Speeches (Lines) for Snout
in "Midsummer Night's Dream"

Total: 9

# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text



Quince. Robin Starveling, you must play Thisby's mother.
Tom Snout, the tinker.

Snout. Here, Peter Quince.



Bottom. There are things in this comedy of Pyramus and
Thisby that will never please. First, Pyramus must
draw a sword to kill himself; which the ladies
cannot abide. How answer you that?

Snout. By'r lakin, a parlous fear.



Bottom. No, make it two more; let it be written in eight and eight.

Snout. Will not the ladies be afeard of the lion?



Bottom. Masters, you ought to consider with yourselves: to
bring in—God shield us!—a lion among ladies, is a
most dreadful thing; for there is not a more fearful
wild-fowl than your lion living; and we ought to
look to 't.

Snout. Therefore another prologue must tell he is not a lion.



Quince. Well it shall be so. But there is two hard things;
that is, to bring the moonlight into a chamber; for,
you know, Pyramus and Thisby meet by moonlight.

Snout. Doth the moon shine that night we play our play?



Quince. Ay; or else one must come in with a bush of thorns
and a lanthorn, and say he comes to disfigure, or to
present, the person of Moonshine. Then, there is
another thing: we must have a wall in the great
chamber; for Pyramus and Thisby says the story, did
talk through the chink of a wall.

Snout. You can never bring in a wall. What say you, Bottom?



(stage directions). [Re-enter SNOUT]

Snout. O Bottom, thou art changed! what do I see on thee?



Demetrius. No wonder, my lord: one lion may, when many asses do.

Snout. In this same interlude it doth befall
That I, one Snout by name, present a wall;
And such a wall, as I would have you think,
That had in it a crannied hole or chink,
Through which the lovers, Pyramus and Thisby,
Did whisper often very secretly.
This loam, this rough-cast and this stone doth show
That I am that same wall; the truth is so:
And this the cranny is, right and sinister,
Through which the fearful lovers are to whisper.



(stage directions). [Exeunt Pyramus and Thisbe]

Snout. [as Wall] Thus have I, Wall, my part discharged so;
And, being done, thus Wall away doth go.

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