marks: first, you have
learned, like Sir Proteus, to wreathe your arms,
like a malecontent; to relish a love-song, like a
robin-redbreast; to walk alone, like one that had
the pestilence; to sigh, like a school-boy that had
lost his A B C; to weep, like a young wench that had
buried her grandam; to fast, like one that takes
diet; to watch like one that fears robbing; to
speak puling, like a beggar at Hallowmas. You were
wont, when you laughed, to crow like a cock; when you
walked, to walk like one of the lions; when you
fasted, it was presently after dinner; when you
looked sadly, it was for want of money: and now you
are metamorphosed with a mistress, that, when I look
on you, I can hardly think you my master.


31

II,1,432

Valentine. Are all these things perceived in me?

Speed. They are all perceived without ye.


32

II,1,434

Valentine. Without me? they cannot.

Speed. Without you? nay, that's certain, for, without you
were so simple, none else would: but you are so
without these follies, that these follies are within
you and shine through you like the water in an
urinal, that not an eye that sees you but is a
physician to comment on your malady.


33

II,1,441

Valentine. But tell me, dost thou know my lady Silvia?

Speed. She that you gaze on so as she sits at supper?


34

II,1,443

Valentine. Hast thou observed that? even she, I mean.

Speed. Why, sir, I know her not.


35

II,1,446

Valentine. Dost thou know her by my gazing on her, and yet
knowest her not?

Speed. Is she not hard-favoured, sir?


36

II,1,448

Valentine. Not so fair, boy, as well-favoured.

Speed. Sir, I know that well enough.


37

II,1,450

Valentine. What dost thou know?

Speed. That she is not so fair as, of you, well-favoured.


38

II,1,452

Valentine. I mean that her beauty is exquisite, but her favour infinite.

Speed. That's because the one is painted and the other out
of all count.


39

II,1,455

Valentine. How painted? and how out of count?

Speed. Marry, sir, so painted, to make her fair, that no
man counts of her beauty.


40

II,1,458

Valentine. How esteemest thou me? I account of her beauty.

Speed. You never saw her since she was deformed.


41

II,1,460

Valentine. How long hath she been deformed?

Speed. Ever since you loved her.


42

II,1,463

Valentine. I have loved her ever since I saw her; and still I
see her beautiful.

Speed. If you love her, you cannot see her.


43

II,1,465

Valentine. Why?

Speed. Because Love is blind. O, that you had mine eyes;
or your own eyes had the lights they were wont to
have when you chid at Sir Proteus for going
ungartered!


44

II,1,470

Valentine. What should I see then?

Speed. Your own present folly and her passing deformity:
for he, being in love, could not see to garter his
hose, and you, being in love, cannot see to put on your hose.


45

II,1,475

Valentine. Belike, boy, then, you are in love; for last
morning you could not see to wipe my shoes.

Speed. True, sir; I was in love with my bed: I thank you,
you swinged me for my love, which makes me the
bolder to chide you for yours.


46

II,1,479

Valentine. In conclusion, I stand affected to her.

Speed. I would you were set, so your affection would cease.


47

II,1,482

Valentine. Last night she enjoined me to write some lines to
one she loves.

Speed. And have you?


48

II,1,484

Valentine. I have.

Speed. Are they not lamely writ?


49

II,1,487

Valentine. No, boy, but as well as I can do them. Peace!
here she comes.

Speed. [Aside] O excellent motion! O exceeding puppet!
Now will he interpret to her.


50

II,1,491

Valentine. Madam and mistress, a thousand good-morrows.

Speed. [Aside] O, give ye good even! here's a million of manners.


51

II,1,493

Silvia. Sir Valentine and servant, to you two thousand.

Speed. [Aside] He should give her interest and she gives it him.


52

II,1,509

Silvia. A pretty period! Well, I guess the sequel;
And yet I will not name it; and yet I care not;
And yet take this again; and yet I thank you,
Meaning henceforth to trouble you no more.

Speed. [Aside] And yet you will; and yet another 'yet.'


53

II,1,525

(stage directions). [Exit]

Speed. O jest unseen, inscrutable, invisible,
As a nose on a man's face, or a weathercock on a steeple!
My master sues to her, and she hath
taught her suitor,
He being her pupil, to become her tutor.
O excellent device! was there ever heard a better,
That my master, being scribe, to himself should write
the letter?


54

II,1,534

Valentine. How now, sir? what are you reasoning with yourself?

Speed. Nay, I was rhyming: 'tis you that have the reason.


55

II,1,536

Valentine. To do what?

Speed. To be a spokesman for Madam Silvia.


56

II,1,538

Valentine. To whom?

Speed. To yourself: why, she wooes you by a figure.


