Speeches (Lines) for Second Servingman
in "Coriolanus"

Total: 19

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

IV,5,2754

(stage directions). [Enter a second Servingman]

Second Servingman. Where's Cotus? my master calls
for him. Cotus!


2

IV,5,2767

(stage directions). [Re-enter second Servingman]

Second Servingman. Whence are you, sir? Has the porter his eyes in his
head; that he gives entrance to such companions?
Pray, get you out.


3

IV,5,2771

Coriolanus. Away!

Second Servingman. Away! get you away.


4

IV,5,2773

Coriolanus. Now thou'rt troublesome.

Second Servingman. Are you so brave? I'll have you talked with anon.


5

IV,5,2792

Third Servingman. What, you will not? Prithee, tell my master what a
strange guest he has here.

Second Servingman. And I shall.


6

IV,5,2810

Tullus Aufidius. Where is this fellow?

Second Servingman. Here, sir: I'ld have beaten him like a dog, but for
disturbing the lords within.


7

IV,5,2919

First Servingman. Here's a strange alteration!

Second Servingman. By my hand, I had thought to have strucken him with
a cudgel; and yet my mind gave me his clothes made a
false report of him.


8

IV,5,2924

First Servingman. What an arm he has! he turned me about with his
finger and his thumb, as one would set up a top.

Second Servingman. Nay, I knew by his face that there was something in
him: he had, sir, a kind of face, methought,—I
cannot tell how to term it.


9

IV,5,2929

First Servingman. He had so; looking as it were—would I were hanged,
but I thought there was more in him than I could think.

Second Servingman. So did I, I'll be sworn: he is simply the rarest
man i' the world.


10

IV,5,2932

First Servingman. I think he is: but a greater soldier than he you wot on.

Second Servingman. Who, my master?


11

IV,5,2934

First Servingman. Nay, it's no matter for that.

Second Servingman. Worth six on him.


12

IV,5,2937

First Servingman. Nay, not so neither: but I take him to be the
greater soldier.

Second Servingman. Faith, look you, one cannot tell how to say that:
for the defence of a town, our general is excellent.


13

IV,5,2943

First Servingman. [together] What, what, what? let's partake.

Second Servingman. [together] What, what, what? let's partake.


14

IV,5,2947

First Servingman. [together] Wherefore? wherefore?

Second Servingman. [together] wherefore?


15

IV,5,2953

Third Servingman. I do not say 'thwack our general;' but he was always
good enough for him.

Second Servingman. Come, we are fellows and friends: he was ever too
hard for him; I have heard him say so himself.


16

IV,5,2958

First Servingman. He was too hard for him directly, to say the troth
on't: before Corioli he scotched him and notched
him like a carbon ado.

Second Servingman. An he had been cannibally given, he might have
broiled and eaten him too.


17

IV,5,2973

Third Servingman. Why, he is so made on here within, as if he were son
and heir to Mars; set at upper end o' the table; no
question asked him by any of the senators, but they
stand bald before him: our general himself makes a
mistress of him: sanctifies himself with's hand and
turns up the white o' the eye to his discourse. But
the bottom of the news is that our general is cut i'
the middle and but one half of what he was
yesterday; for the other has half, by the entreaty
and grant of the whole table. He'll go, he says,
and sowl the porter of Rome gates by the ears: he
will mow all down before him, and leave his passage polled.

Second Servingman. And he's as like to do't as any man I can imagine.


18

IV,5,2988

Third Servingman. To-morrow; to-day; presently; you shall have the
drum struck up this afternoon: 'tis, as it were, a
parcel of their feast, and to be executed ere they
wipe their lips.

Second Servingman. Why, then we shall have a stirring world again.
This peace is nothing, but to rust iron, increase
tailors, and breed ballad-makers.


19

IV,5,2996

First Servingman. Let me have war, say I; it exceeds peace as far as
day does night; it's spritely, waking, audible, and
full of vent. Peace is a very apoplexy, lethargy;
mulled, deaf, sleepy, insensible; a getter of more
bastard children than war's a destroyer of men.

Second Servingman. 'Tis so: and as war, in some sort, may be said to
be a ravisher, so it cannot be denied but peace is a
great maker of cuckolds.


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