Speeches (Lines) for Richard III (Duke of Gloucester)
in "Richard III"

Total: 301

---
# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,2

Now is the winter of our discontent
Made glorious summer by this sun of York;...

2

I,1,50

Upon what cause?

3

I,1,52

Alack, my lord, that fault is none of yours;
He should, for that, commit your godfathers:...

4

I,1,67

Why, this it is, when men are ruled by women:
'Tis not the king that sends you to the Tower:...

5

I,1,81

Humbly complaining to her deity
Got my lord chamberlain his liberty....

6

I,1,93

Even so; an't please your worship, Brakenbury,
You may partake of any thing we say:...

7

I,1,103

Naught to do with mistress Shore! I tell thee, fellow,
He that doth naught with her, excepting one,...

8

I,1,107

Her husband, knave: wouldst thou betray me?

9

I,1,111

We are the queen's abjects, and must obey.
Brother, farewell: I will unto the king;...

10

I,1,119

Well, your imprisonment shall not be long;
Meantime, have patience.

11

I,1,123

Go, tread the path that thou shalt ne'er return.
Simple, plain Clarence! I do love thee so,...

12

I,1,130

As much unto my good lord chamberlain!
Well are you welcome to the open air....

13

I,1,136

No doubt, no doubt; and so shall Clarence too;
For they that were your enemies are his,...

14

I,1,141

What news abroad?

15

I,1,145

Now, by Saint Paul, this news is bad indeed.
O, he hath kept an evil diet long,...

16

I,1,151

Go you before, and I will follow you.
[Exit HASTINGS]...

17

I,2,207

Stay, you that bear the corse, and set it down.

18

I,2,210

Villains, set down the corse; or, by Saint Paul,
I'll make a corse of him that disobeys.

19

I,2,213

Unmanner'd dog! stand thou, when I command:
Advance thy halbert higher than my breast,...

20

I,2,223

Sweet saint, for charity, be not so curst.

21

I,2,243

Lady, you know no rules of charity,
Which renders good for bad, blessings for curses.

22

I,2,247

But I know none, and therefore am no beast.

23

I,2,249

More wonderful, when angels are so angry.
Vouchsafe, divine perfection of a woman,...

24

I,2,256

Fairer than tongue can name thee, let me have
Some patient leisure to excuse myself.

25

I,2,260

By such despair, I should accuse myself.

26

I,2,264

Say that I slew them not?

27

I,2,267

I did not kill your husband.

28

I,2,269

Nay, he is dead; and slain by Edward's hand.

29

I,2,274

I was provoked by her slanderous tongue,
which laid their guilt upon my guiltless shoulders.

30

I,2,279

I grant ye.

31

I,2,283

The fitter for the King of heaven, that hath him.

32

I,2,285

Let him thank me, that holp to send him thither;
For he was fitter for that place than earth.

33

I,2,288

Yes, one place else, if you will hear me name it.

34

I,2,290

Your bed-chamber.

35

I,2,292

So will it, madam till I lie with you.

36

I,2,294

I know so. But, gentle Lady Anne,
To leave this keen encounter of our wits,...

37

I,2,301

Your beauty was the cause of that effect;
Your beauty: which did haunt me in my sleep...

38

I,2,307

These eyes could never endure sweet beauty's wreck;
You should not blemish it, if I stood by:...

39

I,2,312

Curse not thyself, fair creature thou art both.

40

I,2,314

It is a quarrel most unnatural,
To be revenged on him that loveth you.

41

I,2,318

He that bereft thee, lady, of thy husband,
Did it to help thee to a better husband.

42

I,2,321

He lives that loves thee better than he could.

43

I,2,323

Plantagenet.

44

I,2,325

The selfsame name, but one of better nature.

45

I,2,327

Here.
[She spitteth at him]...

46

I,2,331

Never came poison from so sweet a place.

47

I,2,334

Thine eyes, sweet lady, have infected mine.

48

I,2,336

I would they were, that I might die at once;
For now they kill me with a living death....

49

I,2,374

Then bid me kill myself, and I will do it.

50

I,2,376

Tush, that was in thy rage:
Speak it again, and, even with the word,...

51

I,2,382

'Tis figured in my tongue.

