Speeches (Lines) for Simonides
in "Pericles"

Total: 42

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,2,749

Are the knights ready to begin the triumph?

2

II,2,752

Return them, we are ready; and our daughter,
In honour of whose birth these triumphs are,...

3

II,2,759

It's fit it should be so; for princes are
A model which heaven makes like to itself:...

4

II,2,768

Who is the first that doth prefer himself?

5

II,2,773

He loves you well that holds his life of you.
[The Second Knight passes over]...

6

II,2,781

And what's the third?

7

II,2,786

What is the fourth?

8

II,2,789

Which shows that beauty hath his power and will,
Which can as well inflame as it can kill.

9

II,2,796

And what's
The sixth and last, the which the knight himself...

10

II,2,802

A pretty moral;
From the dejected state wherein he is,...

11

II,2,813

Opinion's but a fool, that makes us scan
The outward habit by the inward man....

12

II,3,821

Knights,
To say you're welcome were superfluous....

13

II,3,833

Call it by what you will, the day is yours;
And here, I hope, is none that envies it....

14

II,3,842

Your presence glads our days: honour we love;
For who hates honour hates the gods above.

15

II,3,850

Sit, sir, sit.

16

II,3,856

He's but a country gentleman;
Has done no more than other knights have done;...

17

II,3,871

What, are you merry, knights?

18

II,3,873

Here, with a cup that's stored unto the brim,—
As you do love, fill to your mistress' lips,—...

19

II,3,877

Yet pause awhile:
Yon knight doth sit too melancholy,...

20

II,3,884

O, attend, my daughter:
Princes in this should live like gods above,...

21

II,3,896

How!
Do as I bid you, or you'll move me else.

22

II,3,899

And furthermore tell him, we desire to know of him,
Of whence he is, his name and parentage.

23

II,3,916

Now, by the gods, I pity his misfortune,
And will awake him from his melancholy....

24

II,3,933

O, that's as much as you would be denied
Of your fair courtesy....

25

II,3,945

Princes, it is too late to talk of love;
And that's the mark I know you level at:...

26

II,5,1015

Knights, from my daughter this I let you know,
That for this twelvemonth she'll not undertake...

27

II,5,1021

'Faith, by no means; she has so strictly tied
Her to her chamber, that 'tis impossible....

28

II,5,1028

So,
They are well dispatch'd; now to my daughter's letter:...

29

II,5,1040

To you as much, sir! I am beholding to you
For your sweet music this last night: I do...

30

II,5,1046

Sir, you are music's master.

31

II,5,1048

Let me ask you one thing:
What do you think of my daughter, sir?

32

II,5,1051

And she is fair too, is she not?

33

II,5,1053

Sir, my daughter thinks very well of you;
Ay, so well, that you must be her master,...

34

II,5,1057

She thinks not so; peruse this writing else.

35

II,5,1065

Thou hast bewitch'd my daughter, and thou art
A villain.

36

II,5,1071

Traitor, thou liest.

37

II,5,1073

Ay, traitor.

38

II,5,1076

[Aside] Now, by the gods, I do applaud his courage.

39

II,5,1083

No?
Here comes my daughter, she can witness it.

40

II,5,1092

Yea, mistress, are you so peremptory?
[Aside]...

41

II,5,1113

What, are you both agreed?

42

II,5,1115

It pleaseth me so well, that I will see you wed;
And then with what haste you can get you to bed.

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