Speeches (Lines) for Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester)
in "Henry VI, Part II"

Total: 58

---
# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,131

Earl of Warwick. For grief that they are past recovery:
For, were there hope to conquer them again,
My sword should shed hot blood, mine eyes no tears.
Anjou and Maine! myself did win them both;
Those provinces these arms of mine did conquer:
And are the cities, that I got with wounds,
Delivered up again with peaceful words?
Mort Dieu!

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). For Suffolk's duke, may he be suffocate,
That dims the honour of this warlike isle!
France should have torn and rent my very heart,
Before I would have yielded to this league.
I never read but England's kings have had
Large sums of gold and dowries with their wives:
And our King Henry gives away his own,
To match with her that brings no vantages.


2

I,1,218

Earl of Warwick. So God help Warwick, as he loves the land,
And common profit of his country!

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). [Aside] And so says York, for he hath greatest cause.


3

I,1,226

(stage directions). [Exeunt WARWICK and SALISBURY]

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Anjou and Maine are given to the French;
Paris is lost; the state of Normandy
Stands on a tickle point, now they are gone:
Suffolk concluded on the articles,
The peers agreed, and Henry was well pleased
To change two dukedoms for a duke's fair daughter.
I cannot blame them all: what is't to them?
'Tis thine they give away, and not their own.
Pirates may make cheap pennyworths of their pillage
And purchase friends and give to courtezans,
Still revelling like lords till all be gone;
While as the silly owner of the goods
Weeps over them and wrings his hapless hands
And shakes his head and trembling stands aloof,
While all is shared and all is borne away,
Ready to starve and dare not touch his own:
So York must sit and fret and bite his tongue,
While his own lands are bargain'd for and sold.
Methinks the realms of England, France and Ireland
Bear that proportion to my flesh and blood
As did the fatal brand Althaea burn'd
Unto the prince's heart of Calydon.
Anjou and Maine both given unto the French!
Cold news for me, for I had hope of France,
Even as I have of fertile England's soil.
A day will come when York shall claim his own;
And therefore I will take the Nevils' parts
And make a show of love to proud Duke Humphrey,
And, when I spy advantage, claim the crown,
For that's the golden mark I seek to hit:
Nor shall proud Lancaster usurp my right,
Nor hold the sceptre in his childish fist,
Nor wear the diadem upon his head,
Whose church-like humours fits not for a crown.
Then, York, be still awhile, till time do serve:
Watch thou and wake when others be asleep,
To pry into the secrets of the state;
Till Henry, surfeiting in joys of love,
With his new bride and England's dear-bought queen,
And Humphrey with the peers be fall'n at jars:
Then will I raise aloft the milk-white rose,
With whose sweet smell the air shall be perfumed;
And in my standard bear the arms of York
To grapple with the house of Lancaster;
And, force perforce, I'll make him yield the crown,
Whose bookish rule hath pull'd fair England down.


4

I,3,497

Henry VI. For my part, noble lords, I care not which;
Or Somerset or York, all's one to me.

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). If York have ill demean'd himself in France,
Then let him be denay'd the regentship.


5

I,3,564

Earl of Suffolk. Before we make election, give me leave
To show some reason, of no little force,
That York is most unmeet of any man.

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). I'll tell thee, Suffolk, why I am unmeet:
First, for I cannot flatter thee in pride;
Next, if I be appointed for the place,
My Lord of Somerset will keep me here,
Without discharge, money, or furniture,
Till France be won into the Dauphin's hands:
Last time, I danced attendance on his will
Till Paris was besieged, famish'd, and lost.


6

I,3,580

Earl of Suffolk. Because here is a man accused of treason:
Pray God the Duke of York excuse himself!

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Doth any one accuse York for a traitor?


7

I,3,594

Peter. By these ten bones, my lords, he did speak them to
me in the garret one night, as we were scouring my
Lord of York's armour.

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Base dunghill villain and mechanical,
I'll have thy head for this thy traitor's speech.
I do beseech your royal majesty,
Let him have all the rigor of the law.


