Speeches (Lines) for Polixenes
in "Winter's Tale"

Total: 57

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,50

Nine changes of the watery star hath been
The shepherd's note since we have left our throne...

2

I,2,61

Sir, that's to-morrow.
I am question'd by my fears, of what may chance...

3

I,2,69

No longer stay.

4

I,2,71

Very sooth, to-morrow.

5

I,2,74

Press me not, beseech you, so.
There is no tongue that moves, none, none i' the world,...

6

I,2,103

No, madam.

7

I,2,105

I may not, verily.

8

I,2,118

Your guest, then, madam:
To be your prisoner should import offending;...

9

I,2,126

We were, fair queen,
Two lads that thought there was no more behind...

10

I,2,132

We were as twinn'd lambs that did frisk i' the sun,
And bleat the one at the other: what we changed...

11

I,2,143

O my most sacred lady!
Temptations have since then been born to's; for...

12

I,2,226

What means Sicilia?

13

I,2,228

How, my lord!
What cheer? how is't with you, best brother?

14

I,2,248

If at home, sir,
He's all my exercise, my mirth, my matter,...

15

I,2,480

This is strange: methinks
My favour here begins to warp. Not speak?...

16

I,2,484

What is the news i' the court?

17

I,2,486

The king hath on him such a countenance
As he had lost some province and a region...

18

I,2,495

How! dare not! do not. Do you know, and dare not?
Be intelligent to me: 'tis thereabouts;...

19

I,2,507

How! caught of me!
Make me not sighted like the basilisk:...

20

I,2,519

A sickness caught of me, and yet I well!
I must be answer'd. Dost thou hear, Camillo,...

21

I,2,534

On, good Camillo.

22

I,2,536

By whom, Camillo?

23

I,2,538

For what?

24

I,2,543

O, then my best blood turn
To an infected jelly and my name...

25

I,2,559

How should this grow?

26

I,2,575

I do believe thee:
I saw his heart in 's face. Give me thy hand:...

27

IV,2,1668

I pray thee, good Camillo, be no more importunate:
'tis a sickness denying thee any thing; a death to...

28

IV,2,1677

As thou lovest me, Camillo, wipe not out the rest of
thy services by leaving me now: the need I have of...

29

IV,2,1702

I have considered so much, Camillo, and with some
care; so far that I have eyes under my service which...

30

IV,2,1712

That's likewise part of my intelligence; but, I
fear, the angle that plucks our son thither. Thou...

31

IV,2,1721

My best Camillo! We must disguise ourselves.

32

IV,4,1947

Shepherdess,
A fair one are you—well you fit our ages...

33

IV,4,1958

Wherefore, gentle maiden,
Do you neglect them?

34

IV,4,1963

Say there be;
Yet nature is made better by no mean...

35

IV,4,1974

Then make your garden rich in gillyvors,
And do not call them bastards.

36

IV,4,2040

This is the prettiest low-born lass that ever
Ran on the green-sward: nothing she does or seems...

37

IV,4,2055

Pray, good shepherd, what fair swain is this
Which dances with your daughter?

38

IV,4,2066

She dances featly.

39

IV,4,2092

This is a brave fellow.

40

IV,4,2228

You weary those that refresh us: pray, let's see
these four threes of herdsmen.

41

IV,4,2238

O, father, you'll know more of that hereafter.
[To CAMILLO]...

42

IV,4,2266

What follows this?
How prettily the young swain seems to wash...

43

IV,4,2272

And this my neighbour too?

44

IV,4,2282

Fairly offer'd.

45

IV,4,2301

Soft, swain, awhile, beseech you;
Have you a father?

46

IV,4,2304

Knows he of this?

47

IV,4,2306

Methinks a father
Is at the nuptial of his son a guest...

48

IV,4,2318

By my white beard,
You offer him, if this be so, a wrong...

49

IV,4,2329

Let him know't.

50

IV,4,2331

Prithee, let him.

51

IV,4,2337

Mark your divorce, young sir,
[Discovering himself]...

52

IV,4,2347

I'll have thy beauty scratch'd with briers, and made
More homely than thy state. For thee, fond boy,...

53

V,3,3322

O, not by much.

54

V,3,3349

Dear my brother,
Let him that was the cause of this have power...

55

V,3,3365

Masterly done:
The very life seems warm upon her lip.

56

V,3,3425

She embraces him.

57

V,3,3428

Ay, and make't manifest where she has lived,
Or how stolen from the dead.

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