Speeches (Lines) for Sir William Catesby
in "Richard III"

Total: 31

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,3,791

(stage directions). [Enter CATESBY]

Sir William Catesby. Madam, his majesty doth call for you,
And for your grace; and you, my noble lords.


2

III,1,1740

Duke of Buckingham. Well, let them rest. Come hither, Catesby.
Thou art sworn as deeply to effect what we intend
As closely to conceal what we impart:
Thou know'st our reasons urged upon the way;
What think'st thou? is it not an easy matter
To make William Lord Hastings of our mind,
For the instalment of this noble duke
In the seat royal of this famous isle?

Sir William Catesby. He for his father's sake so loves the prince,
That he will not be won to aught against him.


3

III,1,1743

Duke of Buckingham. What think'st thou, then, of Stanley? what will he?

Sir William Catesby. He will do all in all as Hastings doth.


4

III,1,1762

Duke of Buckingham. Good Catesby, go, effect this business soundly.

Sir William Catesby. My good lords both, with all the heed I may.


5

III,1,1764

Richard III (Duke of Gloucester). Shall we hear from you, Catesby, ere we sleep?

Sir William Catesby. You shall, my lord.


6

III,2,1816

(stage directions). [Enter CATESBY]

Sir William Catesby. Many good morrows to my noble lord!


7

III,2,1819

Lord Hastings. Good morrow, Catesby; you are early stirring
What news, what news, in this our tottering state?

Sir William Catesby. It is a reeling world, indeed, my lord;
And I believe twill never stand upright
Tim Richard wear the garland of the realm.


8

III,2,1823

Lord Hastings. How! wear the garland! dost thou mean the crown?

Sir William Catesby. Ay, my good lord.


9

III,2,1827

Lord Hastings. I'll have this crown of mine cut from my shoulders
Ere I will see the crown so foul misplaced.
But canst thou guess that he doth aim at it?

Sir William Catesby. Ay, on my life; and hopes to find forward
Upon his party for the gain thereof:
And thereupon he sends you this good news,
That this same very day your enemies,
The kindred of the queen, must die at Pomfret.


10

III,2,1837

Lord Hastings. Indeed, I am no mourner for that news,
Because they have been still mine enemies:
But, that I'll give my voice on Richard's side,
To bar my master's heirs in true descent,
God knows I will not do it, to the death.

Sir William Catesby. God keep your lordship in that gracious mind!


11

III,2,1842

Lord Hastings. But I shall laugh at this a twelve-month hence,
That they who brought me in my master's hate
I live to look upon their tragedy.
I tell thee, Catesby—

Sir William Catesby. What, my lord?


12

III,2,1845

Lord Hastings. Ere a fortnight make me elder,
I'll send some packing that yet think not on it.

Sir William Catesby. 'Tis a vile thing to die, my gracious lord,
When men are unprepared and look not for it.


13

III,2,1852

Lord Hastings. O monstrous, monstrous! and so falls it out
With Rivers, Vaughan, Grey: and so 'twill do
With some men else, who think themselves as safe
As thou and I; who, as thou know'st, are dear
To princely Richard and to Buckingham.

Sir William Catesby. The princes both make high account of you;
[Aside]
For they account his head upon the bridge.


14

III,7,2264

Duke of Buckingham. Go, go, up to the leads; the lord mayor knocks.
[Exit GLOUCESTER]
[Enter the Lord Mayor and Citizens]
Welcome my lord; I dance attendance here;
I think the duke will not be spoke withal.
[Enter CATESBY]
Here comes his servant: how now, Catesby,
What says he?

Sir William Catesby. My lord: he doth entreat your grace;
To visit him to-morrow or next day:
He is within, with two right reverend fathers,
Divinely bent to meditation;
And no worldly suit would he be moved,
To draw him from his holy exercise.


15

III,7,2275

Duke of Buckingham. Return, good Catesby, to thy lord again;
Tell him, myself, the mayor and citizens,
In deep designs and matters of great moment,
No less importing than our general good,
Are come to have some conference with his grace.

Sir William Catesby. I'll tell him what you say, my lord.


16

III,7,2291

Duke of Buckingham. I fear he will.
[Re-enter CATESBY]
How now, Catesby, what says your lord?

Sir William Catesby. My lord,
He wonders to what end you have assembled
Such troops of citizens to speak with him,
His grace not being warn'd thereof before:
My lord, he fears you mean no good to him.


17

III,7,2414

Duke of Buckingham. Refuse not, mighty lord, this proffer'd love.

Sir William Catesby. O, make them joyful, grant their lawful suit!


18

III,7,2433

(stage directions). [Exit BUCKINGHAM with the Citizens]

Sir William Catesby. Call them again, my lord, and accept their suit.


19

IV,2,2611

(stage directions). [Exit]

Sir William Catesby. [Aside to a stander by]
The king is angry: see, he bites the lip.


20

IV,2,2640

Richard III (Duke of Gloucester). Catesby!

Sir William Catesby. My lord?


21

IV,3,2776

(stage directions). [Enter CATESBY]

Sir William Catesby. My lord!


22

IV,3,2778

Richard III (Duke of Gloucester). Good news or bad, that thou comest in so bluntly?

Sir William Catesby. Bad news, my lord: Ely is fled to Richmond;
And Buckingham, back'd with the hardy Welshmen,
Is in the field, and still his power increaseth.


23

IV,4,3258

Richard III (Duke of Gloucester). Some light-foot friend post to the Duke of Norfolk:
Ratcliff, thyself, or Catesby; where is he?

Sir William Catesby. Here, my lord.


24

IV,4,3266

Richard III (Duke of Gloucester). Fly to the duke:
[To RATCLIFF]
Post thou to Salisbury
When thou comest thither—
[To CATESBY]
Dull, unmindful villain,
Why stand'st thou still, and go'st not to the duke?

Sir William Catesby. First, mighty sovereign, let me know your mind,
What from your grace I shall deliver to him.


25

IV,4,3271

Richard III (Duke of Gloucester). O, true, good Catesby: bid him levy straight
The greatest strength and power he can make,
And meet me presently at Salisbury.

Sir William Catesby. I go.


26

IV,4,3365

(stage directions). [Re-enter CATESBY]

Sir William Catesby. My liege, the Duke of Buckingham is taken;
That is the best news: that the Earl of Richmond
Is with a mighty power landed at Milford,
Is colder tidings, yet they must be told.


27

V,3,3511

Richard III (Duke of Gloucester). What is't o'clock?

Sir William Catesby. It's supper-time, my lord;
It's nine o'clock.


28

V,3,3517

Richard III (Duke of Gloucester). I will not sup to-night.
Give me some ink and paper.
What, is my beaver easier than it was?
And all my armour laid into my tent?

Sir William Catesby. If is, my liege; and all things are in readiness.


29

V,3,3525

Richard III (Duke of Gloucester). Catesby!

Sir William Catesby. My lord?


30

V,4,3874

(stage directions). [Alarum: excursions. Enter NORFOLK and forces fighting; to him CATESBY]

Sir William Catesby. Rescue, my Lord of Norfolk, rescue, rescue!
The king enacts more wonders than a man,
Daring an opposite to every danger:
His horse is slain, and all on foot he fights,
Seeking for Richmond in the throat of death.
Rescue, fair lord, or else the day is lost!


31

V,4,3882

Richard III (Duke of Gloucester). A horse! a horse! my kingdom for a horse!

Sir William Catesby. Withdraw, my lord; I'll help you to a horse.


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