8

I,4,677

Bolingbroke. Descend to darkness and the burning lake!
False fiend, avoid!
[Thunder and lightning. Exit Spirit]
[Enter YORK and BUCKINGHAM with their Guard]
and break in]

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Lay hands upon these traitors and their trash.
Beldam, I think we watch'd you at an inch.
What, madam, are you there? the king and commonweal
Are deeply indebted for this piece of pains:
My lord protector will, I doubt it not,
See you well guerdon'd for these good deserts.


9

I,4,693

(stage directions). [Exeunt guard with MARGARET JOURDAIN, SOUTHWELL, &c]

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Lord Buckingham, methinks, you watch'd her well:
A pretty plot, well chosen to build upon!
Now, pray, my lord, let's see the devil's writ.
What have we here?
[Reads]
'The duke yet lives, that Henry shall depose;
But him outlive, and die a violent death.'
Why, this is just
'Aio te, AEacida, Romanos vincere posse.'
Well, to the rest:
'Tell me what fate awaits the Duke of Suffolk?
By water shall he die, and take his end.
What shall betide the Duke of Somerset?
Let him shun castles;
Safer shall he be upon the sandy plains
Than where castles mounted stand.'
Come, come, my lords;
These oracles are hardly attain'd,
And hardly understood.
The king is now in progress towards Saint Alban's,
With him the husband of this lovely lady:
Thither go these news, as fast as horse can
carry them:
A sorry breakfast for my lord protector.


10

I,4,719

Duke of Buckingham. Your grace shall give me leave, my Lord of York,
To be the post, in hope of his reward.

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). At your pleasure, my good lord. Who's within
there, ho!
[Enter a Servingman]
Invite my Lords of Salisbury and Warwick
To sup with me to-morrow night. Away!


11

II,2,956

(stage directions). [Enter YORK, SALISBURY, and WARWICK]

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Now, my good Lords of Salisbury and Warwick,
Our simple supper ended, give me leave
In this close walk to satisfy myself,
In craving your opinion of my title,
Which is infallible, to England's crown.


12

II,2,964

Earl of Warwick. Sweet York, begin: and if thy claim be good,
The Nevils are thy subjects to command.

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Then thus:
Edward the Third, my lords, had seven sons:
The first, Edward the Black Prince, Prince of Wales;
The second, William of Hatfield, and the third,
Lionel Duke of Clarence: next to whom
Was John of Gaunt, the Duke of Lancaster;
The fifth was Edmund Langley, Duke of York;
The sixth was Thomas of Woodstock, Duke of Gloucester;
William of Windsor was the seventh and last.
Edward the Black Prince died before his father
And left behind him Richard, his only son,
Who after Edward the Third's death reign'd as king;
Till Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Lancaster,
The eldest son and heir of John of Gaunt,
Crown'd by the name of Henry the Fourth,
Seized on the realm, deposed the rightful king,
Sent his poor queen to France, from whence she came,
And him to Pomfret; where, as all you know,
Harmless Richard was murder'd traitorously.


13

II,2,985

Earl of Warwick. Father, the duke hath told the truth:
Thus got the house of Lancaster the crown.

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Which now they hold by force and not by right;
For Richard, the first son's heir, being dead,
The issue of the next son should have reign'd.


14

II,2,989

Earl of Salisbury. But William of Hatfield died without an heir.

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). The third son, Duke of Clarence, from whose line
I claimed the crown, had issue, Philippe, a daughter,
Who married Edmund Mortimer, Earl of March:
Edmund had issue, Roger Earl of March;
Roger had issue, Edmund, Anne and Eleanor.


15

II,2,999

Earl of Salisbury. This Edmund, in the reign of Bolingbroke,
As I have read, laid claim unto the crown;
And, but for Owen Glendower, had been king,
Who kept him in captivity till he died.
But to the rest.

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). His eldest sister, Anne,
My mother, being heir unto the crown
Married Richard Earl of Cambridge; who was son
To Edmund Langley, Edward the Third's fifth son.
By her I claim the kingdom: she was heir
To Roger Earl of March, who was the son
Of Edmund Mortimer, who married Philippe,
Sole daughter unto Lionel Duke of Clarence:
So, if the issue of the elder son
Succeed before the younger, I am king.


