Speeches (Lines) for Servant
in "Julius Caesar"

Total: 11

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,2,977

(stage directions). Enter a Servant

Servant. My lord?


2

II,2,980

Caesar. Go bid the priests do present sacrifice
And bring me their opinions of success.

Servant. I will, my lord.


3

II,2,1016

Caesar. Cowards die many times before their deaths;
The valiant never taste of death but once.
Of all the wonders that I yet have heard.
It seems to me most strange that men should fear;
Seeing that death, a necessary end,
Will come when it will come.
[Re-enter Servant]
What say the augurers?

Servant. They would not have you to stir forth to-day.
Plucking the entrails of an offering forth,
They could not find a heart within the beast.


4

III,1,1340

Brutus. Soft! who comes here? A friend of Antony's.

Servant. Thus, Brutus, did my master bid me kneel:
Thus did Mark Antony bid me fall down;
And, being prostrate, thus he bade me say:
Brutus is noble, wise, valiant, and honest;
Caesar was mighty, bold, royal, and loving:
Say I love Brutus, and I honour him;
Say I fear'd Caesar, honour'd him and loved him.
If Brutus will vouchsafe that Antony
May safely come to him, and be resolved
How Caesar hath deserved to lie in death,
Mark Antony shall not love Caesar dead
So well as Brutus living; but will follow
The fortunes and affairs of noble Brutus
Thorough the hazards of this untrod state
With all true faith. So says my master Antony.


5

III,1,1360

Brutus. Thy master is a wise and valiant Roman;
I never thought him worse.
Tell him, so please him come unto this place,
He shall be satisfied; and, by my honour,
Depart untouch'd.

Servant. I'll fetch him presently.


6

III,1,1507

Antony. O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth,
That I am meek and gentle with these butchers!
Thou art the ruins of the noblest man
That ever lived in the tide of times.
Woe to the hand that shed this costly blood!
Over thy wounds now do I prophesy,—
Which, like dumb mouths, do ope their ruby lips,
To beg the voice and utterance of my tongue—
A curse shall light upon the limbs of men;
Domestic fury and fierce civil strife
Shall cumber all the parts of Italy;
Blood and destruction shall be so in use
And dreadful objects so familiar
That mothers shall but smile when they behold
Their infants quarter'd with the hands of war;
All pity choked with custom of fell deeds:
And Caesar's spirit, ranging for revenge,
With Ate by his side come hot from hell,
Shall in these confines with a monarch's voice
Cry 'Havoc,' and let slip the dogs of war;
That this foul deed shall smell above the earth
With carrion men, groaning for burial.
[Enter a Servant]
You serve Octavius Caesar, do you not?

Servant. I do, Mark Antony.


7

III,1,1509

Antony. Caesar did write for him to come to Rome.

Servant. He did receive his letters, and is coming;
And bid me say to you by word of mouth—
O Caesar!—


8

III,1,1517

Antony. Thy heart is big, get thee apart and weep.
Passion, I see, is catching; for mine eyes,
Seeing those beads of sorrow stand in thine,
Began to water. Is thy master coming?

Servant. He lies to-night within seven leagues of Rome.


9

III,2,1810

Antony. Now let it work. Mischief, thou art afoot,
Take thou what course thou wilt!
[Enter a Servant]
How now, fellow!

Servant. Sir, Octavius is already come to Rome.


10

III,2,1812

Antony. Where is he?

Servant. He and Lepidus are at Caesar's house.


11

III,2,1816

Antony. And thither will I straight to visit him:
He comes upon a wish. Fortune is merry,
And in this mood will give us any thing.

Servant. I heard him say, Brutus and Cassius
Are rid like madmen through the gates of Rome.


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