Speeches (Lines) for Queen Elinor
in "King John"

Total: 22

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,7

Chatillon. Thus, after greeting, speaks the King of France
In my behavior to the majesty,
The borrow'd majesty, of England here.

Queen Elinor. A strange beginning: 'borrow'd majesty!'


2

I,1,34

(stage directions). [Exeunt CHATILLON and PEMBROKE]

Queen Elinor. What now, my son! have I not ever said
How that ambitious Constance would not cease
Till she had kindled France and all the world,
Upon the right and party of her son?
This might have been prevented and made whole
With very easy arguments of love,
Which now the manage of two kingdoms must
With fearful bloody issue arbitrate.


3

I,1,43

King John. Our strong possession and our right for us.

Queen Elinor. Your strong possession much more than your right,
Or else it must go wrong with you and me:
So much my conscience whispers in your ear,
Which none but heaven and you and I shall hear.


4

I,1,70

Philip the Bastard. Most certain of one mother, mighty king;
That is well known; and, as I think, one father:
But for the certain knowledge of that truth
I put you o'er to heaven and to my mother:
Of that I doubt, as all men's children may.

Queen Elinor. Out on thee, rude man! thou dost shame thy mother
And wound her honour with this diffidence.


5

I,1,91

King John. Why, what a madcap hath heaven lent us here!

Queen Elinor. He hath a trick of Coeur-de-lion's face;
The accent of his tongue affecteth him.
Do you not read some tokens of my son
In the large composition of this man?


6

I,1,140

Philip the Bastard. Of no more force to dispossess me, sir,
Than was his will to get me, as I think.

Queen Elinor. Whether hadst thou rather be a Faulconbridge
And like thy brother, to enjoy thy land,
Or the reputed son of Coeur-de-lion,
Lord of thy presence and no land beside?


7

I,1,154

Philip the Bastard. Madam, an if my brother had my shape,
And I had his, sir Robert's his, like him;
And if my legs were two such riding-rods,
My arms such eel-skins stuff'd, my face so thin
That in mine ear I durst not stick a rose
Lest men should say 'Look, where three-farthings goes!'
And, to his shape, were heir to all this land,
Would I might never stir from off this place,
I would give it every foot to have this face;
I would not be sir Nob in any case.

Queen Elinor. I like thee well: wilt thou forsake thy fortune,
Bequeath thy land to him and follow me?
I am a soldier and now bound to France.


8

I,1,161

Philip the Bastard. Brother, take you my land, I'll take my chance.
Your face hath got five hundred pound a year,
Yet sell your face for five pence and 'tis dear.
Madam, I'll follow you unto the death.

Queen Elinor. Nay, I would have you go before me thither.


9

I,1,173

Philip the Bastard. Brother by the mother's side, give me your hand:
My father gave me honour, yours gave land.
Now blessed by the hour, by night or day,
When I was got, sir Robert was away!

Queen Elinor. The very spirit of Plantagenet!
I am thy grandam, Richard; call me so.


10

II,1,414

King Phillip. Excuse; it is to beat usurping down.

Queen Elinor. Who is it thou dost call usurper, France?


11

II,1,416

Constance. Let me make answer; thy usurping son.

Queen Elinor. Out, insolent! thy bastard shall be king,
That thou mayst be a queen, and cheque the world!


12

II,1,426

Constance. My bed was ever to thy son as true
As thine was to thy husband; and this boy
Liker in feature to his father Geffrey
Than thou and John in manners; being as like
As rain to water, or devil to his dam.
My boy a bastard! By my soul, I think
His father never was so true begot:
It cannot be, an if thou wert his mother.

Queen Elinor. There's a good mother, boy, that blots thy father.


13

II,1,456

King John. My life as soon: I do defy thee, France.
Arthur of Bretagne, yield thee to my hand;
And out of my dear love I'll give thee more
Than e'er the coward hand of France can win:
Submit thee, boy.

Queen Elinor. Come to thy grandam, child.


14

II,1,464

Arthur. Good my mother, peace!
I would that I were low laid in my grave:
I am not worth this coil that's made for me.

Queen Elinor. His mother shames him so, poor boy, he weeps.


15

II,1,471

Constance. Now shame upon you, whether she does or no!
His grandam's wrongs, and not his mother's shames,
Draws those heaven-moving pearls from his poor eyes,
Which heaven shall take in nature of a fee;
Ay, with these crystal beads heaven shall be bribed
To do him justice and revenge on you.

Queen Elinor. Thou monstrous slanderer of heaven and earth!


16

II,1,490

Constance. I have but this to say,
That he is not only plagued for her sin,
But God hath made her sin and her the plague
On this removed issue, plague for her
And with her plague; her sin his injury,
Her injury the beadle to her sin,
All punish'd in the person of this child,
And all for her; a plague upon her!

Queen Elinor. Thou unadvised scold, I can produce
A will that bars the title of thy son.


17

II,1,780

Philip the Bastard. Here's a stay
That shakes the rotten carcass of old Death
Out of his rags! Here's a large mouth, indeed,
That spits forth death and mountains, rocks and seas,
Talks as familiarly of roaring lions
As maids of thirteen do of puppy-dogs!
What cannoneer begot this lusty blood?
He speaks plain cannon fire, and smoke and bounce;
He gives the bastinado with his tongue:
Our ears are cudgell'd; not a word of his
But buffets better than a fist of France:
Zounds! I was never so bethump'd with words
Since I first call'd my brother's father dad.

Queen Elinor. Son, list to this conjunction, make this match;
Give with our niece a dowry large enough:
For by this knot thou shalt so surely tie
Thy now unsured assurance to the crown,
That yon green boy shall have no sun to ripe
The bloom that promiseth a mighty fruit.
I see a yielding in the looks of France;
Mark, how they whisper: urge them while their souls
Are capable of this ambition,
Lest zeal, now melted by the windy breath
Of soft petitions, pity and remorse,
Cool and congeal again to what it was.


18

III,1,1118

Cardinal Pandulph. Philip of France, on peril of a curse,
Let go the hand of that arch-heretic;
And raise the power of France upon his head,
Unless he do submit himself to Rome.

Queen Elinor. Look'st thou pale, France? do not let go thy hand.


19

III,1,1250

Constance. O fair return of banish'd majesty!

Queen Elinor. O foul revolt of French inconstancy!


20

III,3,1316

Philip the Bastard. Bell, book, and candle shall not drive me back,
When gold and silver becks me to come on.
I leave your highness. Grandam, I will pray,
If ever I remember to be holy,
For your fair safety; so, I kiss your hand.

Queen Elinor. Farewell, gentle cousin.


21

III,3,1319

(stage directions). [Exit the BASTARD]

Queen Elinor. Come hither, little kinsman; hark, a word.


22

III,3,1377

King John. Enough.
I could be merry now. Hubert, I love thee;
Well, I'll not say what I intend for thee:
Remember. Madam, fare you well:
I'll send those powers o'er to your majesty.

Queen Elinor. My blessing go with thee!


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