16

II,2,1020

Both. Long live our sovereign Richard, England's king!

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). We thank you, lords. But I am not your king
Till I be crown'd and that my sword be stain'd
With heart-blood of the house of Lancaster;
And that's not suddenly to be perform'd,
But with advice and silent secrecy.
Do you as I do in these dangerous days:
Wink at the Duke of Suffolk's insolence,
At Beaufort's pride, at Somerset's ambition,
At Buckingham and all the crew of them,
Till they have snared the shepherd of the flock,
That virtuous prince, the good Duke Humphrey:
'Tis that they seek, and they in seeking that
Shall find their deaths, if York can prophesy.


17

II,2,1036

Earl of Warwick. My heart assures me that the Earl of Warwick
Shall one day make the Duke of York a king.

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). And, Nevil, this I do assure myself:
Richard shall live to make the Earl of Warwick
The greatest man in England but the king.


18

II,3,1092

Earl of Suffolk. Thus droops this lofty pine and hangs his sprays;
Thus Eleanor's pride dies in her youngest days.

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Lords, let him go. Please it your majesty,
This is the day appointed for the combat;
And ready are the appellant and defendant,
The armourer and his man, to enter the lists,
So please your highness to behold the fight.


19

II,3,1101

Henry VI. O God's name, see the lists and all things fit:
Here let them end it; and God defend the right!

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). I never saw a fellow worse bested,
Or more afraid to fight, than is the appellant,
The servant of this armourer, my lords.
[Enter at one door, HORNER, the Armourer, and his]
Neighbours, drinking to him so much that he is drunk;
and he enters with a drum before him and his staff
with a sand-bag fastened to it; and at the other
door PETER, his man, with a drum and sand-bag, and
'Prentices drinking to him]


20

II,3,1139

Thomas Horner. Masters, I am come hither, as it were, upon my man's
instigation, to prove him a knave and myself an
honest man: and touching the Duke of York, I will
take my death, I never meant him any ill, nor the
king, nor the queen: and therefore, Peter, have at
thee with a downright blow!

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Dispatch: this knave's tongue begins to double.
Sound, trumpets, alarum to the combatants!


21

II,3,1144

(stage directions). [Dies]

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Take away his weapon. Fellow, thank God, and the
good wine in thy master's way.


22

III,1,1337

Winchester. Did he not, contrary to form of law,
Devise strange deaths for small offences done?

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). And did he not, in his protectorship,
Levy great sums of money through the realm
For soldiers' pay in France, and never sent it?
By means whereof the towns each day revolted.


23

III,1,1366

Henry VI. Cold news, Lord Somerset: but God's will be done!

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). [Aside] Cold news for me; for I had hope of France
As firmly as I hope for fertile England.
Thus are my blossoms blasted in the bud
And caterpillars eat my leaves away;
But I will remedy this gear ere long,
Or sell my title for a glorious grave.


24

III,1,1384

Duke of Gloucester. Well, Suffolk, thou shalt not see me blush
Nor change my countenance for this arrest:
A heart unspotted is not easily daunted.
The purest spring is not so free from mud
As I am clear from treason to my sovereign:
Who can accuse me? wherein am I guilty?

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). 'Tis thought, my lord, that you took bribes of France,
And, being protector, stayed the soldiers' pay;
By means whereof his highness hath lost France.


25

III,1,1401

Duke of Gloucester. I say no more than truth, so help me God!

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). In your protectorship you did devise
Strange tortures for offenders never heard of,
That England was defamed by tyranny.


26

III,1,1527

Earl of Suffolk. But, in my mind, that were no policy:
The king will labour still to save his life,
The commons haply rise, to save his life;
And yet we have but trivial argument,
More than mistrust, that shows him worthy death.

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). So that, by this, you would not have him die.


27

III,1,1529

Earl of Suffolk. Ah, York, no man alive so fain as I!

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). 'Tis York that hath more reason for his death.
But, my lord cardinal, and you, my Lord of Suffolk,
Say as you think, and speak it from your souls,
Were't not all one, an empty eagle were set
To guard the chicken from a hungry kite,
As place Duke Humphrey for the king's protector?


28

III,1,1564

Queen Margaret. And so say I.

