Speeches (Lines) for Queen Elizabeth
in "Henry VI, Part III"

Total: 31

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

III,2,1489

King Edward IV (Plantagenet). Widow, we will consider of your suit;
And come some other time to know our mind.

Queen Elizabeth. Right gracious lord, I cannot brook delay:
May it please your highness to resolve me now;
And what your pleasure is, shall satisfy me.


2

III,2,1505

Richard III (Duke of Gloucester). [Aside to CLARENCE] Nay, whip me then: he'll rather
give her two.

Queen Elizabeth. Three, my most gracious lord.


3

III,2,1509

King Edward IV (Plantagenet). 'Twere pity they should lose their father's lands.

Queen Elizabeth. Be pitiful, dread lord, and grant it then.


4

III,2,1516

King Edward IV (Plantagenet). Now tell me, madam, do you love your children?

Queen Elizabeth. Ay, full as dearly as I love myself.


5

III,2,1518

King Edward IV (Plantagenet). And would you not do much to do them good?

Queen Elizabeth. To do them good, I would sustain some harm.


6

III,2,1520

King Edward IV (Plantagenet). Then get your husband's lands, to do them good.

Queen Elizabeth. Therefore I came unto your majesty.


7

III,2,1522

King Edward IV (Plantagenet). I'll tell you how these lands are to be got.

Queen Elizabeth. So shall you bind me to your highness' service.


8

III,2,1524

King Edward IV (Plantagenet). What service wilt thou do me, if I give them?

Queen Elizabeth. What you command, that rests in me to do.


9

III,2,1526

King Edward IV (Plantagenet). But you will take exceptions to my boon.

Queen Elizabeth. No, gracious lord, except I cannot do it.


10

III,2,1528

King Edward IV (Plantagenet). Ay, but thou canst do what I mean to ask.

Queen Elizabeth. Why, then I will do what your grace commands.


11

III,2,1533

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). [Aside to GLOUCESTER] As red as fire! nay, then
her wax must melt.

Queen Elizabeth. Why stops my lord, shall I not hear my task?


12

III,2,1535

King Edward IV (Plantagenet). An easy task; 'tis but to love a king.

Queen Elizabeth. That's soon perform'd, because I am a subject.


13

III,2,1537

King Edward IV (Plantagenet). Why, then, thy husband's lands I freely give thee.

Queen Elizabeth. I take my leave with many thousand thanks.


14

III,2,1541

King Edward IV (Plantagenet). But stay thee, 'tis the fruits of love I mean.

Queen Elizabeth. The fruits of love I mean, my loving liege.


15

III,2,1544

King Edward IV (Plantagenet). Ay, but, I fear me, in another sense.
What love, think'st thou, I sue so much to get?

Queen Elizabeth. My love till death, my humble thanks, my prayers;
That love which virtue begs and virtue grants.


16

III,2,1547

King Edward IV (Plantagenet). No, by my troth, I did not mean such love.

Queen Elizabeth. Why, then you mean not as I thought you did.


17

III,2,1549

King Edward IV (Plantagenet). But now you partly may perceive my mind.

Queen Elizabeth. My mind will never grant what I perceive
Your highness aims at, if I aim aright.


18

III,2,1552

King Edward IV (Plantagenet). To tell thee plain, I aim to lie with thee.

Queen Elizabeth. To tell you plain, I had rather lie in prison.


19

III,2,1554

King Edward IV (Plantagenet). Why, then thou shalt not have thy husband's lands.

Queen Elizabeth. Why, then mine honesty shall be my dower;
For by that loss I will not purchase them.


20

III,2,1557

King Edward IV (Plantagenet). Therein thou wrong'st thy children mightily.

Queen Elizabeth. Herein your highness wrongs both them and me.
But, mighty lord, this merry inclination
Accords not with the sadness of my suit:
Please you dismiss me either with 'ay' or 'no.'


21

III,2,1563

King Edward IV (Plantagenet). Ay, if thou wilt say 'ay' to my request;
No if thou dost say 'no' to my demand.

Queen Elizabeth. Then, no, my lord. My suit is at an end.


22

III,2,1574

King Edward IV (Plantagenet). [Aside] Her looks do argue her replete with modesty;
Her words do show her wit incomparable;
All her perfections challenge sovereignty:
One way or other, she is for a king;
And she shall be my love, or else my queen.—
Say that King Edward take thee for his queen?

Queen Elizabeth. 'Tis better said than done, my gracious lord:
I am a subject fit to jest withal,
But far unfit to be a sovereign.


23

III,2,1580

King Edward IV (Plantagenet). Sweet widow, by my state I swear to thee
I speak no more than what my soul intends;
And that is, to enjoy thee for my love.

Queen Elizabeth. And that is more than I will yield unto:
I know I am too mean to be your queen,
And yet too good to be your concubine.


24

III,2,1584

King Edward IV (Plantagenet). You cavil, widow: I did mean, my queen.

Queen Elizabeth. 'Twill grieve your grace my sons should call you father.


25

IV,1,2042

King Edward IV (Plantagenet). Leave me, or tarry, Edward will be king,
And not be tied unto his brother's will.

Queen Elizabeth. My lords, before it pleased his majesty
To raise my state to title of a queen,
Do me but right, and you must all confess
That I was not ignoble of descent;
And meaner than myself have had like fortune.
But as this title honours me and mine,
So your dislike, to whom I would be pleasing,
Doth cloud my joys with danger and with sorrow.


26

IV,4,2244

Lord (Earl) Rivers. Madam, what makes you in this sudden change?

Queen Elizabeth. Why brother Rivers, are you yet to learn
What late misfortune is befall'n King Edward?


27

IV,4,2247

Lord (Earl) Rivers. What! loss of some pitch'd battle against Warwick?

Queen Elizabeth. No, but the loss of his own royal person.


28

IV,4,2249

Lord (Earl) Rivers. Then is my sovereign slain?

Queen Elizabeth. Ay, almost slain, for he is taken prisoner,
Either betray'd by falsehood of his guard
Or by his foe surprised at unawares:
And, as I further have to understand,
Is new committed to the Bishop of York,
Fell Warwick's brother and by that our foe.


29

IV,4,2258

Lord (Earl) Rivers. These news I must confess are full of grief;
Yet, gracious madam, bear it as you may:
Warwick may lose, that now hath won the day.

Queen Elizabeth. Till then fair hope must hinder life's decay.
And I the rather wean me from despair
For love of Edward's offspring in my womb:
This is it that makes me bridle passion
And bear with mildness my misfortune's cross;
Ay, ay, for this I draw in many a tear
And stop the rising of blood-sucking sighs,
Lest with my sighs or tears I blast or drown
King Edward's fruit, true heir to the English crown.


30

IV,4,2268

Lord (Earl) Rivers. But, madam, where is Warwick then become?

Queen Elizabeth. I am inform'd that he comes towards London,
To set the crown once more on Henry's head:
Guess thou the rest; King Edward's friends must down,
But, to prevent the tyrant's violence,—
For trust not him that hath once broken faith,—
I'll hence forthwith unto the sanctuary,
To save at least the heir of Edward's right:
There shall I rest secure from force and fraud.
Come, therefore, let us fly while we may fly:
If Warwick take us we are sure to die.


31

V,7,3125

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). The duty that I owe unto your majesty
I seal upon the lips of this sweet babe.

Queen Elizabeth. Thanks, noble Clarence; worthy brother, thanks.


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