Speeches (Lines) for Queen Elizabeth
in "Richard III"

Total: 98

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,3,465

If he were dead, what would betide of me?

2

I,3,467

The loss of such a lord includes all harm.

3

I,3,470

Oh, he is young and his minority
Is put unto the trust of Richard Gloucester,...

4

I,3,474

It is determined, not concluded yet:
But so it must be, if the king miscarry.

5

I,3,480

The Countess Richmond, good my Lord of Derby.
To your good prayers will scarcely say amen....

6

I,3,493

What likelihood of his amendment, lords?

7

I,3,495

God grant him health! Did you confer with him?

8

I,3,500

Would all were well! but that will never be
I fear our happiness is at the highest.

9

I,3,523

Brother of Gloucester, you mistake the matter.
The king, of his own royal disposition,...

10

I,3,535

Come, come, we know your meaning, brother
Gloucester;...

11

I,3,545

By Him that raised me to this careful height
From that contented hap which I enjoy'd,...

12

I,3,565

My Lord of Gloucester, I have too long borne
Your blunt upbraidings and your bitter scoffs:...

13

I,3,614

As little joy, my lord, as you suppose
You should enjoy, were you this country's king,...

14

I,3,646

So just is God, to right the innocent.

15

I,3,707

Thus have you breathed your curse against yourself.

16

I,3,777

I never did her any, to my knowledge.

17

I,3,793

Catesby, we come. Lords, will you go with us?

18

II,1,1143

Here, Hastings; I will never more remember
Our former hatred, so thrive I and mine!

19

II,1,1197

A holy day shall this be kept hereafter:
I would to God all strifes were well compounded....

20

II,1,1207

All seeing heaven, what a world is this!

21

II,2,1306

Oh, who shall hinder me to wail and weep,
To chide my fortune, and torment myself?...

22

II,2,1311

To make an act of tragic violence:
Edward, my lord, your son, our king, is dead....

23

II,2,1338

Give me no help in lamentation;
I am not barren to bring forth complaints...

24

II,2,1346

What stay had I but Edward? and he's gone.

25

II,2,1349

Was never widow had so dear a loss!

26

II,2,1418

[with the Duchess of York] With all our harts.

27

II,4,1489

But I hear, no; they say my son of York
Hath almost overta'en him in his growth.

28

II,4,1519

A parlous boy: go to, you are too shrewd.

29

II,4,1521

Pitchers have ears.

30

II,4,1525

How fares the prince?

31

II,4,1533

For what offence?

32

II,4,1537

Ay me, I see the downfall of our house!
The tiger now hath seized the gentle hind;...

33

II,4,1554

Come, come, my boy; we will to sanctuary.
Madam, farewell.

34

II,4,1557

You have no cause.

35

IV,1,2473

As much to you, good sister! Whither away?

36

IV,1,2477

Kind sister, thanks: we'll enter all together.
[Enter BRAKENBURY]...

37

IV,1,2485

The king! why, who's that?

38

IV,1,2487

The Lord protect him from that kingly title!
Hath he set bounds betwixt their love and me?...

39

IV,1,2504

O, cut my lace in sunder, that my pent heart
May have some scope to beat, or else I swoon...

40

IV,1,2509

O Dorset, speak not to me, get thee hence!
Death and destruction dog thee at the heels;...

41

IV,1,2534

Go, go, poor soul, I envy not thy glory
To feed my humour, wish thyself no harm.

42

IV,1,2558

Poor heart, adieu! I pity thy complaining.

43

IV,1,2560

Farewell, thou woful welcomer of glory!

44

IV,1,2571

Stay, yet look back with me unto the Tower.
Pity, you ancient stones, those tender babes...

45

IV,4,2801

Ah, my young princes! ah, my tender babes!
My unblown flowers, new-appearing sweets!...

46

IV,4,2814

Wilt thou, O God, fly from such gentle lambs,
And throw them in the entrails of the wolf?...

47

IV,4,2824

O, that thou wouldst as well afford a grave
As thou canst yield a melancholy seat!...

48

IV,4,2874

O, thou didst prophesy the time would come
That I should wish for thee to help me curse...