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). And I and now we three have spoke it,
It skills not greatly who impugns our doom.


29

III,1,1575

Winchester. A breach that craves a quick expedient stop!
What counsel give you in this weighty cause?

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). That Somerset be sent as regent thither:
'Tis meet that lucky ruler be employ'd;
Witness the fortune he hath had in France.


30

III,1,1581

Duke/Earl of Somerset. If York, with all his far-fet policy,
Had been the regent there instead of me,
He never would have stay'd in France so long.

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). No, not to lose it all, as thou hast done:
I rather would have lost my life betimes
Than bring a burthen of dishonour home
By staying there so long till all were lost.
Show me one scar character'd on thy skin:
Men's flesh preserved so whole do seldom win.


31

III,1,1592

Queen Margaret. Nay, then, this spark will prove a raging fire,
If wind and fuel be brought to feed it with:
No more, good York; sweet Somerset, be still:
Thy fortune, York, hadst thou been regent there,
Might happily have proved far worse than his.

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). What, worse than nought? nay, then, a shame take all!


32

III,1,1600

Winchester. My Lord of York, try what your fortune is.
The uncivil kerns of Ireland are in arms
And temper clay with blood of Englishmen:
To Ireland will you lead a band of men,
Collected choicely, from each county some,
And try your hap against the Irishmen?

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). I will, my lord, so please his majesty.


33

III,1,1604

Earl of Suffolk. Why, our authority is his consent,
And what we do establish he confirms:
Then, noble York, take thou this task in hand.

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). I am content: provide me soldiers, lords,
Whiles I take order for mine own affairs.


34

III,1,1612

Winchester. No more of him; for I will deal with him
That henceforth he shall trouble us no more.
And so break off; the day is almost spent:
Lord Suffolk, you and I must talk of that event.

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). My Lord of Suffolk, within fourteen days
At Bristol I expect my soldiers;
For there I'll ship them all for Ireland.


35

III,1,1617

(stage directions). [Exeunt all but YORK]

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Now, York, or never, steel thy fearful thoughts,
And change misdoubt to resolution:
Be that thou hopest to be, or what thou art
Resign to death; it is not worth the enjoying:
Let pale-faced fear keep with the mean-born man,
And find no harbour in a royal heart.
Faster than spring-time showers comes thought
on thought,
And not a thought but thinks on dignity.
My brain more busy than the labouring spider
Weaves tedious snares to trap mine enemies.
Well, nobles, well, 'tis politicly done,
To send me packing with an host of men:
I fear me you but warm the starved snake,
Who, cherish'd in your breasts, will sting
your hearts.
'Twas men I lack'd and you will give them me:
I take it kindly; and yet be well assured
You put sharp weapons in a madman's hands.
Whiles I in Ireland nourish a mighty band,
I will stir up in England some black storm
Shall blow ten thousand souls to heaven or hell;
And this fell tempest shall not cease to rage
Until the golden circuit on my head,
Like to the glorious sun's transparent beams,
Do calm the fury of this mad-bred flaw.
And, for a minister of my intent,
I have seduced a headstrong Kentishman,
John Cade of Ashford,
To make commotion, as full well he can,
Under the title of John Mortimer.
In Ireland have I seen this stubborn Cade
Oppose himself against a troop of kerns,
And fought so long, till that his thighs with darts
Were almost like a sharp-quill'd porpentine;
And, in the end being rescued, I have seen
Him caper upright like a wild Morisco,
Shaking the bloody darts as he his bells.
Full often, like a shag-hair'd crafty kern,
Hath he conversed with the enemy,
And undiscover'd come to me again
And given me notice of their villanies.
This devil here shall be my substitute;
For that John Mortimer, which now is dead,
In face, in gait, in speech, he doth resemble:
By this I shall perceive the commons' mind,
How they affect the house and claim of York.
Say he be taken, rack'd and tortured,
I know no pain they can inflict upon him
Will make him say I moved him to those arms.
Say that he thrive, as 'tis great like he will,
Why, then from Ireland come I with my strength
And reap the harvest which that rascal sow'd;
For Humphrey being dead, as he shall be,
And Henry put apart, the next for me.


