Speeches (Lines) for Proteus
in "Two Gentlemen of Verona"

Total: 147

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,12

Wilt thou be gone? Sweet Valentine, adieu!
Think on thy Proteus, when thou haply seest...

2

I,1,21

Upon some book I love I'll pray for thee.

3

I,1,24

That's a deep story of a deeper love:
For he was more than over shoes in love.

4

I,1,28

Over the boots? nay, give me not the boots.

5

I,1,30

What?

6

I,1,38

So, by your circumstance, you call me fool.

7

I,1,40

'Tis love you cavil at: I am not Love.

8

I,1,44

Yet writers say, as in the sweetest bud
The eating canker dwells, so eating love...

9

I,1,57

And thither will I bring thee, Valentine.

10

I,1,63

All happiness bechance to thee in Milan!

11

I,1,66

He after honour hunts, I after love:
He leaves his friends to dignify them more,...

12

I,1,75

But now he parted hence, to embark for Milan.

13

I,1,78

Indeed, a sheep doth very often stray,
An if the shepherd be a while away.

14

I,1,82

I do.

15

I,1,84

A silly answer and fitting well a sheep.

16

I,1,86

True; and thy master a shepherd.

17

I,1,88

It shall go hard but I'll prove it by another.

18

I,1,92

The sheep for fodder follow the shepherd; the
shepherd for food follows not the sheep: thou for...

19

I,1,97

But, dost thou hear? gavest thou my letter to Julia?

20

I,1,101

Here's too small a pasture for such store of muttons.

21

I,1,103

Nay: in that you are astray, 'twere best pound you.

22

I,1,106

You mistake; I mean the pound,—a pinfold.

23

I,1,110

But what said she?

24

I,1,112

Nod—Ay—why, that's noddy.

25

I,1,115

And that set together is noddy.

26

I,1,118

No, no; you shall have it for bearing the letter.

27

I,1,120

Why sir, how do you bear with me?

28

I,1,123

Beshrew me, but you have a quick wit.

29

I,1,125

Come come, open the matter in brief: what said she?

30

I,1,128

Well, sir, here is for your pains. What said she?

31

I,1,130

Why, couldst thou perceive so much from her?

32

I,1,137

What said she? nothing?

33

I,1,142

Go, go, be gone, to save your ship from wreck,
Which cannot perish having thee aboard,...

34

I,3,349

Sweet love! sweet lines! sweet life!
Here is her hand, the agent of her heart;...

35

I,3,356

May't please your lordship, 'tis a word or two
Of commendations sent from Valentine,...

36

I,3,360

There is no news, my lord, but that he writes
How happily he lives, how well beloved...

37

I,3,365

As one relying on your lordship's will
And not depending on his friendly wish.

38

I,3,376

My lord, I cannot be so soon provided:
Please you, deliberate a day or two.

39

I,3,383

Thus have I shunn'd the fire for fear of burning,
And drench'd me in the sea, where I am drown'd....

40

I,3,396

Why, this it is: my heart accords thereto,
And yet a thousand times it answers 'no.'

41

II,2,566

Have patience, gentle Julia.

42

II,2,568

When possibly I can, I will return.

43

II,2,572

Why then, we'll make exchange; here, take you this.

44

II,2,574

Here is my hand for my true constancy;
And when that hour o'erslips me in the day...

45

II,2,589

Go; I come, I come.
Alas! this parting strikes poor lovers dumb.

46

II,4,760

Not so, sweet lady: but too mean a servant
To have a look of such a worthy mistress.

47

II,4,764

My duty will I boast of; nothing else.

48

II,4,767

I'll die on him that says so but yourself.

49

II,4,769

That you are worthless.

50

II,4,776

We'll both attend upon your ladyship.

51

II,4,779

Your friends are well and have them much commended.

52

II,4,781

I left them all in health.

53

II,4,783

My tales of love were wont to weary you;
I know you joy not in a love discourse.

54

II,4,800

Enough; I read your fortune in your eye.
Was this the idol that you worship so?

55

II,4,803

No; but she is an earthly paragon.

56

II,4,805

I will not flatter her.

57

II,4,807

When I was sick, you gave me bitter pills,
And I must minister the like to you.

58

II,4,812

Except my mistress.

59

II,4,815

Have I not reason to prefer mine own?

60

II,4,823

Why, Valentine, what braggardism is this?

61

II,4,827

Then let her alone.

62

II,4,838

But she loves you?

63

II,4,847

Go on before; I shall inquire you forth:
I must unto the road, to disembark...

64

II,4,852

I will.
[Exit VALENTINE]...

65

II,6,931

To leave my Julia, shall I be forsworn;
To love fair Silvia, shall I be forsworn;...

66

III,1,1072

My gracious lord, that which I would discover
The law of friendship bids me to conceal;...

67

III,1,1106

Know, noble lord, they have devised a mean
How he her chamber-window will ascend...

68

III,1,1118

Adieu, my Lord; Sir Valentine is coming.

69

III,1,1262

Run, boy, run, run, and seek him out.

70

III,1,1264

What seest thou?

71

III,1,1267

Valentine?

72

III,1,1269

Who then? his spirit?

73

III,1,1271

What then?

74

III,1,1274

Who wouldst thou strike?

75

III,1,1276

Villain, forbear.

76

III,1,1278

Sirrah, I say, forbear. Friend Valentine, a word.

