Speeches (Lines) for Simpcox
in "Henry VI, Part II"

Total: 18

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,1,817

Henry VI. Good fellow, tell us here the circumstance,
That we for thee may glorify the Lord.
What, hast thou been long blind and now restored?

Simpcox. Born blind, an't please your grace.


2

II,1,824

Henry VI. Where wert thou born?

Simpcox. At Berwick in the north, an't like your grace.


3

II,1,830

Queen Margaret. Tell me, good fellow, camest thou here by chance,
Or of devotion, to this holy shrine?

Simpcox. God knows, of pure devotion; being call'd
A hundred times and oftener, in my sleep,
By good Saint Alban; who said, 'Simpcox, come,
Come, offer at my shrine, and I will help thee.'


4

II,1,837

Winchester. What, art thou lame?

Simpcox. Ay, God Almighty help me!


5

II,1,839

Earl of Suffolk. How camest thou so?

Simpcox. A fall off of a tree.


6

II,1,842

Duke of Gloucester. How long hast thou been blind?

Simpcox. Born so, master.


7

II,1,844

Duke of Gloucester. What, and wouldst climb a tree?

Simpcox. But that in all my life, when I was a youth.


8

II,1,848

Duke of Gloucester. Mass, thou lovedst plums well, that wouldst
venture so.

Simpcox. Alas, good master, my wife desired some damsons,
And made me climb, with danger of my life.


9

II,1,853

Duke of Gloucester. A subtle knave! but yet it shall not serve.
Let me see thine eyes: wink now: now open them:
In my opinion yet thou seest not well.

Simpcox. Yes, master, clear as day, I thank God and
Saint Alban.


10

II,1,856

Duke of Gloucester. Say'st thou me so? What colour is this cloak of?

Simpcox. Red, master; red as blood.


11

II,1,858

Duke of Gloucester. Why, that's well said. What colour is my gown of?

Simpcox. Black, forsooth: coal-black as jet.


12

II,1,864

Duke of Gloucester. Tell me, sirrah, what's my name?

Simpcox. Alas, master, I know not.


13

II,1,866

Duke of Gloucester. What's his name?

Simpcox. I know not.


14

II,1,868

Duke of Gloucester. Nor his?

Simpcox. No, indeed, master.


15

II,1,870

Duke of Gloucester. What's thine own name?

Simpcox. Saunder Simpcox, an if it please you, master.


16

II,1,880

Duke of Gloucester. Then, Saunder, sit there, the lyingest knave in
Christendom. If thou hadst been born blind, thou
mightest as well have known all our names as thus to
name the several colours we do wear. Sight may
distinguish of colours, but suddenly to nominate them
all, it is impossible. My lords, Saint Alban here
hath done a miracle; and would ye not think his
cunning to be great, that could restore this cripple
to his legs again?

Simpcox. O master, that you could!


17

II,1,890

Duke of Gloucester. Now fetch me a stool hither by and by. Now, sirrah,
if you mean to save yourself from whipping, leap me
over this stool and run away.

Simpcox. Alas, master, I am not able to stand alone:
You go about to torture me in vain.


18

II,1,897

Beadle. I will, my lord. Come on, sirrah; off with your
doublet quickly.

Simpcox. Alas, master, what shall I do? I am not able to stand.
[After the Beadle hath hit him once, he leaps over]
the stool and runs away; and they follow and cry, 'A miracle!']


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