Speeches (Lines) for Pompey
in "Antony and Cleopatra"

Total: 41

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,1,616

If the great gods be just, they shall assist
The deeds of justest men.

2

II,1,620

Whiles we are suitors to their throne, decays
The thing we sue for.

3

II,1,626

I shall do well:
The people love me, and the sea is mine;
My powers are crescent, and my auguring hope
Says it will come to the full. Mark Antony
In Egypt sits at dinner, and will make
No wars without doors: Caesar gets money where
He loses hearts: Lepidus flatters both,
Of both is flatter'd; but he neither loves,
Nor either cares for him.

4

II,1,637

Where have you this? 'tis false.

5

II,1,639

He dreams: I know they are in Rome together,
Looking for Antony. But all the charms of love,
Salt Cleopatra, soften thy waned lip!
Let witchcraft join with beauty, lust with both!
Tie up the libertine in a field of feasts,
Keep his brain fuming; Epicurean cooks
Sharpen with cloyless sauce his appetite;
That sleep and feeding may prorogue his honour
Even till a Lethe'd dulness!
[Enter VARRIUS]
How now, Varrius!

6

II,1,654

I could have given less matter
A better ear. Menas, I did not think
This amorous surfeiter would have donn'd his helm
For such a petty war: his soldiership
Is twice the other twain: but let us rear
The higher our opinion, that our stirring
Can from the lap of Egypt's widow pluck
The ne'er-lust-wearied Antony.

7

II,1,667

I know not, Menas,
How lesser enmities may give way to greater.
Were't not that we stand up against them all,
'Twere pregnant they should square between
themselves;
For they have entertained cause enough
To draw their swords: but how the fear of us
May cement their divisions and bind up
The petty difference, we yet not know.
Be't as our gods will have't! It only stands
Our lives upon to use our strongest hands.
Come, Menas.

8

II,6,1212

Your hostages I have, so have you mine;
And we shall talk before we fight.

9

II,6,1221

To you all three,
The senators alone of this great world,
Chief factors for the gods, I do not know
Wherefore my father should revengers want,
Having a son and friends; since Julius Caesar,
Who at Philippi the good Brutus ghosted,
There saw you labouring for him. What was't
That moved pale Cassius to conspire; and what
Made the all-honour'd, honest Roman, Brutus,
With the arm'd rest, courtiers and beauteous freedom,
To drench the Capitol; but that they would
Have one man but a man? And that is it
Hath made me rig my navy; at whose burthen
The anger'd ocean foams; with which I meant
To scourge the ingratitude that despiteful Rome
Cast on my noble father.

10

II,6,1241

At land, indeed,
Thou dost o'er-count me of my father's house:
But, since the cuckoo builds not for himself,
Remain in't as thou mayst.

11

II,6,1253

You have made me offer
Of Sicily, Sardinia; and I must
Rid all the sea of pirates; then, to send
Measures of wheat to Rome; this 'greed upon
To part with unhack'd edges, and bear back
Our targes undinted.

12

II,6,1260

Know, then,
I came before you here a man prepared
To take this offer: but Mark Antony
Put me to some impatience: though I lose
The praise of it by telling, you must know,
When Caesar and your brother were at blows,
Your mother came to Sicily and did find
Her welcome friendly.

13

II,6,1271

Let me have your hand:
I did not think, sir, to have met you here.

14

II,6,1278

Well, I know not
What counts harsh fortune casts upon my face;
But in my bosom shall she never come,
To make my heart her vassal.

15

II,6,1283

I hope so, Lepidus. Thus we are agreed:
I crave our composition may be written,
And seal'd between us.

16

II,6,1287

We'll feast each other ere we part; and let's
Draw lots who shall begin.

17

II,6,1290

No, Antony, take the lot: but, first
Or last, your fine Egyptian cookery
Shall have the fame. I have heard that Julius Caesar
Grew fat with feasting there.

18

II,6,1295

I have fair meanings, sir.

19

II,6,1297

Then so much have I heard:
And I have heard, Apollodorus carried—

20

II,6,1300

What, I pray you?

21

II,6,1302

I know thee now: how farest thou, soldier?

22

II,6,1306

Let me shake thy hand;
I never hated thee: I have seen thee fight,
When I have envied thy behavior.

23

II,6,1313

Enjoy thy plainness,
It nothing ill becomes thee.
Aboard my galley I invite you all:
Will you lead, lords?

24

II,6,1318

Come.

25

II,7,1405

Sit,—and some wine! A health to Lepidus!

26

II,7,1412

[Aside to MENAS] Say in mine ear:
what is't?

27

II,7,1417

[Aside to MENAS] Forbear me till anon.
This wine for Lepidus!

28

II,7,1432

[Aside to MENAS] Go hang, sir, hang! Tell me of
that? away!
Do as I bid you. Where's this cup I call'd for?

29

II,7,1438

[Aside to MENAS] I think thou'rt mad.
The matter?

30

II,7,1442

Thou hast served me with much faith. What's else to say?
Be jolly, lords.

31

II,7,1447

What say'st thou?

32

II,7,1449

How should that be?

33

II,7,1453

Hast thou drunk well?

34

II,7,1458

Show me which way.

35

II,7,1463

Ah, this thou shouldst have done,
And not have spoke on't! In me 'tis villany;
In thee't had been good service. Thou must know,
'Tis not my profit that does lead mine honour;
Mine honour, it. Repent that e'er thy tongue
Hath so betray'd thine act: being done unknown,
I should have found it afterwards well done;
But must condemn it now. Desist, and drink.

36

II,7,1475

This health to Lepidus!

37

II,7,1479

Fill till the cup be hid.

38

II,7,1489

This is not yet an Alexandrian feast.

39

II,7,1503

Let's ha't, good soldier.

40

II,7,1529

I'll try you on the shore.

41

II,7,1531

O Antony,
You have my father's house,—But, what? we are friends.
Come, down into the boat.

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