Speeches (Lines) for Prince Edward
in "Henry VI, Part III"

Total: 16

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,243

Queen Margaret. Who can be patient in such extremes?
Ah, wretched man! would I had died a maid
And never seen thee, never borne thee son,
Seeing thou hast proved so unnatural a father
Hath he deserved to lose his birthright thus?
Hadst thou but loved him half so well as I,
Or felt that pain which I did for him once,
Or nourish'd him as I did with my blood,
Thou wouldst have left thy dearest heart-blood there,
Rather than have that savage duke thine heir
And disinherited thine only son.

Prince Edward. Father, you cannot disinherit me:
If you be king, why should not I succeed?


2

I,1,278

Queen Margaret. Ay, to be murder'd by his enemies.

Prince Edward. When I return with victory from the field
I'll see your grace: till then I'll follow her.


3

II,2,905

Henry VI. Edward Plantagenet, arise a knight;
And learn this lesson, draw thy sword in right.

Prince Edward. My gracious father, by your kingly leave,
I'll draw it as apparent to the crown,
And in that quarrel use it to the death.


4

II,2,921

Earl of Northumberland. Be it with resolution then to fight.

Prince Edward. My royal father, cheer these noble lords
And hearten those that fight in your defence:
Unsheathe your sword, good father; cry 'Saint George!'
[March. Enter EDWARD, GEORGE, RICHARD, WARWICK,]
NORFOLK, MONTAGUE, and Soldiers]


5

II,2,976

Earl of Warwick. If thou deny, their blood upon thy head;
For York in justice puts his armour on.

Prince Edward. If that be right which Warwick says is right,
There is no wrong, but every thing is right.


6

II,5,1234

Henry VI. Sad-hearted men, much overgone with care,
Here sits a king more woful than you are.
[Alarums: excursions. Enter QUEEN MARGARET, PRINCE]
EDWARD, and EXETER]

Prince Edward. Fly, father, fly! for all your friends are fled,
And Warwick rages like a chafed bull:
Away! for death doth hold us in pursuit.


7

III,3,1772

Earl of Warwick. Injurious Margaret!

Prince Edward. And why not queen?


8

III,3,1837

King Lewis XI. Then, Warwick, thus: our sister shall be Edward's;
And now forthwith shall articles be drawn
Touching the jointure that your king must make,
Which with her dowry shall be counterpoised.
Draw near, Queen Margaret, and be a witness
That Bona shall be wife to the English king.

Prince Edward. To Edward, but not to the English king.


9

III,3,1871

Earl Oxford. I like it well that our fair queen and mistress
Smiles at her news, while Warwick frowns at his.

Prince Edward. Nay, mark how Lewis stamps, as he were nettled:
I hope all's for the best.


10

III,3,1953

Queen Margaret. Yes, I agree, and thank you for your motion.
Son Edward, she is fair and virtuous,
Therefore delay not, give thy hand to Warwick;
And, with thy hand, thy faith irrevocable,
That only Warwick's daughter shall be thine.

Prince Edward. Yes, I accept her, for she well deserves it;
And here, to pledge my vow, I give my hand.


11

V,4,2843

Queen Margaret. Great lords, wise men ne'er sit and wail their loss,
But cheerly seek how to redress their harms.
What though the mast be now blown overboard,
The cable broke, the holding-anchor lost,
And half our sailors swallow'd in the flood?
Yet lives our pilot still. Is't meet that he
Should leave the helm and like a fearful lad
With tearful eyes add water to the sea
And give more strength to that which hath too much,
Whiles, in his moan, the ship splits on the rock,
Which industry and courage might have saved?
Ah, what a shame! ah, what a fault were this!
Say Warwick was our anchor; what of that?
And Montague our topmost; what of him?
Our slaughter'd friends the tackles; what of these?
Why, is not Oxford here another anchor?
And Somerset another goodly mast?
The friends of France our shrouds and tacklings?
And, though unskilful, why not Ned and I
For once allow'd the skilful pilot's charge?
We will not from the helm to sit and weep,
But keep our course, though the rough wind say no,
From shelves and rocks that threaten us with wreck.
As good to chide the waves as speak them fair.
And what is Edward but ruthless sea?
What Clarence but a quicksand of deceit?
And Richard but a ragged fatal rock?
All these the enemies to our poor bark.
Say you can swim; alas, 'tis but a while!
Tread on the sand; why, there you quickly sink:
Bestride the rock; the tide will wash you off,
Or else you famish; that's a threefold death.
This speak I, lords, to let you understand,
If case some one of you would fly from us,
That there's no hoped-for mercy with the brothers
More than with ruthless waves, with sands and rocks.
Why, courage then! what cannot be avoided
'Twere childish weakness to lament or fear.

Prince Edward. Methinks a woman of this valiant spirit
Should, if a coward heard her speak these words,
Infuse his breast with magnanimity
And make him, naked, foil a man at arms.
I speak not this as doubting any here
For did I but suspect a fearful man
He should have leave to go away betimes,
Lest in our need he might infect another
And make him of like spirit to himself.
If any such be here—as God forbid!—
Let him depart before we need his help.


12

V,4,2863

Queen Margaret. Thanks, gentle Somerset; sweet Oxford, thanks.

Prince Edward. And take his thanks that yet hath nothing else.


13

V,5,2912

King Edward IV (Plantagenet). Bring forth the gallant, let us hear him speak.
What! can so young a thorn begin to prick?
Edward, what satisfaction canst thou make
For bearing arms, for stirring up my subjects,
And all the trouble thou hast turn'd me to?

Prince Edward. Speak like a subject, proud ambitious York!
Suppose that I am now my father's mouth;
Resign thy chair, and where I stand kneel thou,
Whilst I propose the selfsame words to thee,
Which traitor, thou wouldst have me answer to.


14

V,5,2920

Richard III (Duke of Gloucester). That you might still have worn the petticoat,
And ne'er have stol'n the breech from Lancaster.

Prince Edward. Let AEsop fable in a winter's night;
His currish riddles sort not with this place.


15

V,5,2925

Richard III (Duke of Gloucester). For God's sake, take away this captive scold.

Prince Edward. Nay, take away this scolding crookback rather.


16

V,5,2928

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). Untutor'd lad, thou art too malapert.

Prince Edward. I know my duty; you are all undutiful:
Lascivious Edward, and thou perjured George,
And thou mis-shapen Dick, I tell ye all
I am your better, traitors as ye are:
And thou usurp'st my father's right and mine.


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