Speeches (Lines) for Queen Elizabeth
in "Henry VI, Part III"

Total: 31

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

III,2,1489

Right gracious lord, I cannot brook delay:
May it please your highness to resolve me now;...

2

III,2,1505

Three, my most gracious lord.

3

III,2,1509

Be pitiful, dread lord, and grant it then.

4

III,2,1516

Ay, full as dearly as I love myself.

5

III,2,1518

To do them good, I would sustain some harm.

6

III,2,1520

Therefore I came unto your majesty.

7

III,2,1522

So shall you bind me to your highness' service.

8

III,2,1524

What you command, that rests in me to do.

9

III,2,1526

No, gracious lord, except I cannot do it.

10

III,2,1528

Why, then I will do what your grace commands.

11

III,2,1533

Why stops my lord, shall I not hear my task?

12

III,2,1535

That's soon perform'd, because I am a subject.

13

III,2,1537

I take my leave with many thousand thanks.

14

III,2,1541

The fruits of love I mean, my loving liege.

15

III,2,1544

My love till death, my humble thanks, my prayers;
That love which virtue begs and virtue grants.

16

III,2,1547

Why, then you mean not as I thought you did.

17

III,2,1549

My mind will never grant what I perceive
Your highness aims at, if I aim aright.

18

III,2,1552

To tell you plain, I had rather lie in prison.

19

III,2,1554

Why, then mine honesty shall be my dower;
For by that loss I will not purchase them.

20

III,2,1557

Herein your highness wrongs both them and me.
But, mighty lord, this merry inclination...

21

III,2,1563

Then, no, my lord. My suit is at an end.

22

III,2,1574

'Tis better said than done, my gracious lord:
I am a subject fit to jest withal,...

23

III,2,1580

And that is more than I will yield unto:
I know I am too mean to be your queen,...

24

III,2,1584

'Twill grieve your grace my sons should call you father.

25

IV,1,2042

My lords, before it pleased his majesty
To raise my state to title of a queen,...

26

IV,4,2244

Why brother Rivers, are you yet to learn
What late misfortune is befall'n King Edward?

27

IV,4,2247

No, but the loss of his own royal person.

28

IV,4,2249

Ay, almost slain, for he is taken prisoner,
Either betray'd by falsehood of his guard...

29

IV,4,2258

Till then fair hope must hinder life's decay.
And I the rather wean me from despair...

30

IV,4,2268

I am inform'd that he comes towards London,
To set the crown once more on Henry's head:...

31

V,7,3125

Thanks, noble Clarence; worthy brother, thanks.

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