36

V,1,2977

(stage directions). [Enter YORK, and his army of Irish, with drum]
and colours]

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). From Ireland thus comes York to claim his right,
And pluck the crown from feeble Henry's head:
Ring, bells, aloud; burn, bonfires, clear and bright,
To entertain great England's lawful king.
Ah! sancta majestas, who would not buy thee dear?
Let them obey that know not how to rule;
This hand was made to handle naught but gold.
I cannot give due action to my words,
Except a sword or sceptre balance it:
A sceptre shall it have, have I a soul,
On which I'll toss the flower-de-luce of France.
[Enter BUCKINGHAM]
Whom have we here? Buckingham, to disturb me?
The king hath sent him, sure: I must dissemble.


37

V,1,2992

Duke of Buckingham. York, if thou meanest well, I greet thee well.

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Humphrey of Buckingham, I accept thy greeting.
Art thou a messenger, or come of pleasure?


38

V,1,3000

Duke of Buckingham. A messenger from Henry, our dread liege,
To know the reason of these arms in peace;
Or why thou, being a subject as I am,
Against thy oath and true allegiance sworn,
Should raise so great a power without his leave,
Or dare to bring thy force so near the court.

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). [Aside] Scarce can I speak, my choler is so great:
O, I could hew up rocks and fight with flint,
I am so angry at these abject terms;
And now, like Ajax Telamonius,
On sheep or oxen could I spend my fury.
I am far better born than is the king,
More like a king, more kingly in my thoughts:
But I must make fair weather yet a while,
Till Henry be more weak and I more strong,—
Buckingham, I prithee, pardon me,
That I have given no answer all this while;
My mind was troubled with deep melancholy.
The cause why I have brought this army hither
Is to remove proud Somerset from the king,
Seditious to his grace and to the state.


39

V,1,3019

Duke of Buckingham. That is too much presumption on thy part:
But if thy arms be to no other end,
The king hath yielded unto thy demand:
The Duke of Somerset is in the Tower.

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Upon thine honour, is he prisoner?


40

V,1,3021

Duke of Buckingham. Upon mine honour, he is prisoner.

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Then, Buckingham, I do dismiss my powers.
Soldiers, I thank you all; disperse yourselves;
Meet me to-morrow in St. George's field,
You shall have pay and every thing you wish.
And let my sovereign, virtuous Henry,
Command my eldest son, nay, all my sons,
As pledges of my fealty and love;
I'll send them all as willing as I live:
Lands, goods, horse, armour, any thing I have,
Is his to use, so Somerset may die.


41

V,1,3036

Henry VI. Buckingham, doth York intend no harm to us,
That thus he marcheth with thee arm in arm?

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). In all submission and humility
York doth present himself unto your highness.


42

V,1,3039

Henry VI. Then what intends these forces thou dost bring?

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). To heave the traitor Somerset from hence,
And fight against that monstrous rebel Cade,
Who since I heard to be discomfited.


43

V,1,3070

Queen Margaret. For thousand Yorks he shall not hide his head,
But boldly stand and front him to his face.

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). How now! is Somerset at liberty?
Then, York, unloose thy long-imprison'd thoughts,
And let thy tongue be equal with thy heart.
Shall I endure the sight of Somerset?
False king! why hast thou broken faith with me,
Knowing how hardly I can brook abuse?
King did I call thee? no, thou art not king,
Not fit to govern and rule multitudes,
Which darest not, no, nor canst not rule a traitor.
That head of thine doth not become a crown;
Thy hand is made to grasp a palmer's staff,
And not to grace an awful princely sceptre.
That gold must round engirt these brows of mine,
Whose smile and frown, like to Achilles' spear,
Is able with the change to kill and cure.
Here is a hand to hold a sceptre up
And with the same to act controlling laws.
Give place: by heaven, thou shalt rule no more
O'er him whom heaven created for thy ruler.


44

V,1,3092

Duke/Earl of Somerset. O monstrous traitor! I arrest thee, York,
Of capital treason 'gainst the king and crown;
Obey, audacious traitor; kneel for grace.