52

I,2,384

Then never man was true.

53

I,2,386

Say, then, my peace is made.

54

I,2,388

But shall I live in hope?

55

I,2,390

Vouchsafe to wear this ring.

56

I,2,392

Look, how this ring encompasseth finger.
Even so thy breast encloseth my poor heart;...

57

I,2,399

That it would please thee leave these sad designs
To him that hath more cause to be a mourner,...

58

I,2,411

Bid me farewell.

59

I,2,416

Sirs, take up the corse.

60

I,2,418

No, to White-Friars; there attend my coining.
[Exeunt all but GLOUCESTER]...

61

I,3,503

They do me wrong, and I will not endure it:
Who are they that complain unto the king,...

62

I,3,516

To thee, that hast nor honesty nor grace.
When have I injured thee? when done thee wrong?...

63

I,3,531

I cannot tell: the world is grown so bad,
That wrens make prey where eagles dare not perch:...

64

I,3,539

Meantime, God grants that we have need of you:
Your brother is imprison'd by your means,...

65

I,3,552

You may deny that you were not the cause
Of my Lord Hastings' late imprisonment.

66

I,3,555

She may, Lord Rivers! why, who knows not so?
She may do more, sir, than denying that:...

67

I,3,562

What, marry, may she! marry with a king,
A bachelor, a handsome stripling too:...

68

I,3,576

What! threat you me with telling of the king?
Tell him, and spare not: look, what I have said...

69

I,3,584

Ere you were queen, yea, or your husband king,
I was a pack-horse in his great affairs;...

70

I,3,590

In all which time you and your husband Grey
Were factious for the house of Lancaster;...

71

I,3,598

Poor Clarence did forsake his father, Warwick;
Yea, and forswore himself,—which Jesu pardon!—

72

I,3,601

To fight on Edward's party for the crown;
And for his meed, poor lord, he is mew'd up....

73

I,3,612

If I should be! I had rather be a pedlar:
Far be it from my heart, the thought of it!

74

I,3,628

Foul wrinkled witch, what makest thou in my sight?

75

I,3,631

Wert thou not banished on pain of death?

76

I,3,638

The curse my noble father laid on thee,
When thou didst crown his warlike brows with paper...

77

I,3,679

Have done thy charm, thou hateful wither'd hag!

78

I,3,698

Margaret.

79

I,3,700

Ha!

80

I,3,702

I cry thee mercy then, for I had thought
That thou hadst call'd me all these bitter names.

81

I,3,706

'Tis done by me, and ends in 'Margaret.'

82

I,3,728

Good counsel, marry: learn it, learn it, marquess.

83

I,3,730

Yea, and much more: but I was born so high,
Our aery buildeth in the cedar's top,...

84

I,3,762

What doth she say, my Lord of Buckingham?

85

I,3,774

I cannot blame her: by God's holy mother,
She hath had too much wrong; and I repent...

86

I,3,778

But you have all the vantage of her wrong.
I was too hot to do somebody good,...

87

I,3,786

So do I ever:
[Aside]...

88

I,3,796

I do the wrong, and first begin to brawl.
The secret mischiefs that I set abroach...

89

I,3,817

Well thought upon; I have it here about me.
[Gives the warrant]...

90

I,3,828

Your eyes drop millstones, when fools' eyes drop tears:
I like you, lads; about your business straight;...

91

II,1,1170

Good morrow to my sovereign king and queen:
And, princely peers, a happy time of day!

92

II,1,1176

A blessed labour, my most sovereign liege:
Amongst this princely heap, if any here,...

93

II,1,1201

Why, madam, have I offer'd love for this
To be so bouted in this royal presence?...

94

II,1,1212

But he, poor soul, by your first order died,
And that a winged Mercury did bear:...

95

II,1,1262

This is the fruit of rashness! Mark'd you not
How that the guilty kindred of the queen...

96

II,2,1374

Madam, have comfort: all of us have cause
To wail the dimming of our shining star;...

97

II,2,1382

[Aside] Amen; and make me die a good old man!
That is the butt-end of a mother's blessing:...

98

II,2,1405

I hope the king made peace with all of us
And the compact is firm and true in me.

