Speeches (Lines) for Portia
in "Merchant of Venice"

Total: 117

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,195

By my troth, Nerissa, my little body is aweary of
this great world.

2

I,2,204

Good sentences and well pronounced.

3

I,2,206

If to do were as easy as to know what were good to
do, chapels had been churches and poor men's...

4

I,2,229

I pray thee, over-name them; and as thou namest
them, I will describe them; and, according to my...

5

I,2,233

Ay, that's a colt indeed, for he doth nothing but
talk of his horse; and he makes it a great...

6

I,2,239

He doth nothing but frown, as who should say 'If you
will not have me, choose:' he hears merry tales and...

7

I,2,248

God made him, and therefore let him pass for a man.
In truth, I know it is a sin to be a mocker: but,...

8

I,2,260

You know I say nothing to him, for he understands
not me, nor I him: he hath neither Latin, French,...

9

I,2,270

That he hath a neighbourly charity in him, for he
borrowed a box of the ear of the Englishman and...

10

I,2,276

Very vilely in the morning, when he is sober, and
most vilely in the afternoon, when he is drunk: when...

11

I,2,285

Therefore, for fear of the worst, I pray thee, set a
deep glass of rhenish wine on the contrary casket,...

12

I,2,296

If I live to be as old as Sibylla, I will die as
chaste as Diana, unless I be obtained by the manner...

13

I,2,305

Yes, yes, it was Bassanio; as I think, he was so called.

14

I,2,308

I remember him well, and I remember him worthy of
thy praise....

15

I,2,316

If I could bid the fifth welcome with so good a
heart as I can bid the other four farewell, I should...

16

II,1,527

In terms of choice I am not solely led
By nice direction of a maiden's eyes;...

17

II,1,554

You must take your chance,
And either not attempt to choose at all...

18

II,1,560

First, forward to the temple: after dinner
Your hazard shall be made.

19

II,7,987

Go draw aside the curtains and discover
The several caskets to this noble prince....

20

II,7,997

The one of them contains my picture, prince:
If you choose that, then I am yours withal.

21

II,7,1047

There, take it, prince; and if my form lie there,
Then I am yours.

22

II,7,1068

A gentle riddance. Draw the curtains, go.
Let all of his complexion choose me so.

23

II,9,1134

Behold, there stand the caskets, noble prince:
If you choose that wherein I am contain'd,...

24

II,9,1146

To these injunctions every one doth swear
That comes to hazard for my worthless self.

25

II,9,1183

Too long a pause for that which you find there.

26

II,9,1191

To offend, and judge, are distinct offices
And of opposed natures.

27

II,9,1212

Thus hath the candle singed the moth.
O, these deliberate fools! when they do choose,...

28

II,9,1217

Come, draw the curtain, Nerissa.

29

II,9,1220

Here: what would my lord?

30

II,9,1231

No more, I pray thee: I am half afeard
Thou wilt say anon he is some kin to thee,...

31

III,2,1364

I pray you, tarry: pause a day or two
Before you hazard; for, in choosing wrong,...

32

III,2,1390

Upon the rack, Bassanio! then confess
What treason there is mingled with your love.

33

III,2,1396

Ay, but I fear you speak upon the rack,
Where men enforced do speak anything.

34

III,2,1399

Well then, confess and live.

35

III,2,1405

Away, then! I am lock'd in one of them:
If you do love me, you will find me out....

36

III,2,1475

[Aside] How all the other passions fleet to air,
As doubtful thoughts, and rash-embraced despair,...

37

III,2,1519

You see me, Lord Bassanio, where I stand,
Such as I am: though for myself alone...

38

III,2,1579

Is this true, Nerissa?

39

III,2,1596

So do I, my lord:
They are entirely welcome.

40

III,2,1618

There are some shrewd contents in yon same paper,
That steals the colour from Bassanio's cheek:...

41

III,2,1668

Is it your dear friend that is thus in trouble?

42

III,2,1674

What sum owes he the Jew?

43

III,2,1676

What, no more?
Pay him six thousand, and deface the bond;...

44

III,2,1701

O love, dispatch all business, and be gone!

45

III,4,1759

I never did repent for doing good,
Nor shall not now: for in companions...

46

III,4,1787

My people do already know my mind,
And will acknowledge you and Jessica...

47

III,4,1793

I thank you for your wish, and am well pleased
To wish it back on you: fare you well Jessica....

48

III,4,1809

Come on, Nerissa; I have work in hand
That you yet know not of: we'll see our husbands...

49

III,4,1813

They shall, Nerissa; but in such a habit,
That they shall think we are accomplished...

50

III,4,1833

Fie, what a question's that,
If thou wert near a lewd interpreter!...

51

IV,1,2107

I did, my lord.

52

IV,1,2111

I am informed thoroughly of the cause.
Which is the merchant here, and which the Jew?

53

IV,1,2114

Is your name Shylock?

54

IV,1,2116

Of a strange nature is the suit you follow;
Yet in such rule that the Venetian law...

55

IV,1,2121

Do you confess the bond?

56

IV,1,2123

Then must the Jew be merciful.

57

IV,1,2125

The quality of mercy is not strain'd,
It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven...

58

IV,1,2149

Is he not able to discharge the money?

59

IV,1,2159

It must not be; there is no power in Venice
Can alter a decree established:...