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Wouldst have me kneel? first let me ask of these,
If they can brook I bow a knee to man.
Sirrah, call in my sons to be my bail;
[Exit Attendant]
I know, ere they will have me go to ward,
They'll pawn their swords for my enfranchisement.


45

V,1,3102

(stage directions). [Exit BUCKINGHAM]

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). O blood-besotted Neapolitan,
Outcast of Naples, England's bloody scourge!
The sons of York, thy betters in their birth,
Shall be their father's bail; and bane to those
That for my surety will refuse the boys!
[Enter EDWARD and RICHARD]
See where they come: I'll warrant they'll
make it good.


46

V,1,3114

(stage directions). [Kneels]

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). I thank thee, Clifford: say, what news with thee?
Nay, do not fright us with an angry look;
We are thy sovereign, Clifford, kneel again;
For thy mistaking so, we pardon thee.


47

V,1,3127

Queen Margaret. He is arrested, but will not obey;
His sons, he says, shall give their words for him.

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Will you not, sons?


48

V,1,3131

Lord Clifford. Why, what a brood of traitors have we here!

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Look in a glass, and call thy image so:
I am thy king, and thou a false-heart traitor.
Call hither to the stake my two brave bears,
That with the very shaking of their chains
They may astonish these fell-lurking curs:
Bid Salisbury and Warwick come to me.


49

V,1,3149

Lord Clifford. Hence, heap of wrath, foul indigested lump,
As crooked in thy manners as thy shape!

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Nay, we shall heat you thoroughly anon.


50

V,1,3183

Henry VI. Call Buckingham, and bid him arm himself.

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Call Buckingham, and all the friends thou hast,
I am resolved for death or dignity.


51

V,2,3218

Earl of Warwick. Clifford of Cumberland, 'tis Warwick calls:
And if thou dost not hide thee from the bear,
Now, when the angry trumpet sounds alarum
And dead men's cries do fill the empty air,
Clifford, I say, come forth and fight with me:
Proud northern lord, Clifford of Cumberland,
Warwick is hoarse with calling thee to arms.
[Enter YORK]
How now, my noble lord? what, all afoot?

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). The deadly-handed Clifford slew my steed,
But match to match I have encounter'd him
And made a prey for carrion kites and crows
Even of the bonny beast he loved so well.


52

V,2,3224

Earl of Warwick. Of one or both of us the time is come.

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Hold, Warwick, seek thee out some other chase,
For I myself must hunt this deer to death.


53

V,2,3231

Lord Clifford. What seest thou in me, York? why dost thou pause?

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). With thy brave bearing should I be in love,
But that thou art so fast mine enemy.


54

V,2,3235

Lord Clifford. Nor should thy prowess want praise and esteem,
But that 'tis shown ignobly and in treason.

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). So let it help me now against thy sword
As I in justice and true right express it.


55

V,2,3238

Lord Clifford. My soul and body on the action both!

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). A dreadful lay! Address thee instantly.


56

V,2,3242

(stage directions). [Dies]

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Thus war hath given thee peace, for thou art still.
Peace with his soul, heaven, if it be thy will!


57

V,3,3319

(stage directions). [Alarum. Retreat. Enter YORK, RICHARD, WARWICK,]
and Soldiers, with drum and colours]

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Of Salisbury, who can report of him,
That winter lion, who in rage forgets
Aged contusions and all brush of time,
And, like a gallant in the brow of youth,
Repairs him with occasion? This happy day
Is not itself, nor have we won one foot,
If Salisbury be lost.


58

V,3,3343

Earl of Salisbury. Now, by my sword, well hast thou fought to-day;
By the mass, so did we all. I thank you, Richard:
God knows how long it is I have to live;
And it hath pleased him that three times to-day
You have defended me from imminent death.
Well, lords, we have not got that which we have:
'Tis not enough our foes are this time fled,
Being opposites of such repairing nature.

Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). I know our safety is to follow them;
For, as I hear, the king is fled to London,
To call a present court of parliament.
Let us pursue him ere the writs go forth.
What says Lord Warwick? shall we after them?


Return to the "Henry VI, Part II" menu

Plays + Sonnets + Poems + Concordance + Character Search + Advanced Search + About OSS