Speeches (Lines) for Shylock
in "Merchant of Venice"

Total: 79

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,3,326

Three thousand ducats; well.

2

I,3,328

For three months; well.

3

I,3,330

Antonio shall become bound; well.

4

I,3,333

Three thousand ducats for three months and Antonio bound.

5

I,3,335

Antonio is a good man.

6

I,3,337

Oh, no, no, no, no: my meaning in saying he is a
good man is to have you understand me that he is...

7

I,3,351

I will be assured I may; and, that I may be assured,
I will bethink me. May I speak with Antonio?

8

I,3,354

Yes, to smell pork; to eat of the habitation which
your prophet the Nazarite conjured the devil into. I...

9

I,3,362

[Aside] How like a fawning publican he looks!
I hate him for he is a Christian,...

10

I,3,375

I am debating of my present store,
And, by the near guess of my memory,...

11

I,3,390

Ay, ay, three thousand ducats.

12

I,3,392

I had forgot; three months; you told me so.
Well then, your bond; and let me see; but hear you;...

13

I,3,397

When Jacob grazed his uncle Laban's sheep—
This Jacob from our holy Abram was,...

14

I,3,402

No, not take interest, not, as you would say,
Directly interest: mark what Jacob did....

15

I,3,422

I cannot tell; I make it breed as fast:
But note me, signior.

16

I,3,430

Three thousand ducats; 'tis a good round sum.
Three months from twelve; then, let me see; the rate—

17

I,3,433

Signior Antonio, many a time and oft
In the Rialto you have rated me...

18

I,3,464

Why, look you, how you storm!
I would be friends with you and have your love,...

19

I,3,471

This kindness will I show.
Go with me to a notary, seal me there...

20

I,3,488

O father Abram, what these Christians are,
Whose own hard dealings teaches them suspect...

21

I,3,500

Then meet me forthwith at the notary's;
Give him direction for this merry bond,...

22

II,5,847

Well, thou shalt see, thy eyes shall be thy judge,
The difference of old Shylock and Bassanio:—...

23

II,5,854

Who bids thee call? I do not bid thee call.

24

II,5,859

I am bid forth to supper, Jessica:
There are my keys. But wherefore should I go?...

25

II,5,869

So do I his.

26

II,5,876

What, are there masques? Hear you me, Jessica:
Lock up my doors; and when you hear the drum...

27

II,5,892

What says that fool of Hagar's offspring, ha?

28

II,5,894

The patch is kind enough, but a huge feeder;
Snail-slow in profit, and he sleeps by day...

29

III,1,1261

You know, none so well, none so well as you, of my
daughter's flight.

30

III,1,1268

She is damned for it.

31

III,1,1270

My own flesh and blood to rebel!

32

III,1,1272

I say, my daughter is my flesh and blood.

33

III,1,1278

There I have another bad match: a bankrupt, a
prodigal, who dare scarce show his head on the...

34

III,1,1287

To bait fish withal: if it will feed nothing else,
it will feed my revenge. He hath disgraced me, and...

35

III,1,1316

How now, Tubal! what news from Genoa? hast thou
found my daughter?

36

III,1,1319

Why, there, there, there, there! a diamond gone,
cost me two thousand ducats in Frankfort! The curse...

37

III,1,1335

What, what, what? ill luck, ill luck?

38

III,1,1337

I thank God, I thank God. Is't true, is't true?

39

III,1,1339

I thank thee, good Tubal: good news, good news!
ha, ha! where? in Genoa?

40

III,1,1343

Thou stickest a dagger in me: I shall never see my
gold again: fourscore ducats at a sitting!...

41

III,1,1348

I am very glad of it: I'll plague him; I'll torture
him: I am glad of it.

42

III,1,1352

Out upon her! Thou torturest me, Tubal: it was my
turquoise; I had it of Leah when I was a bachelor:...

43

III,1,1356

Nay, that's true, that's very true. Go, Tubal, fee
me an officer; bespeak him a fortnight before. I...

44

III,3,1708

Gaoler, look to him: tell not me of mercy;
This is the fool that lent out money gratis:...

45

III,3,1712

I'll have my bond; speak not against my bond:
I have sworn an oath that I will have my bond....

46

III,3,1720

I'll have my bond; I will not hear thee speak:
I'll have my bond; and therefore speak no more....

47

IV,1,1967

I have possess'd your grace of what I purpose;
And by our holy Sabbath have I sworn...

48

IV,1,1997

I am not bound to please thee with my answers.

49

IV,1,1999

Hates any man the thing he would not kill?

50

IV,1,2001

What, wouldst thou have a serpent sting thee twice?

51

IV,1,2017

What judgment shall I dread, doing
Were in six parts and every part a ducat,...

52

IV,1,2021

What judgment shall I dread, doing no wrong?
You have among you many a purchased slave,...

53

IV,1,2057

To cut the forfeiture from that bankrupt there.

54

IV,1,2062

No, none that thou hast wit enough to make.

55

IV,1,2074

Till thou canst rail the seal from off my bond,
Thou but offend'st thy lungs to speak so loud:...

56

IV,1,2115

Shylock is my name.

57

IV,1,2124

On what compulsion must I? tell me that.

58

IV,1,2147

My deeds upon my head! I crave the law,
The penalty and forfeit of my bond.

59

IV,1,2164

A Daniel come to judgment! yea, a Daniel!
O wise young judge, how I do honour thee!

60

IV,1,2167

Here 'tis, most reverend doctor, here it is.

61

IV,1,2169

An oath, an oath, I have an oath in heaven:
Shall I lay perjury upon my soul?...

62

IV,1,2177

When it is paid according to the tenor.
It doth appear you are a worthy judge;...

63

IV,1,2189

O noble judge! O excellent young man!

64

IV,1,2193

'Tis very true: O wise and upright judge!
How much more elder art thou than thy looks!

65

IV,1,2196

Ay, his breast:
So says the bond: doth it not, noble judge?...

66

IV,1,2201

I have them ready.

67

IV,1,2204

Is it so nominated in the bond?

68

IV,1,2207

I cannot find it; 'tis not in the bond.

69

IV,1,2240

These be the Christian husbands. I have a daughter;
Would any of the stock of Barrabas...

70

IV,1,2247

Most rightful judge!

71

IV,1,2250

Most learned judge! A sentence! Come, prepare!

72

IV,1,2260

Is that the law?

73

IV,1,2265

I take this offer, then; pay the bond thrice
And let the Christian go.

74

IV,1,2284

Give me my principal, and let me go.

75

IV,1,2290

Shall I not have barely my principal?

76

IV,1,2293

Why, then the devil give him good of it!
I'll stay no longer question.

77

IV,1,2323

Nay, take my life and all; pardon not that:
You take my house when you do take the prop...

78

IV,1,2343

I am content.

79

IV,1,2345

I pray you, give me leave to go from hence;
I am not well: send the deed after me,...

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