60

IV,1,2166

I pray you, let me look upon the bond.

61

IV,1,2168

Shylock, there's thrice thy money offer'd thee.

62

IV,1,2172

Why, this bond is forfeit;
And lawfully by this the Jew may claim...

63

IV,1,2187

Why then, thus it is:
You must prepare your bosom for his knife.

64

IV,1,2190

For the intent and purpose of the law
Hath full relation to the penalty,...

65

IV,1,2195

Therefore lay bare your bosom.

66

IV,1,2199

It is so. Are there balance here to weigh
The flesh?

67

IV,1,2202

Have by some surgeon, Shylock, on your charge,
To stop his wounds, lest he do bleed to death.

68

IV,1,2205

It is not so express'd: but what of that?
'Twere good you do so much for charity.

69

IV,1,2208

You, merchant, have you any thing to say?

70

IV,1,2233

Your wife would give you little thanks for that,
If she were by, to hear you make the offer.

71

IV,1,2245

A pound of that same merchant's flesh is thine:
The court awards it, and the law doth give it.

72

IV,1,2248

And you must cut this flesh from off his breast:
The law allows it, and the court awards it.

73

IV,1,2251

Tarry a little; there is something else.
This bond doth give thee here no jot of blood;...

74

IV,1,2261

Thyself shalt see the act:
For, as thou urgest justice, be assured...

75

IV,1,2268

Soft!
The Jew shall have all justice; soft! no haste:...

76

IV,1,2272

Therefore prepare thee to cut off the flesh.
Shed thou no blood, nor cut thou less nor more...

77

IV,1,2283

Why doth the Jew pause? take thy forfeiture.

78

IV,1,2286

He hath refused it in the open court:
He shall have merely justice and his bond.

79

IV,1,2291

Thou shalt have nothing but the forfeiture,
To be so taken at thy peril, Jew.

80

IV,1,2295

Tarry, Jew:
The law hath yet another hold on you....

81

IV,1,2322

Ay, for the state, not for Antonio.

82

IV,1,2327

What mercy can you render him, Antonio?

83

IV,1,2342

Art thou contented, Jew? what dost thou say?

84

IV,1,2344

Clerk, draw a deed of gift.

85

IV,1,2354

I humbly do desire your grace of pardon:
I must away this night toward Padua,...

86

IV,1,2368

He is well paid that is well satisfied;
And I, delivering you, am satisfied...

87

IV,1,2378

You press me far, and therefore I will yield.
[To ANTONIO]...

88

IV,1,2387

I will have nothing else but only this;
And now methinks I have a mind to it.

89

IV,1,2393

I see, sir, you are liberal in offers
You taught me first to beg; and now methinks...

90

IV,1,2399

That 'scuse serves many men to save their gifts.
An if your wife be not a mad-woman,...

91

IV,2,2417

Inquire the Jew's house out, give him this deed
And let him sign it: we'll away to-night...

92

IV,2,2426

That cannot be:
His ring I do accept most thankfully:...

93

IV,2,2435

[Aside to NERISSA] Thou mayst, I warrant.
We shall have old swearing...

94

V,1,2546

That light we see is burning in my hall.
How far that little candle throws his beams!...

95

V,1,2550

So doth the greater glory dim the less:
A substitute shines brightly as a king...

96

V,1,2556

Nothing is good, I see, without respect:
Methinks it sounds much sweeter than by day.

97

V,1,2559

The crow doth sing as sweetly as the lark,
When neither is attended, and I think...

98

V,1,2571

He knows me as the blind man knows the cuckoo,
By the bad voice.

99

V,1,2574

We have been praying for our husbands' healths,
Which speed, we hope, the better for our words....

100

V,1,2580

Go in, Nerissa;
Give order to my servants that they take...

101

V,1,2587

This night methinks is but the daylight sick;
It looks a little paler: 'tis a day,...

102

V,1,2594

Let me give light, but let me not be light;
For a light wife doth make a heavy husband,...

103

V,1,2601

You should in all sense be much bound to him.
For, as I hear, he was much bound for you.

104

V,1,2604

Sir, you are very welcome to our house:
It must appear in other ways than words,...

105

V,1,2611

A quarrel, ho, already! what's the matter?

106

V,1,2631

You were to blame, I must be plain with you,
To part so slightly with your wife's first gift:...

107

V,1,2650

What ring gave you my lord?
Not that, I hope, which you received of me.

108

V,1,2655

Even so void is your false heart of truth.
By heaven, I will ne'er come in your bed...

109

V,1,2667

If you had known the virtue of the ring,
Or half her worthiness that gave the ring,...

110

V,1,2691

Let not that doctor e'er come near my house:
Since he hath got the jewel that I loved,...

111

V,1,2707

Sir, grieve not you; you are welcome notwithstanding.

112

V,1,2712

Mark you but that!
In both my eyes he doubly sees himself;...

113

V,1,2724

Then you shall be his surety. Give him this
And bid him keep it better than the other.

114

V,1,2728

I had it of him: pardon me, Bassanio;
For, by this ring, the doctor lay with me.

115

V,1,2736

Speak not so grossly. You are all amazed:
Here is a letter; read it at your leisure;...

116

V,1,2760

How now, Lorenzo!
My clerk hath some good comforts too for you.

117

V,1,2768

It is almost morning,
And yet I am sure you are not satisfied...

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