49

IV,4,2911

O thou well skill'd in curses, stay awhile,
And teach me how to curse mine enemies!

50

IV,4,2919

My words are dull; O, quicken them with thine!

51

IV,4,2923

Windy attorneys to their client woes,
Airy succeeders of intestate joys,...

52

IV,4,2937

Hidest thou that forehead with a golden crown,
Where should be graven, if that right were right,...

53

IV,4,2944

Where is kind Hastings, Rivers, Vaughan, Grey?

54

IV,4,3000

Though far more cause, yet much less spirit to curse
Abides in me; I say amen to all.

55

IV,4,3003

I have no more sons of the royal blood
For thee to murder: for my daughters, Richard,...

56

IV,4,3009

And must she die for this? O, let her live,
And I'll corrupt her manners, stain her beauty;...

57

IV,4,3016

To save her life, I'll say she is not so.

58

IV,4,3018

And only in that safety died her brothers.

59

IV,4,3020

No, to their lives bad friends were contrary.

60

IV,4,3022

True, when avoided grace makes destiny:
My babes were destined to a fairer death,...

61

IV,4,3026

Cousins, indeed; and by their uncle cozen'd
Of comfort, kingdom, kindred, freedom, life....

62

IV,4,3043

What good is cover'd with the face of heaven,
To be discover'd, that can do me good?

63

IV,4,3046

Up to some scaffold, there to lose their heads?

64

IV,4,3049

Flatter my sorrows with report of it;
Tell me what state, what dignity, what honour,...

65

IV,4,3057

Be brief, lest that be process of thy kindness
Last longer telling than thy kindness' date.

66

IV,4,3060

My daughter's mother thinks it with her soul.

67

IV,4,3062

That thou dost love my daughter from thy soul:
So from thy soul's love didst thou love her brothers;...

68

IV,4,3068

Say then, who dost thou mean shall be her king?

69

IV,4,3070

What, thou?

70

IV,4,3072

How canst thou woo her?

71

IV,4,3075

And wilt thou learn of me?

72

IV,4,3077

Send to her, by the man that slew her brothers,
A pair of bleeding-hearts; thereon engrave...

73

IV,4,3092

There is no other way
Unless thou couldst put on some other shape,...

74

IV,4,3096

Nay, then indeed she cannot choose but hate thee,
Having bought love with such a bloody spoil.

75

IV,4,3144

What were I best to say? her father's brother
Would be her lord? or shall I say, her uncle?...

76

IV,4,3151

Which she shall purchase with still lasting war.

77

IV,4,3153

That at her hands which the king's King forbids.

78

IV,4,3155

To wail the tide, as her mother doth.

79

IV,4,3157

But how long shall that title 'ever' last?

80

IV,4,3159

But how long fairly shall her sweet lie last?

81

IV,4,3161

So long as hell and Richard likes of it.

82

IV,4,3163

But she, your subject, loathes such sovereignty.

83

IV,4,3165

An honest tale speeds best being plainly told.

84

IV,4,3167

Plain and not honest is too harsh a style.

85

IV,4,3169

O no, my reasons are too deep and dead;
Too deep and dead, poor infants, in their grave.

86

IV,4,3172

Harp on it still shall I till heart-strings break.

87

IV,4,3174

Profaned, dishonour'd, and the third usurp'd.

88

IV,4,3176

By nothing; for this is no oath:
The George, profaned, hath lost his holy honour;...

89

IV,4,3183

'Tis full of thy foul wrongs.

90

IV,4,3185

Thy life hath that dishonour'd.

91

IV,4,3187

Thyself thyself misusest.

92

IV,4,3189

God's wrong is most of all.
If thou hadst fear'd to break an oath by Him,...

93

IV,4,3201

That thou hast wronged in the time o'erpast;
For I myself have many tears to wash...

94

IV,4,3232

Shall I be tempted of the devil thus?

95

IV,4,3234

Shall I forget myself to be myself?

96

IV,4,3236

But thou didst kill my children.

97

IV,4,3240

Shall I go win my daughter to thy will?

98

IV,4,3242

I go. Write to me very shortly.
And you shall understand from me her mind.

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