Speeches (Lines) for Prospero
in "Tempest"

Total: 114

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,98

Be collected:
No more amazement: tell your piteous heart...

2

I,2,102

No harm.
I have done nothing but in care of thee,...

3

I,2,111

'Tis time
I should inform thee farther. Lend thy hand,...

4

I,2,128

The hour's now come;
The very minute bids thee ope thine ear;...

5

I,2,135

By what? by any other house or person?
Of any thing the image tell me that...

6

I,2,142

Thou hadst, and more, Miranda. But how is it
That this lives in thy mind? What seest thou else...

7

I,2,148

Twelve year since, Miranda, twelve year since,
Thy father was the Duke of Milan and...

8

I,2,152

Thy mother was a piece of virtue, and
She said thou wast my daughter; and thy father...

9

I,2,159

Both, both, my girl:
By foul play, as thou say'st, were we heaved thence,...

10

I,2,165

My brother and thy uncle, call'd Antonio—
I pray thee, mark me—that a brother should...

11

I,2,179

Being once perfected how to grant suits,
How to deny them, who to advance and who...

12

I,2,189

I pray thee, mark me.
I, thus neglecting worldly ends, all dedicated...

13

I,2,209

To have no screen between this part he play'd
And him he play'd it for, he needs will be...

14

I,2,220

Mark his condition and the event; then tell me
If this might be a brother.

15

I,2,225

Now the condition.
The King of Naples, being an enemy...

16

I,2,242

Hear a little further
And then I'll bring thee to the present business...

17

I,2,248

Well demanded, wench:
My tale provokes that question. Dear, they durst not,...

18

I,2,263

O, a cherubim
Thou wast that did preserve me. Thou didst smile....

19

I,2,271

By Providence divine.
Some food we had and some fresh water that...

20

I,2,283

Now I arise:
[Resumes his mantle]...

21

I,2,293

Know thus far forth.
By accident most strange, bountiful Fortune,...

22

I,2,312

Hast thou, spirit,
Perform'd to point the tempest that I bade thee?

23

I,2,326

My brave spirit!
Who was so firm, so constant, that this coil...

24

I,2,337

Why that's my spirit!
But was not this nigh shore?

25

I,2,340

But are they, Ariel, safe?

26

I,2,349

Of the king's ship
The mariners say how thou hast disposed...

27

I,2,364

Ariel, thy charge
Exactly is perform'd: but there's more work....

28

I,2,368

At least two glasses. The time 'twixt six and now
Must by us both be spent most preciously.

29

I,2,373

How now? moody?
What is't thou canst demand?

30

I,2,376

Before the time be out? no more!

31

I,2,382

Dost thou forget
From what a torment I did free thee?

32

I,2,385

Thou dost, and think'st it much to tread the ooze
Of the salt deep,...

33

I,2,391

Thou liest, malignant thing! Hast thou forgot
The foul witch Sycorax, who with age and envy...

34

I,2,395

Thou hast. Where was she born? speak; tell me.

35

I,2,397

O, was she so? I must
Once in a month recount what thou hast been,...

36

I,2,405

This blue-eyed hag was hither brought with child
And here was left by the sailors. Thou, my slave,...

37

I,2,422

Dull thing, I say so; he, that Caliban
Whom now I keep in service. Thou best know'st...

38

I,2,432

If thou more murmur'st, I will rend an oak
And peg thee in his knotty entrails till...

39

I,2,438

Do so, and after two days
I will discharge thee.

40

I,2,442

Go make thyself like a nymph o' the sea: be subject
To no sight but thine and mine, invisible...

41

I,2,450

Shake it off. Come on;
We'll visit Caliban my slave, who never...

42

I,2,455

But, as 'tis,
We cannot miss him: he does make our fire,...

43

I,2,461

Come forth, I say! there's other business for thee:
Come, thou tortoise! when?...

44

I,2,468

Thou poisonous slave, got by the devil himself
Upon thy wicked dam, come forth!

45

I,2,475

For this, be sure, to-night thou shalt have cramps,
Side-stitches that shall pen thy breath up; urchins...

46

I,2,496

Thou most lying slave,
Whom stripes may move, not kindness! I have used thee,...

47

I,2,520

Hag-seed, hence!
Fetch us in fuel; and be quick, thou'rt best,...

48

I,2,532

So, slave; hence!
[Exit CALIBAN]...

49

I,2,572

The fringed curtains of thine eye advance
And say what thou seest yond.

50

I,2,577

No, wench; it eats and sleeps and hath such senses
As we have, such. This gallant which thou seest...

51

I,2,586

[Aside] It goes on, I see,
As my soul prompts it. Spirit, fine spirit! I'll free thee...

52

I,2,601

How? the best?
What wert thou, if the King of Naples heard thee?

53

I,2,611

[Aside]. The Duke of Milan
And his more braver daughter could control thee,...

54

I,2,626

Soft, sir! one word more.
[Aside]...

55

I,2,641

Follow me.
Speak not you for him; he's a traitor. Come;...

56

I,2,654

What? I say,
My foot my tutor? Put thy sword up, traitor;...

