Speeches (Lines) for Second Lord
in "All's Well That Ends Well"

Total: 57

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,253

It well may serve
A nursery to our gentry, who are sick
For breathing and exploit.

2

I,2,310

You are loved, sir:
They that least lend it you shall lack you first.

3

II,1,611

Health, at your bidding, serve your majesty!

4

II,1,621

O, 'tis brave wars!

5

II,1,632

I am your accessary; and so, farewell.

6

II,1,635

Sweet Monsieur Parolles!

7

II,3,982

No better, if you please.

8

III,1,1379

Good my lord,
The reasons of our state I cannot yield,
But like a common and an outward man,
That the great figure of a council frames
By self-unable motion: therefore dare not
Say what I think of it, since I have found
Myself in my incertain grounds to fail
As often as I guess'd.

9

III,6,1729

Nay, good my lord, put him to't; let him have his
way.

10

III,6,1733

On my life, my lord, a bubble.

11

III,6,1735

Believe it, my lord, in mine own direct knowledge,
without any malice, but to speak of him as my
kinsman, he's a most notable coward, an infinite and
endless liar, an hourly promise-breaker, the owner
of no one good quality worthy your lordship's
entertainment.

12

III,6,1747

I, with a troop of Florentines, will suddenly
surprise him; such I will have, whom I am sure he
knows not from the enemy: we will bind and hoodwink
him so, that he shall suppose no other but that he
is carried into the leaguer of the adversaries, when
we bring him to our own tents. Be but your lordship
present at his examination: if he do not, for the
promise of his life and in the highest compulsion of
base fear, offer to betray you and deliver all the
intelligence in his power against you, and that with
the divine forfeit of his soul upon oath, never
trust my judgment in any thing.

13

III,6,1767

[Aside to BERTRAM] O, for the love of laughter,
hinder not the honour of his design: let him fetch
off his drum in any hand.

14

III,6,1811

No more than a fish loves water. Is not this a
strange fellow, my lord, that so confidently seems
to undertake this business, which he knows is not to
be done; damns himself to do and dares better be
damned than to do't?

15

III,6,1822

None in the world; but return with an invention and
clap upon you two or three probable lies: but we
have almost embossed him; you shall see his fall
to-night; for indeed he is not for your lordship's respect.

16

III,6,1831

I must go look my twigs: he shall be caught.

17

III,6,1833

As't please your lordship: I'll leave you.

18

IV,1,1904

He can come no other way but by this hedge-corner.
When you sally upon him, speak what terrible
language you will: though you understand it not
yourselves, no matter; for we must not seem to
understand him, unless some one among us whom we
must produce for an interpreter.

19

IV,1,1911

Art not acquainted with him? knows he not thy voice?

20

IV,1,1913

But what linsey-woolsey hast thou to speak to us again?

21

IV,1,1915

He must think us some band of strangers i' the
adversary's entertainment. Now he hath a smack of
all neighbouring languages; therefore we must every
one be a man of his own fancy, not to know what we
speak one to another; so we seem to know, is to
know straight our purpose: choughs' language,
gabble enough, and good enough. As for you,
interpreter, you must seem very politic. But couch,
ho! here he comes, to beguile two hours in a sleep,
and then to return and swear the lies he forges.

22

IV,1,1934

This is the first truth that e'er thine own tongue
was guilty of.

23

IV,1,1946

Is it possible he should know what he is, and be
that he is?

24

IV,1,1950

We cannot afford you so.

25

IV,1,1953

'Twould not do.

26

IV,1,1955

Hardly serve.

27

IV,1,1957

How deep?

28

IV,1,1959

Three great oaths would scarce make that be believed.

29

IV,1,1962

You shall hear one anon.

30

IV,1,1965

Throca movousus, cargo, cargo, cargo.

31

IV,1,1980

Oscorbidulchos volivorco.

32

IV,1,1994

Go, tell the Count Rousillon, and my brother,
We have caught the woodcock, and will keep him muffled
Till we do hear from them.

33

IV,1,1998

A' will betray us all unto ourselves:
Inform on that.

34

IV,1,2001

Till then I'll keep him dark and safely lock'd.

35

IV,3,2094

I have delivered it an hour since: there is
something in't that stings his nature; for on the
reading it he changed almost into another man.

36

IV,3,2099

Especially he hath incurred the everlasting
displeasure of the king, who had even tuned his
bounty to sing happiness to him. I will tell you a
thing, but you shall let it dwell darkly with you.

37

IV,3,2105

He hath perverted a young gentlewoman here in
Florence, of a most chaste renown; and this night he
fleshes his will in the spoil of her honour: he hath
given her his monumental ring, and thinks himself
made in the unchaste composition.

38

IV,3,2112

Merely our own traitors. And as in the common course
of all treasons, we still see them reveal
themselves, till they attain to their abhorred ends,
so he that in this action contrives against his own
nobility, in his proper stream o'erflows himself.

39

IV,3,2120

Not till after midnight; for he is dieted to his hour.

40

IV,3,2125

We will not meddle with him till he come; for his
presence must be the whip of the other.

41

IV,3,2128

I hear there is an overture of peace.

42

IV,3,2130

What will Count Rousillon do then? will he travel
higher, or return again into France?

43

IV,3,2134

Let it be forbid, sir; so should I be a great deal
of his act.

44

IV,3,2143

How is this justified?

45

IV,3,2149

Hath the count all this intelligence?

46

IV,3,2152

I am heartily sorry that he'll be glad of this.

47

IV,3,2154

And how mightily some other times we drown our gain
in tears! The great dignity that his valour hath
here acquired for him shall at home be encountered
with a shame as ample.

48

IV,3,2168

They shall be no more than needful there, if they
were more than they can commend.

49

IV,3,2182

If the business be of any difficulty, and this
morning your departure hence, it requires haste of
your lordship.

50

IV,3,2190

Bring him forth: has sat i' the stocks all night,
poor gallant knave.

51

IV,3,2194

I have told your lordship already, the stocks carry
him. But to answer you as you would be understood;
he weeps like a wench that had shed her milk: he
hath confessed himself to Morgan, whom he supposes
to be a friar, from the time of his remembrance to
this very instant disaster of his setting i' the
stocks: and what think you he hath confessed?

52

IV,3,2202

His confession is taken, and it shall be read to his
face: if your lordship be in't, as I believe you
are, you must have the patience to hear it.

53

IV,3,2232

I will never trust a man again for keeping his sword
clean. nor believe he can have every thing in him
by wearing his apparel neatly.

54

IV,3,2318

This is your devoted friend, sir, the manifold
linguist and the armipotent soldier.

55

IV,3,2365

Why does be ask him of me?

56

IV,3,2393

God bless you, Captain Parolles.

57

IV,3,2395

Captain, what greeting will you to my Lord Lafeu?
I am for France.

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