57

II,1,540

Valentine. What figure?

Speed. By a letter, I should say.


58

II,1,542

Valentine. Why, she hath not writ to me?

Speed. What need she, when she hath made you write to
yourself? Why, do you not perceive the jest?


59

II,1,545

Valentine. No, believe me.

Speed. No believing you, indeed, sir. But did you perceive
her earnest?


60

II,1,548

Valentine. She gave me none, except an angry word.

Speed. Why, she hath given you a letter.


61

II,1,550

Valentine. That's the letter I writ to her friend.

Speed. And that letter hath she delivered, and there an end.


62

II,1,552

Valentine. I would it were no worse.

Speed. I'll warrant you, 'tis as well:
For often have you writ to her, and she, in modesty,
Or else for want of idle time, could not again reply;
Or fearing else some messenger that might her mind discover,
Herself hath taught her love himself to write unto her lover.
All this I speak in print, for in print I found it.
Why muse you, sir? 'tis dinner-time.


63

II,1,560

Valentine. I have dined.

Speed. Ay, but hearken, sir; though the chameleon Love can
feed on the air, I am one that am nourished by my
victuals, and would fain have meat. O, be not like
your mistress; be moved, be moved.


64

II,4,656

Valentine. Mistress?

Speed. Master, Sir Thurio frowns on you.


65

II,4,658

Valentine. Ay, boy, it's for love.

Speed. Not of you.


66

II,4,660

Valentine. Of my mistress, then.

Speed. 'Twere good you knocked him.


67

II,5,879

(stage directions). [Enter SPEED and LAUNCE severally]

Speed. Launce! by mine honesty, welcome to Milan!


68

II,5,885

Launce. Forswear not thyself, sweet youth, for I am not
welcome. I reckon this always, that a man is never
undone till he be hanged, nor never welcome to a
place till some certain shot be paid and the hostess
say 'Welcome!'

Speed. Come on, you madcap, I'll to the alehouse with you
presently; where, for one shot of five pence, thou
shalt have five thousand welcomes. But, sirrah, how
did thy master part with Madam Julia?


69

II,5,891

Launce. Marry, after they closed in earnest, they parted very
fairly in jest.

Speed. But shall she marry him?


70

II,5,893

Launce. No.

Speed. How then? shall he marry her?


71

II,5,895

Launce. No, neither.

Speed. What, are they broken?


72

II,5,897

Launce. No, they are both as whole as a fish.

Speed. Why, then, how stands the matter with them?


73

II,5,900

Launce. Marry, thus: when it stands well with him, it
stands well with her.

Speed. What an ass art thou! I understand thee not.


74

II,5,903

Launce. What a block art thou, that thou canst not! My
staff understands me.

Speed. What thou sayest?


75

II,5,906

Launce. Ay, and what I do too: look thee, I'll but lean,
and my staff understands me.

Speed. It stands under thee, indeed.


76

II,5,908

Launce. Why, stand-under and under-stand is all one.

Speed. But tell me true, will't be a match?


77

II,5,911

Launce. Ask my dog: if he say ay, it will! if he say no,
it will; if he shake his tail and say nothing, it will.

Speed. The conclusion is then that it will.


78

II,5,913

Launce. Thou shalt never get such a secret from me but by a parable.

Speed. 'Tis well that I get it so. But, Launce, how sayest
thou, that my master is become a notable lover?


79

II,5,916

Launce. I never knew him otherwise.

Speed. Than how?


80

II,5,918

Launce. A notable lubber, as thou reportest him to be.

Speed. Why, thou whoreson ass, thou mistakest me.


81

II,5,920

Launce. Why, fool, I meant not thee; I meant thy master.

Speed. I tell thee, my master is become a hot lover.


82

II,5,925

Launce. Why, I tell thee, I care not though he burn himself
in love. If thou wilt, go with me to the alehouse;
if not, thou art an Hebrew, a Jew, and not worth the
name of a Christian.

Speed. Why?


83

II,5,928

Launce. Because thou hast not so much charity in thee as to
go to the ale with a Christian. Wilt thou go?

Speed. At thy service.


84

III,1,1355

(stage directions). [Enter SPEED]

Speed. How now, Signior Launce! what news with your
mastership?


85

III,1,1358

Launce. With my master's ship? why, it is at sea.

Speed. Well, your old vice still; mistake the word. What
news, then, in your paper?


86

III,1,1361

Launce. The blackest news that ever thou heardest.

Speed. Why, man, how black?


87

III,1,1363

Launce. Why, as black as ink.

Speed. Let me read them.


88

III,1,1365

Launce. Fie on thee, jolt-head! thou canst not read.

Speed. Thou liest; I can.