99

II,2,1414

Then be it so; and go we to determine
Who they shall be that straight shall post to Ludlow....

100

II,2,1425

My other self, my counsel's consistory,
My oracle, my prophet! My dear cousin,...

101

III,1,1568

Welcome, dear cousin, my thoughts' sovereign
The weary way hath made you melancholy.

102

III,1,1573

Sweet prince, the untainted virtue of your years
Hath not yet dived into the world's deceit...

103

III,1,1583

My lord, the mayor of London comes to greet you.

104

III,1,1632

Where it seems best unto your royal self.
If I may counsel you, some day or two...

105

III,1,1648

[Aside] So wise so young, they say, do never
live long.

106

III,1,1651

I say, without characters, fame lives long.
[Aside]...

107

III,1,1665

[Aside] Short summers lightly have a forward spring.

108

III,1,1673

How fares our cousin, noble Lord of York?

109

III,1,1677

He hath, my lord.

110

III,1,1679

O, my fair cousin, I must not say so.

111

III,1,1681

He may command me as my sovereign;
But you have power in me as in a kinsman.

112

III,1,1684

My dagger, little cousin? with all my heart.

113

III,1,1688

A greater gift than that I'll give my cousin.

114

III,1,1690

A gentle cousin, were it light enough.

115

III,1,1693

It is too heavy for your grace to wear.

116

III,1,1695

What, would you have my weapon, little lord?

117

III,1,1697

How?

118

III,1,1709

My lord, will't please you pass along?
Myself and my good cousin Buckingham...

119

III,1,1716

Why, what should you fear?

120

III,1,1720

Nor none that live, I hope.

121

III,1,1729

No doubt, no doubt; O, 'tis a parlous boy;
Bold, quick, ingenious, forward, capable...

122

III,1,1756

Commend me to Lord William: tell him, Catesby,
His ancient knot of dangerous adversaries...

123

III,1,1763

Shall we hear from you, Catesby, ere we sleep?

124

III,1,1765

At Crosby Place, there shall you find us both.

125

III,1,1769

Chop off his head, man; somewhat we will do:
And, look, when I am king, claim thou of me...

126

III,1,1774

And look to have it yielded with all willingness.
Come, let us sup betimes, that afterwards...

127

III,4,1971

My noble lords and cousins all, good morrow.
I have been long a sleeper; but, I hope,...

128

III,4,1978

Than my Lord Hastings no man might be bolder;
His lordship knows me well, and loves me well.

129

III,4,1981

My lord of Ely!

130

III,4,1983

When I was last in Holborn,
I saw good strawberries in your garden there...

131

III,4,1988

Cousin of Buckingham, a word with you.
[Drawing him aside]...

132

III,4,2016

I pray you all, tell me what they deserve
That do conspire my death with devilish plots...

133

III,4,2024

Then be your eyes the witness of this ill:
See how I am bewitch'd; behold mine arm...

134

III,4,2031

If I thou protector of this damned strumpet—
Tellest thou me of 'ifs'? Thou art a traitor:...

135

III,5,2069

Come, cousin, canst thou quake, and change thy colour,
Murder thy breath in the middle of a word,...

136

III,5,2081

He is; and, see, he brings the mayor along.

137

III,5,2084

Look to the drawbridge there!

138

III,5,2086

Catesby, o'erlook the walls.

139

III,5,2088

Look back, defend thee, here are enemies.

140

III,5,2090

Be patient, they are friends, Ratcliff and Lovel.

141

III,5,2094

So dear I loved the man, that I must weep.
I took him for the plainest harmless creature...

142

III,5,2111

What, think You we are Turks or infidels?
Or that we would, against the form of law,...

143

III,5,2122

Yet had not we determined he should die,
Until your lordship came to see his death;...

144

III,5,2137

And to that end we wish'd your lord-ship here,
To avoid the carping censures of the world.

145

III,5,2143

Go, after, after, cousin Buckingham.
The mayor towards Guildhall hies him in all post:...

146

III,5,2169

If you thrive well, bring them to Baynard's Castle;
Where you shall find me well accompanied...

147

III,5,2175

Go, Lovel, with all speed to Doctor Shaw;
[To CATESBY]...