57

I,2,661

Hence! hang not on my garments.

58

I,2,664

Silence! one word more
Shall make me chide thee, if not hate thee. What!...

59

I,2,674

Come on; obey:
Thy nerves are in their infancy again...

60

I,2,686

[Aside] It works.
[To FERDINAND]...

61

I,2,698

Thou shalt be free
As mountain winds: but then exactly do...

62

I,2,702

Come, follow. Speak not for him.

63

III,1,1315

Poor worm, thou art infected!
This visitation shows it.

64

III,1,1366

Fair encounter
Of two most rare affections! Heavens rain grace...

65

III,1,1389

So glad of this as they I cannot be,
Who are surprised withal; but my rejoicing...

66

III,3,1602

[Aside] Honest lord,
Thou hast said well; for some of you there present...

67

III,3,1609

[Aside]. Praise in departing.

68

III,3,1664

Bravely the figure of this harpy hast thou
Perform'd, my Ariel; a grace it had, devouring:...

69

IV,1,1700

If I have too austerely punish'd you,
Your compensation makes amends, for I...

70

IV,1,1713

Then, as my gift and thine own acquisition
Worthily purchased take my daughter: but...

71

IV,1,1733

Fairly spoke.
Sit then and talk with her; she is thine own....

72

IV,1,1738

Thou and thy meaner fellows your last service
Did worthily perform; and I must use you...

73

IV,1,1747

Ay, with a twink.

74

IV,1,1753

Dearly my delicate Ariel. Do not approach
Till thou dost hear me call.

75

IV,1,1757

Look thou be true; do not give dalliance
Too much the rein: the strongest oaths are straw...

76

IV,1,1764

Well.
Now come, my Ariel! bring a corollary,...

77

IV,1,1837

Spirits, which by mine art
I have from their confines call'd to enact...

78

IV,1,1845

Sweet, now, silence!
Juno and Ceres whisper seriously;...

79

IV,1,1867

[Aside] I had forgot that foul conspiracy
Of the beast Caliban and his confederates...

80

IV,1,1877

You do look, my son, in a moved sort,
As if you were dismay'd: be cheerful, sir....

81

IV,1,1897

Come with a thought I thank thee, Ariel: come.

82

IV,1,1900

Spirit,
We must prepare to meet with Caliban.

83

IV,1,1905

Say again, where didst thou leave these varlets?

84

IV,1,1921

This was well done, my bird.
Thy shape invisible retain thou still:...

85

IV,1,1927

A devil, a born devil, on whose nature
Nurture can never stick; on whom my pains,...

86

IV,1,1999

Hey, Mountain, hey!

87

IV,1,2001

Fury, Fury! there, Tyrant, there! hark! hark!
[CALIBAN, STEPHANO, and TRINCULO, are]...

88

IV,1,2009

Let them be hunted soundly. At this hour
Lie at my mercy all mine enemies:...

89

V,1,2016

Now does my project gather to a head:
My charms crack not; my spirits obey; and time...

90

V,1,2021

I did say so,
When first I raised the tempest. Say, my spirit,...

91

V,1,2037

Dost thou think so, spirit?

92

V,1,2039

And mine shall.
Hast thou, which art but air, a touch, a feeling...

93

V,1,2054

Ye elves of hills, brooks, standing lakes and groves,
And ye that on the sands with printless foot...

94

V,1,2125

Why, that's my dainty Ariel! I shall miss thee:
But yet thou shalt have freedom: so, so, so....

95

V,1,2138

Behold, sir king,
The wronged Duke of Milan, Prospero:...

96

V,1,2154

First, noble friend,
Let me embrace thine age, whose honour cannot...

97

V,1,2159

You do yet taste
Some subtilties o' the isle, that will not let you...

98

V,1,2168

No.
For you, most wicked sir, whom to call brother...

99

V,1,2180

I am woe for't, sir.

100

V,1,2183

I rather think
You have not sought her help, of whose soft grace...

101

V,1,2188

As great to me as late; and, supportable
To make the dear loss, have I means much weaker...

102

V,1,2197

In this last tempest. I perceive these lords
At this encounter do so much admire...

103

V,1,2237

'Tis new to thee.

104

V,1,2254

There, sir, stop:
Let us not burthen our remembrance with...

105

V,1,2290

[Aside to ARIEL] My tricksy spirit!

106

V,1,2306

[Aside to ARIEL] Bravely, my diligence. Thou shalt be free.

107

V,1,2311

Sir, my liege,
Do not infest your mind with beating on...

108

V,1,2341

Mark but the badges of these men, my lords,
Then say if they be true. This mis-shapen knave,...

109

V,1,2362

You'ld be king o' the isle, sirrah?

110

V,1,2366

He is as disproportion'd in his manners
As in his shape. Go, sirrah, to my cell;...

111

V,1,2374

Go to; away!

112

V,1,2378

Sir, I invite your highness and your train
To my poor cell, where you shall take your rest...

113

V,1,2393

I'll deliver all;
And promise you calm seas, auspicious gales...

114

V,1,2404

Now my charms are all o'erthrown,
And what strength I have's mine own,...

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