Speeches (Lines) for Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester)
in "Henry VI, Part II"

Total: 58

---
# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,131

For Suffolk's duke, may he be suffocate,
That dims the honour of this warlike isle!...

2

I,1,218

[Aside] And so says York, for he hath greatest cause.

3

I,1,226

Anjou and Maine are given to the French;
Paris is lost; the state of Normandy...

4

I,3,497

If York have ill demean'd himself in France,
Then let him be denay'd the regentship.

5

I,3,564

I'll tell thee, Suffolk, why I am unmeet:
First, for I cannot flatter thee in pride;...

6

I,3,580

Doth any one accuse York for a traitor?

7

I,3,594

Base dunghill villain and mechanical,
I'll have thy head for this thy traitor's speech....

8

I,4,677

Lay hands upon these traitors and their trash.
Beldam, I think we watch'd you at an inch....

9

I,4,693

Lord Buckingham, methinks, you watch'd her well:
A pretty plot, well chosen to build upon!...

10

I,4,719

At your pleasure, my good lord. Who's within
there, ho!...

11

II,2,956

Now, my good Lords of Salisbury and Warwick,
Our simple supper ended, give me leave...

12

II,2,964

Then thus:
Edward the Third, my lords, had seven sons:...

13

II,2,985

Which now they hold by force and not by right;
For Richard, the first son's heir, being dead,...

14

II,2,989

The third son, Duke of Clarence, from whose line
I claimed the crown, had issue, Philippe, a daughter,...

15

II,2,999

His eldest sister, Anne,
My mother, being heir unto the crown...

16

II,2,1020

We thank you, lords. But I am not your king
Till I be crown'd and that my sword be stain'd...

17

II,2,1036

And, Nevil, this I do assure myself:
Richard shall live to make the Earl of Warwick...

18

II,3,1092

Lords, let him go. Please it your majesty,
This is the day appointed for the combat;...

19

II,3,1101

I never saw a fellow worse bested,
Or more afraid to fight, than is the appellant,...

20

II,3,1139

Dispatch: this knave's tongue begins to double.
Sound, trumpets, alarum to the combatants!

21

II,3,1144

Take away his weapon. Fellow, thank God, and the
good wine in thy master's way.

22

III,1,1337

And did he not, in his protectorship,
Levy great sums of money through the realm...

23

III,1,1366

[Aside] Cold news for me; for I had hope of France
As firmly as I hope for fertile England....

24

III,1,1384

'Tis thought, my lord, that you took bribes of France,
And, being protector, stayed the soldiers' pay;...

25

III,1,1401

In your protectorship you did devise
Strange tortures for offenders never heard of,...

26

III,1,1527

So that, by this, you would not have him die.

27

III,1,1529

'Tis York that hath more reason for his death.
But, my lord cardinal, and you, my Lord of Suffolk,...

28

III,1,1564

And I and now we three have spoke it,
It skills not greatly who impugns our doom.

29

III,1,1575

That Somerset be sent as regent thither:
'Tis meet that lucky ruler be employ'd;...

30

III,1,1581

No, not to lose it all, as thou hast done:
I rather would have lost my life betimes...

31

III,1,1592

What, worse than nought? nay, then, a shame take all!

32

III,1,1600

I will, my lord, so please his majesty.

33

III,1,1604

I am content: provide me soldiers, lords,
Whiles I take order for mine own affairs.

34

III,1,1612

My Lord of Suffolk, within fourteen days
At Bristol I expect my soldiers;...

35

III,1,1617

Now, York, or never, steel thy fearful thoughts,
And change misdoubt to resolution:...

36

V,1,2977

From Ireland thus comes York to claim his right,
And pluck the crown from feeble Henry's head:...

37

V,1,2992

Humphrey of Buckingham, I accept thy greeting.
Art thou a messenger, or come of pleasure?

38

V,1,3000

[Aside] Scarce can I speak, my choler is so great:
O, I could hew up rocks and fight with flint,...

39

V,1,3019

Upon thine honour, is he prisoner?

40

V,1,3021

Then, Buckingham, I do dismiss my powers.
Soldiers, I thank you all; disperse yourselves;...

41

V,1,3036

In all submission and humility
York doth present himself unto your highness.

42

V,1,3039

To heave the traitor Somerset from hence,
And fight against that monstrous rebel Cade,...

43

V,1,3070

How now! is Somerset at liberty?
Then, York, unloose thy long-imprison'd thoughts,...

44

V,1,3092

Wouldst have me kneel? first let me ask of these,
If they can brook I bow a knee to man....

45

V,1,3102

O blood-besotted Neapolitan,
Outcast of Naples, England's bloody scourge!...

46

V,1,3114

I thank thee, Clifford: say, what news with thee?
Nay, do not fright us with an angry look;...

47

V,1,3127

Will you not, sons?

48

V,1,3131

Look in a glass, and call thy image so:
I am thy king, and thou a false-heart traitor....

49

V,1,3149

Nay, we shall heat you thoroughly anon.

50

V,1,3183

Call Buckingham, and all the friends thou hast,
I am resolved for death or dignity.

51

V,2,3218

The deadly-handed Clifford slew my steed,
But match to match I have encounter'd him...

52

V,2,3224

Hold, Warwick, seek thee out some other chase,
For I myself must hunt this deer to death.

53

V,2,3231

With thy brave bearing should I be in love,
But that thou art so fast mine enemy.

54

V,2,3235

So let it help me now against thy sword
As I in justice and true right express it.

55

V,2,3238

A dreadful lay! Address thee instantly.

56

V,2,3242

Thus war hath given thee peace, for thou art still.
Peace with his soul, heaven, if it be thy will!

57

V,3,3319

Of Salisbury, who can report of him,
That winter lion, who in rage forgets...

58

V,3,3343

I know our safety is to follow them;
For, as I hear, the king is fled to London,...

Return to the "Henry VI, Part II" menu

Plays + Sonnets + Poems + Concordance + Character Search + Advanced Search + About OSS