77

III,1,1281

Then in dumb silence will I bury mine,
For they are harsh, untuneable and bad.

78

III,1,1284

No, Valentine.

79

III,1,1287

No, Valentine.

80

III,1,1291

That thou art banished—O, that's the news!—
From hence, from Silvia and from me thy friend.

81

III,1,1296

Ay, ay; and she hath offer'd to the doom—
Which, unreversed, stands in effectual force—...

82

III,1,1315

Cease to lament for that thou canst not help,
And study help for that which thou lament'st....

83

III,1,1333

Go, sirrah, find him out. Come, Valentine.

84

III,2,1465

Gone, my good lord.

85

III,2,1467

A little time, my lord, will kill that grief.

86

III,2,1472

Longer than I prove loyal to your grace
Let me not live to look upon your grace.

87

III,2,1476

I do, my lord.

88

III,2,1479

She did, my lord, when Valentine was here.

89

III,2,1483

The best way is to slander Valentine
With falsehood, cowardice and poor descent,...

90

III,2,1487

Ay, if his enemy deliver it:
Therefore it must with circumstance be spoken...

91

III,2,1491

And that, my lord, I shall be loath to do:
'Tis an ill office for a gentleman,...

92

III,2,1498

You have prevail'd, my lord; if I can do it
By ought that I can speak in his dispraise,...

93

III,2,1518

As much as I can do, I will effect:
But you, Sir Thurio, are not sharp enough;...

94

III,2,1525

Say that upon the altar of her beauty
You sacrifice your tears, your sighs, your heart:...

95

III,2,1548

We'll wait upon your grace till after supper,
And afterward determine our proceedings.

96

IV,2,1631

Already have I been false to Valentine
And now I must be as unjust to Thurio....

97

IV,2,1650

Ay, gentle Thurio: for you know that love
Will creep in service where it cannot go.

98

IV,2,1653

Sir, but I do; or else I would be hence.

99

IV,2,1655

Ay, Silvia; for your sake.

100

IV,2,1711

Sir Thurio, fear not you: I will so plead
That you shall say my cunning drift excels.

101

IV,2,1714

At Saint Gregory's well.

102

IV,2,1718

Madam, good even to your ladyship.

103

IV,2,1721

One, lady, if you knew his pure heart's truth,
You would quickly learn to know him by his voice.

104

IV,2,1724

Sir Proteus, gentle lady, and your servant.

105

IV,2,1726

That I may compass yours.

106

IV,2,1739

I grant, sweet love, that I did love a lady;
But she is dead.

107

IV,2,1747

I likewise hear that Valentine is dead.

108

IV,2,1750

Sweet lady, let me rake it from the earth.

109

IV,2,1754

Madam, if your heart be so obdurate,
Vouchsafe me yet your picture for my love,...

110

IV,2,1769

As wretches have o'ernight
That wait for execution in the morn.

111

IV,4,1874

Sebastian is thy name? I like thee well
And will employ thee in some service presently.

112

IV,4,1877

I hope thou wilt.
[To LAUNCE]...

113

IV,4,1882

And what says she to my little jewel?

114

IV,4,1885

But she received my dog?

115

IV,4,1888

What, didst thou offer her this from me?

116

IV,4,1893

Go get thee hence, and find my dog again,
Or ne'er return again into my sight....

117

IV,4,1911

Not so; I think she lives.

118

IV,4,1913

Why dost thou cry 'alas'?

119

IV,4,1916

Wherefore shouldst thou pity her?

120

IV,4,1923

Well, give her that ring and therewithal
This letter. That's her chamber. Tell my lady...

121

V,2,2066

O, sir, I find her milder than she was;
And yet she takes exceptions at your person.

122

V,2,2069

No; that it is too little.

123

V,2,2074

She says it is a fair one.

124

V,2,2076

But pearls are fair; and the old saying is,
Black men are pearls in beauteous ladies' eyes.

125

V,2,2082

Ill, when you talk of war.

126

V,2,2086

O, sir, she makes no doubt of that.

127

V,2,2089

That you are well derived.

128

V,2,2092

O, ay; and pities them.

129

V,2,2095

That they are out by lease.

130

V,2,2101

Nor I.

131

V,2,2103

Neither.

132

V,2,2125

And I will follow, more for Silvia's love
Than hate of Eglamour that goes with her.

133

V,4,2168

Madam, this service I have done for you,
Though you respect not aught your servant doth,...

134

V,4,2178

Unhappy were you, madam, ere I came;
But by my coming I have made you happy.

135

V,4,2190

What dangerous action, stood it next to death,
Would I not undergo for one calm look!...

136

V,4,2203

In love
Who respects friend?

137

V,4,2206

Nay, if the gentle spirit of moving words
Can no way change you to a milder form,...

138

V,4,2211

I'll force thee yield to my desire.

139

V,4,2214

Valentine!

140

V,4,2226

My shame and guilt confounds me.
Forgive me, Valentine: if hearty sorrow...

141

V,4,2240

Look to the boy.

142

V,4,2245

Where is that ring, boy?

143

V,4,2247

How! let me see:
Why, this is the ring I gave to Julia.

144

V,4,2251

But how camest thou by this ring? At my depart
I gave this unto Julia.

145

V,4,2255

How! Julia!

146

V,4,2265

Than men their minds! 'tis true.
O heaven! were man...

147

V,4,2275

Bear witness, Heaven, I have my wish for ever.

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