148

III,7,2202

How now, my lord, what say the citizens?

149

III,7,2205

Touch'd you the bastardy of Edward's children?

150

III,7,2224

Ah! and did they so?

151

III,7,2243

What tongueless blocks were they! would not they speak?

152

III,7,2245

Will not the mayor then and his brethren come?

153

III,7,2253

I go; and if you plead as well for them
As I can say nay to thee for myself,...

154

III,7,2315

My lord, there needs no such apology:
I rather do beseech you pardon me,...

155

III,7,2322

I do suspect I have done some offence
That seems disgracious in the city's eyes,...

156

III,7,2327

Else wherefore breathe I in a Christian land?

157

III,7,2352

I know not whether to depart in silence,
Or bitterly to speak in your reproof....

158

III,7,2415

Alas, why would you heap these cares on me?
I am unfit for state and majesty;...

159

III,7,2431

O, do not swear, my lord of Buckingham.

160

III,7,2435

Would you enforce me to a world of care?
Well, call them again. I am not made of stone,...

161

III,7,2451

In saying so, you shall but say the truth.

162

III,7,2456

Even when you please, since you will have it so.

163

III,7,2459

Come, let us to our holy task again.
Farewell, good cousin; farewell, gentle friends.

164

IV,2,2581

Stand all apart Cousin of Buckingham!

165

IV,2,2583

Give me thy hand.
[Here he ascendeth his throne]...

166

IV,2,2590

O Buckingham, now do I play the touch,
To try if thou be current gold indeed...

167

IV,2,2594

Why, Buckingham, I say, I would be king,

168

IV,2,2596

Ha! am I king? 'tis so: but Edward lives.

169

IV,2,2598

O bitter consequence,
That Edward still should live! 'True, noble prince!'...

170

IV,2,2605

Tut, tut, thou art all ice, thy kindness freezeth:
Say, have I thy consent that they shall die?

171

IV,2,2613

I will converse with iron-witted fools
And unrespective boys: none are for me...

172

IV,2,2619

Know'st thou not any whom corrupting gold
Would tempt unto a close exploit of death?

173

IV,2,2625

What is his name?

174

IV,2,2627

I partly know the man: go, call him hither.
[Exit Page]...

175

IV,2,2639

Catesby!

176

IV,2,2641

Rumour it abroad
That Anne, my wife, is sick and like to die:...

177

IV,2,2661

Art thou, indeed?

178

IV,2,2663

Darest thou resolve to kill a friend of mine?

179

IV,2,2666

Why, there thou hast it: two deep enemies,
Foes to my rest and my sweet sleep's disturbers...

180

IV,2,2672

Thou sing'st sweet music. Hark, come hither, Tyrrel
Go, by this token: rise, and lend thine ear:...

181

IV,2,2678

Shall we hear from thee, Tyrrel, ere we sleep?

182

IV,2,2683

Well, let that pass. Dorset is fled to Richmond.

183

IV,2,2685

Stanley, he is your wife's son well, look to it.

184

IV,2,2690

Stanley, look to your wife; if she convey
Letters to Richmond, you shall answer it.

185

IV,2,2693

As I remember, Henry the Sixth
Did prophesy that Richmond should be king,...

186

IV,2,2698

How chance the prophet could not at that time
Have told me, I being by, that I should kill him?

187

IV,2,2701

Richmond! When last I was at Exeter,
The mayor in courtesy show'd me the castle,...

188

IV,2,2707

Ay, what's o'clock?

189

IV,2,2710

Well, but what's o'clock?

190

IV,2,2712

Well, let it strike.

191

IV,2,2714

Because that, like a Jack, thou keep'st the stroke
Betwixt thy begging and my meditation....

192

IV,2,2718

Tut, tut,
Thou troublest me; am not in the vein.

193

IV,3,2752

Kind Tyrrel, am I happy in thy news?

194

IV,3,2756

But didst thou see them dead?

195

IV,3,2758

And buried, gentle Tyrrel?

196

IV,3,2761

Come to me, Tyrrel, soon at after supper,
And thou shalt tell the process of their death....

197

IV,3,2777

Good news or bad, that thou comest in so bluntly?

198

IV,3,2781

Ely with Richmond troubles me more near
Than Buckingham and his rash-levied army....

