Speeches (Lines) for Lord Ross
in "Richard II"

Total: 11

---
# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,1,916

Earl of Northumberland. Well, lords, the Duke of Lancaster is dead.

Lord Ross. And living too; for now his son is duke.


2

II,1,919

Earl of Northumberland. Richly in both, if justice had her right.

Lord Ross. My heart is great; but it must break with silence,
Ere't be disburden'd with a liberal tongue.


3

II,1,926

Lord Willoughby. Tends that thou wouldst speak to the Duke of Hereford?
If it be so, out with it boldly, man;
Quick is mine ear to hear of good towards him.

Lord Ross. No good at all that I can do for him;
Unless you call it good to pity him,
Bereft and gelded of his patrimony.


4

II,1,937

Earl of Northumberland. Now, afore God, 'tis shame such wrongs are borne
In him, a royal prince, and many moe
Of noble blood in this declining land.
The king is not himself, but basely led
By flatterers; and what they will inform,
Merely in hate, 'gainst any of us all,
That will the king severely prosecute
'Gainst us, our lives, our children, and our heirs.

Lord Ross. The commons hath he pill'd with grievous taxes,
And quite lost their hearts: the nobles hath he fined
For ancient quarrels, and quite lost their hearts.


5

II,1,947

Earl of Northumberland. Wars have not wasted it, for warr'd he hath not,
But basely yielded upon compromise
That which his noble ancestors achieved with blows:
More hath he spent in peace than they in wars.

Lord Ross. The Earl of Wiltshire hath the realm in farm.


6

II,1,950

Earl of Northumberland. Reproach and dissolution hangeth over him.

Lord Ross. He hath not money for these Irish wars,
His burthenous taxations notwithstanding,
But by the robbing of the banish'd duke.


7

II,1,958

Earl of Northumberland. His noble kinsman: most degenerate king!
But, lords, we hear this fearful tempest sing,
Yet see no shelter to avoid the storm;
We see the wind sit sore upon our sails,
And yet we strike not, but securely perish.

Lord Ross. We see the very wreck that we must suffer;
And unavoided is the danger now,
For suffering so the causes of our wreck.


8

II,1,965

Lord Willoughby. Nay, let us share thy thoughts, as thou dost ours.

Lord Ross. Be confident to speak, Northumberland:
We three are but thyself; and, speaking so,
Thy words are but as thoughts; therefore, be bold.


9

II,1,990

Earl of Northumberland. Then thus: I have from Port le Blanc, a bay
In Brittany, received intelligence
That Harry Duke of Hereford, Rainold Lord Cobham,
[—]
That late broke from the Duke of Exeter,
His brother, Archbishop late of Canterbury,
Sir Thomas Erpingham, Sir John Ramston,
Sir John Norbery, Sir Robert Waterton and Francis Quoint,
All these well furnish'd by the Duke of Bretagne
With eight tall ships, three thousand men of war,
Are making hither with all due expedience
And shortly mean to touch our northern shore:
Perhaps they had ere this, but that they stay
The first departing of the king for Ireland.
If then we shall shake off our slavish yoke,
Imp out our drooping country's broken wing,
Redeem from broking pawn the blemish'd crown,
Wipe off the dust that hides our sceptre's gilt
And make high majesty look like itself,
Away with me in post to Ravenspurgh;
But if you faint, as fearing to do so,
Stay and be secret, and myself will go.

Lord Ross. To horse, to horse! urge doubts to them that fear.


10

II,3,1218

Henry IV. Welcome, my lords. I wot your love pursues
A banish'd traitor: all my treasury
Is yet but unfelt thanks, which more enrich'd
Shall be your love and labour's recompense.

Lord Ross. Your presence makes us rich, most noble lord.


11

II,3,1296

Earl of Northumberland. The noble duke hath been too much abused.

Lord Ross. It stands your grace upon to do him right.


Return to the "Richard II" menu

Plays + Sonnets + Poems + Concordance + Character Search + Advanced Search + About OSS