89

III,1,1367

Launce. I will try thee. Tell me this: who begot thee?

Speed. Marry, the son of my grandfather.


90

III,1,1370

Launce. O illiterate loiterer! it was the son of thy
grandmother: this proves that thou canst not read.

Speed. Come, fool, come; try me in thy paper.


91

III,1,1372

Launce. There; and St. Nicholas be thy speed!

Speed. [Reads] 'Imprimis: She can milk.'


92

III,1,1374

Launce. Ay, that she can.

Speed. 'Item: She brews good ale.'


93

III,1,1377

Launce. And thereof comes the proverb: 'Blessing of your
heart, you brew good ale.'

Speed. 'Item: She can sew.'


94

III,1,1379

Launce. That's as much as to say, Can she so?

Speed. 'Item: She can knit.'


95

III,1,1382

Launce. What need a man care for a stock with a wench, when
she can knit him a stock?

Speed. 'Item: She can wash and scour.'


96

III,1,1385

Launce. A special virtue: for then she need not be washed
and scoured.

Speed. 'Item: She can spin.'


97

III,1,1388

Launce. Then may I set the world on wheels, when she can
spin for her living.

Speed. 'Item: She hath many nameless virtues.'


98

III,1,1391

Launce. That's as much as to say, bastard virtues; that,
indeed, know not their fathers and therefore have no names.

Speed. 'Here follow her vices.'


99

III,1,1393

Launce. Close at the heels of her virtues.

Speed. 'Item: She is not to be kissed fasting in respect
of her breath.'


100

III,1,1396

Launce. Well, that fault may be mended with a breakfast. Read on.

Speed. 'Item: She hath a sweet mouth.'


101

III,1,1398

Launce. That makes amends for her sour breath.

Speed. 'Item: She doth talk in her sleep.'


102

III,1,1400

Launce. It's no matter for that, so she sleep not in her talk.

Speed. 'Item: She is slow in words.'


103

III,1,1404

Launce. O villain, that set this down among her vices! To
be slow in words is a woman's only virtue: I pray
thee, out with't, and place it for her chief virtue.

Speed. 'Item: She is proud.'


104

III,1,1407

Launce. Out with that too; it was Eve's legacy, and cannot
be ta'en from her.

Speed. 'Item: She hath no teeth.'


105

III,1,1409

Launce. I care not for that neither, because I love crusts.

Speed. 'Item: She is curst.'


106

III,1,1411

Launce. Well, the best is, she hath no teeth to bite.

Speed. 'Item: She will often praise her liquor.'


107

III,1,1414

Launce. If her liquor be good, she shall: if she will not, I
will; for good things should be praised.

Speed. 'Item: She is too liberal.'


108

III,1,1419

Launce. Of her tongue she cannot, for that's writ down she
is slow of; of her purse she shall not, for that
I'll keep shut: now, of another thing she may, and
that cannot I help. Well, proceed.

Speed. 'Item: She hath more hair than wit, and more faults
than hairs, and more wealth than faults.'


109

III,1,1424

Launce. Stop there; I'll have her: she was mine, and not
mine, twice or thrice in that last article.
Rehearse that once more.

Speed. 'Item: She hath more hair than wit,'—


110

III,1,1430

Launce. More hair than wit? It may be; I'll prove it. The
cover of the salt hides the salt, and therefore it
is more than the salt; the hair that covers the wit
is more than the wit, for the greater hides the
less. What's next?

Speed. 'And more faults than hairs,'—


111

III,1,1432

Launce. That's monstrous: O, that that were out!

Speed. 'And more wealth than faults.'


112

III,1,1436

Launce. Why, that word makes the faults gracious. Well,
I'll have her; and if it be a match, as nothing is
impossible,—

Speed. What then?


113

III,1,1439

Launce. Why, then will I tell thee—that thy master stays
for thee at the North-gate.

Speed. For me?


114

III,1,1442

Launce. For thee! ay, who art thou? he hath stayed for a
better man than thee.

Speed. And must I go to him?


115

III,1,1445

Launce. Thou must run to him, for thou hast stayed so long
that going will scarce serve the turn.

Speed. Why didst not tell me sooner? pox of your love letters!


116

IV,1,1558

Third Outlaw. Stand, sir, and throw us that you have about ye:
If not: we'll make you sit and rifle you.

Speed. Sir, we are undone; these are the villains
That all the travellers do fear so much.


117

IV,1,1592

First Outlaw. We'll have him. Sirs, a word.

Speed. Master, be one of them; it's an honourable kind of thievery.


Return to the "Two Gentlemen of Verona" menu

Plays + Sonnets + Poems + Concordance + Character Search + Advanced Search + About OSS