199

IV,4,2933

Who intercepts my expedition?

200

IV,4,2945

A flourish, trumpets! strike alarum, drums!
Let not the heavens hear these tell-tale women...

201

IV,4,2953

Ay, I thank God, my father, and yourself.

202

IV,4,2955

Madam, I have a touch of your condition,
Which cannot brook the accent of reproof.

203

IV,4,2958

Do then: but I'll not hear.

204

IV,4,2960

And brief, good mother; for I am in haste.

205

IV,4,2963

And came I not at last to comfort you?

206

IV,4,2975

Faith, none, but Humphrey Hour, that call'd
your grace...

207

IV,4,2982

You speak too bitterly.

208

IV,4,2985

So.

209

IV,4,3002

Stay, madam; I must speak a word with you.

210

IV,4,3007

You have a daughter call'd Elizabeth,
Virtuous and fair, royal and gracious.

211

IV,4,3015

Wrong not her birth, she is of royal blood.

212

IV,4,3017

Her life is only safest in her birth.

213

IV,4,3019

Lo, at their births good stars were opposite.

214

IV,4,3021

All unavoided is the doom of destiny.

215

IV,4,3025

You speak as if that I had slain my cousins.

216

IV,4,3039

Madam, so thrive I in my enterprise
And dangerous success of bloody wars,...

217

IV,4,3045

The advancement of your children, gentle lady.

218

IV,4,3047

No, to the dignity and height of honour
The high imperial type of this earth's glory.

219

IV,4,3052

Even all I have; yea, and myself and all,
Will I withal endow a child of thine;...

220

IV,4,3059

Then know, that from my soul I love thy daughter.

221

IV,4,3061

What do you think?

222

IV,4,3065

Be not so hasty to confound my meaning:
I mean, that with my soul I love thy daughter,...

223

IV,4,3069

Even he that makes her queen who should be else?

224

IV,4,3071

I, even I: what think you of it, madam?

225

IV,4,3073

That would I learn of you,
As one that are best acquainted with her humour.

226

IV,4,3076

Madam, with all my heart.

227

IV,4,3090

Come, come, you mock me; this is not the way
To win our daughter.

228

IV,4,3095

Say that I did all this for love of her.

229

IV,4,3098

Look, what is done cannot be now amended:
Men shall deal unadvisedly sometimes,...

230

IV,4,3150

Infer fair England's peace by this alliance.

231

IV,4,3152

Say that the king, which may command, entreats.

232

IV,4,3154

Say, she shall be a high and mighty queen.

233

IV,4,3156

Say, I will love her everlastingly.

234

IV,4,3158

Sweetly in force unto her fair life's end.

235

IV,4,3160

So long as heaven and nature lengthens it.

236

IV,4,3162

Say, I, her sovereign, am her subject love.

237

IV,4,3164

Be eloquent in my behalf to her.

238

IV,4,3166

Then in plain terms tell her my loving tale.

239

IV,4,3168

Your reasons are too shallow and too quick.

240

IV,4,3171

Harp not on that string, madam; that is past.

241

IV,4,3173

Now, by my George, my garter, and my crown,—

242

IV,4,3175

I swear—

243

IV,4,3182

Now, by the world—

244

IV,4,3184

My father's death—

245

IV,4,3186

Then, by myself—

246

IV,4,3188

Why then, by God—

247

IV,4,3200

The time to come.

248

IV,4,3211

As I intend to prosper and repent,
So thrive I in my dangerous attempt...

249

IV,4,3233

Ay, if the devil tempt thee to do good.

250

IV,4,3235

Ay, if yourself's remembrance wrong yourself.

251

IV,4,3237

But in your daughter's womb I bury them:
Where in that nest of spicery they shall breed...

252

IV,4,3241

And be a happy mother by the deed.

253

IV,4,3244

Bear her my true love's kiss; and so, farewell.
[Exit QUEEN ELIZABETH]...

254

IV,4,3256

Some light-foot friend post to the Duke of Norfolk:
Ratcliff, thyself, or Catesby; where is he?

255

IV,4,3259

Fly to the duke:
[To RATCLIFF]...

