Speeches (Lines) for Sir William Catesby
in "Richard III"

Total: 31

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,3,791

Madam, his majesty doth call for you,
And for your grace; and you, my noble lords.

2

III,1,1740

He for his father's sake so loves the prince,
That he will not be won to aught against him.

3

III,1,1743

He will do all in all as Hastings doth.

4

III,1,1762

My good lords both, with all the heed I may.

5

III,1,1764

You shall, my lord.

6

III,2,1816

Many good morrows to my noble lord!

7

III,2,1819

It is a reeling world, indeed, my lord;
And I believe twill never stand upright
Tim Richard wear the garland of the realm.

8

III,2,1823

Ay, my good lord.

9

III,2,1827

Ay, on my life; and hopes to find forward
Upon his party for the gain thereof:
And thereupon he sends you this good news,
That this same very day your enemies,
The kindred of the queen, must die at Pomfret.

10

III,2,1837

God keep your lordship in that gracious mind!

11

III,2,1842

What, my lord?

12

III,2,1845

'Tis a vile thing to die, my gracious lord,
When men are unprepared and look not for it.

13

III,2,1852

The princes both make high account of you;
[Aside]
For they account his head upon the bridge.

14

III,7,2264

My lord: he doth entreat your grace;
To visit him to-morrow or next day:
He is within, with two right reverend fathers,
Divinely bent to meditation;
And no worldly suit would he be moved,
To draw him from his holy exercise.

15

III,7,2275

I'll tell him what you say, my lord.

16

III,7,2291

My lord,
He wonders to what end you have assembled
Such troops of citizens to speak with him,
His grace not being warn'd thereof before:
My lord, he fears you mean no good to him.

17

III,7,2414

O, make them joyful, grant their lawful suit!

18

III,7,2433

Call them again, my lord, and accept their suit.

19

IV,2,2611

[Aside to a stander by]
The king is angry: see, he bites the lip.

20

IV,2,2640

My lord?

21

IV,3,2776

My lord!

22

IV,3,2778

Bad news, my lord: Ely is fled to Richmond;
And Buckingham, back'd with the hardy Welshmen,
Is in the field, and still his power increaseth.

23

IV,4,3258

Here, my lord.

24

IV,4,3266

First, mighty sovereign, let me know your mind,
What from your grace I shall deliver to him.

25

IV,4,3271

I go.

26

IV,4,3365

My liege, the Duke of Buckingham is taken;
That is the best news: that the Earl of Richmond
Is with a mighty power landed at Milford,
Is colder tidings, yet they must be told.

27

V,3,3511

It's supper-time, my lord;
It's nine o'clock.

28

V,3,3517

If is, my liege; and all things are in readiness.

29

V,3,3525

My lord?

30

V,4,3874

Rescue, my Lord of Norfolk, rescue, rescue!
The king enacts more wonders than a man,
Daring an opposite to every danger:
His horse is slain, and all on foot he fights,
Seeking for Richmond in the throat of death.
Rescue, fair lord, or else the day is lost!

31

V,4,3882

Withdraw, my lord; I'll help you to a horse.

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