Speeches (Lines) for Reignier
in "Henry VI, Part I"

Total: 24

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,203

Let's raise the siege: why live we idly here?
Talbot is taken, whom we wont to fear:
Remaineth none but mad-brain'd Salisbury;
And he may well in fretting spend his gall,
Nor men nor money hath he to make war.

2

I,2,218

Salisbury is a desperate homicide;
He fighteth as one weary of his life.
The other lords, like lions wanting food,
Do rush upon us as their hungry prey.

3

I,2,234

I think, by some odd gimmors or device
Their arms are set like clocks, stiff to strike on;
Else ne'er could they hold out so as they do.
By my consent, we'll even let them alone.

4

I,2,261

Fair maid, is't thou wilt do these wondrous feats?

5

I,2,268

She takes upon her bravely at first dash.

6

I,2,317

My lord, methinks, is very long in talk.

7

I,2,320

Shall we disturb him, since he keeps no mean?

8

I,2,323

My lord, where are you? what devise you on?
Shall we give over Orleans, or no?

9

I,2,346

Woman, do what thou canst to save our honours;
Drive them from Orleans and be immortalized.

10

I,6,639

Why ring not out the bells aloud throughout the town?
Dauphin, command the citizens make bonfires
And feast and banquet in the open streets,
To celebrate the joy that God hath given us.

11

II,1,712

'Twas time, I trow, to wake and leave our beds,
Hearing alarums at our chamber-doors.

12

II,1,718

If not of hell, the heavens, sure, favour him.

13

II,1,739

And so was mine, my lord.

14

III,2,1466

By thrusting out a torch from yonder tower;
Which, once discern'd, shows that her meaning is,
No way to that, for weakness, which she enter'd.
[Enter JOAN LA PUCELLE on the top, thrusting out a]
torch burning]

15

III,2,1479

Defer no time, delays have dangerous ends;
Enter, and cry 'The Dauphin!' presently,
And then do execution on the watch.

16

V,3,2595

To whom?

17

V,3,2597

Suffolk, what remedy?
I am a soldier, and unapt to weep,
Or to exclaim on fortune's fickleness.

18

V,3,2606

Speaks Suffolk as he thinks?

19

V,3,2609

Upon thy princely warrant, I descend
To give thee answer of thy just demand.

20

V,3,2614

Welcome, brave earl, into our territories:
Command in Anjou what your honour pleases.

21

V,3,2619

Since thou dost deign to woo her little worth
To be the princely bride of such a lord;
Upon condition I may quietly
Enjoy mine own, the country Maine and Anjou,
Free from oppression or the stroke of war,
My daughter shall be Henry's, if he please.

22

V,3,2628

And I again, in Henry's royal name,
As deputy unto that gracious king,
Give thee her hand, for sign of plighted faith.

23

V,3,2640

I do embrace thee, as I would embrace
The Christian prince, King Henry, were he here.

24

V,4,2830

My lord, you do not well in obstinacy
To cavil in the course of this contract:
If once it be neglected, ten to one
We shall not find like opportunity.

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