256

IV,4,3268

O, true, good Catesby: bid him levy straight
The greatest strength and power he can make,...

257

IV,4,3275

Why, what wouldst thou do there before I go?

258

IV,4,3277

My mind is changed, sir, my mind is changed.
[Enter STANLEY]...

259

IV,4,3282

Hoyday, a riddle! neither good nor bad!
Why dost thou run so many mile about,...

260

IV,4,3287

There let him sink, and be the seas on him!
White-liver'd runagate, what doth he there?

261

IV,4,3290

Well, sir, as you guess, as you guess?

262

IV,4,3293

Is the chair empty? is the sword unsway'd?
Is the king dead? the empire unpossess'd?...

263

IV,4,3299

Unless for that he comes to be your liege,
You cannot guess wherefore the Welshman comes....

264

IV,4,3303

Where is thy power, then, to beat him back?
Where are thy tenants and thy followers?...

265

IV,4,3308

Cold friends to Richard: what do they in the north,
When they should serve their sovereign in the west?

266

IV,4,3314

Ay, ay. thou wouldst be gone to join with Richmond:
I will not trust you, sir.

267

IV,4,3319

Well,
Go muster men; but, hear you, leave behind...

268

IV,4,3337

Out on you, owls! nothing but songs of death?
[He striketh him]...

269

IV,4,3345

I cry thee mercy:
There is my purse to cure that blow of thine....

270

IV,4,3361

March on, march on, since we are up in arms;
If not to fight with foreign enemies,...

271

IV,4,3369

Away towards Salisbury! while we reason here,
A royal battle might be won and lost...

272

V,3,3456

Here pitch our tents, even here in Bosworth field.
My Lord of Surrey, why look you so sad?

273

V,3,3459

My Lord of Norfolk,—

274

V,3,3461

Norfolk, we must have knocks; ha! must we not?

275

V,3,3463

Up with my tent there! here will I lie tonight;
But where to-morrow? Well, all's one for that....

276

V,3,3467

Why, our battalion trebles that account:
Besides, the king's name is a tower of strength,...

277

V,3,3510

What is't o'clock?

278

V,3,3513

I will not sup to-night.
Give me some ink and paper....

279

V,3,3518

Good Norfolk, hie thee to thy charge;
Use careful watch, choose trusty sentinels.

280

V,3,3521

Stir with the lark to-morrow, gentle Norfolk.

281

V,3,3524

Catesby!

282

V,3,3526

Send out a pursuivant at arms
To Stanley's regiment; bid him bring his power...

283

V,3,3536

Saw'st thou the melancholy Lord Northumberland?

284

V,3,3540

So, I am satisfied. Give me a bowl of wine:
I have not that alacrity of spirit,...

285

V,3,3545

Bid my guard watch; leave me.
Ratcliff, about the mid of night come to my tent...

286

V,3,3679

Give me another horse: bind up my wounds.
Have mercy, Jesu!—Soft! I did but dream....

287

V,3,3711

'Zounds! who is there?

288

V,3,3715

O Ratcliff, I have dream'd a fearful dream!
What thinkest thou, will our friends prove all true?

289

V,3,3718

O Ratcliff, I fear, I fear,—

290

V,3,3720

By the apostle Paul, shadows to-night
Have struck more terror to the soul of Richard...

291

V,3,3781

What said Northumberland as touching Richmond?

292

V,3,3783

He said the truth: and what said Surrey then?

293

V,3,3785

He was in the right; and so indeed it is.
[Clock striketh]...

294

V,3,3790

Then he disdains to shine; for by the book
He should have braved the east an hour ago...

295

V,3,3794

The sun will not be seen to-day;
The sky doth frown and lour upon our army....

296

V,3,3802

Come, bustle, bustle; caparison my horse.
Call up Lord Stanley, bid him bring his power:...

297

V,3,3818

[Reads]
'Jockey of Norfolk, be not too bold,...

298

V,3,3863

Off with his son George's head!

299

V,3,3866

A thousand hearts are great within my bosom:
Advance our standards, set upon our foes...

300

V,4,3881

A horse! a horse! my kingdom for a horse!

301

V,4,3883

Slave, I have set my life upon a cast,
And I will stand the hazard of the die:...

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