Speeches (Lines) for Pisanio
in "Cymbeline"

Total: 58

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,208

My lord your son drew on my master.

2

I,1,211

There might have been,
But that my master rather play'd than fought
And had no help of anger: they were parted
By gentlemen at hand.

3

I,1,221

On his command: he would not suffer me
To bring him to the haven; left these notes
Of what commands I should be subject to,
When 't pleased you to employ me.

4

I,1,228

I humbly thank your highness.

5

I,3,276

It was his queen, his queen!

6

I,3,278

And kiss'd it, madam.

7

I,3,281

No, madam; for so long
As he could make me with this eye or ear
Distinguish him from others, he did keep
The deck, with glove, or hat, or handkerchief,
Still waving, as the fits and stirs of 's mind
Could best express how slow his soul sail'd on,
How swift his ship.

8

I,3,291

Madam, so I did.

9

I,3,299

Be assured, madam,
With his next vantage.

10

I,3,319

Madam, I shall.

11

I,5,597

And shall do:
But when to my good lord I prove untrue,
I'll choke myself: there's all I'll do for you.

12

I,6,612

Madam, a noble gentleman of Rome,
Comes from my lord with letters.

13

I,6,666

I was going, sir,
To give him welcome.

14

II,3,1153

'Twill not be lost.

15

III,2,1507

How? of adultery? Wherefore write you not
What monster's her accuser? Leonatus,
O master! what a strange infection
Is fall'n into thy ear! What false Italian,
As poisonous-tongued as handed, hath prevail'd
On thy too ready hearing? Disloyal! No:
She's punish'd for her truth, and undergoes,
More goddess-like than wife-like, such assaults
As would take in some virtue. O my master!
Thy mind to her is now as low as were
Thy fortunes. How! that I should murder her?
Upon the love and truth and vows which I
Have made to thy command? I, her? her blood?
If it be so to do good service, never
Let me be counted serviceable. How look I,
That I should seem to lack humanity
so much as this fact comes to?
[Reading]
'Do't: the letter
that I have sent her, by her own command
Shall give thee opportunity.' O damn'd paper!
Black as the ink that's on thee! Senseless bauble,
Art thou a feodary for this act, and look'st
So virgin-like without? Lo, here she comes.
I am ignorant in what I am commanded.

16

III,2,1534

Madam, here is a letter from my lord.

17

III,2,1580

One score 'twixt sun and sun,
Madam, 's enough for you:
[Aside]
and too much too.

18

III,2,1593

Madam, you're best consider.

19

III,4,1738

Please you, read;
And you shall find me, wretched man, a thing
The most disdain'd of fortune.

20

III,4,1753

What shall I need to draw my sword? the paper
Hath cut her throat already. No, 'tis slander,
Whose edge is sharper than the sword, whose tongue
Outvenoms all the worms of Nile, whose breath
Rides on the posting winds and doth belie
All corners of the world: kings, queens and states,
Maids, matrons, nay, the secrets of the grave
This viperous slander enters. What cheer, madam?

21

III,4,1767

Alas, good lady!

22

III,4,1780

Good madam, hear me.

23

III,4,1797

Hence, vile instrument!
Thou shalt not damn my hand.

24

III,4,1826

O gracious lady,
Since I received command to do this business
I have not slept one wink.

25

III,4,1830

I'll wake mine eye-balls blind first.

26

III,4,1840

But to win time
To lose so bad employment; in the which
I have consider'd of a course. Good lady,
Hear me with patience.

27

III,4,1848

Then, madam,
I thought you would not back again.

28

III,4,1852

Not so, neither:
But if I were as wise as honest, then
My purpose would prove well. It cannot be
But that my master is abused:
Some villain, ay, and singular in his art.
Hath done you both this cursed injury.

29

III,4,1859

No, on my life.
I'll give but notice you are dead and send him
Some bloody sign of it; for 'tis commanded
I should do so: you shall be miss'd at court,
And that will well confirm it.

30

III,4,1868

If you'll back to the court—

31

III,4,1873

If not at court,
Then not in Britain must you bide.

32

III,4,1881

I am most glad
You think of other place. The ambassador,
Lucius the Roman, comes to Milford-Haven
To-morrow: now, if you could wear a mind
Dark as your fortune is, and but disguise
That which, to appear itself, must not yet be
But by self-danger, you should tread a course
Pretty and full of view; yea, haply, near
The residence of Posthumus; so nigh at least
That though his actions were not visible, yet
Report should render him hourly to your ear
As truly as he moves.

33

III,4,1896

Well, then, here's the point:
You must forget to be a woman; change
Command into obedience: fear and niceness—
The handmaids of all women, or, more truly,
Woman its pretty self—into a waggish courage:
Ready in gibes, quick-answer'd, saucy and
As quarrelous as the weasel; nay, you must
Forget that rarest treasure of your cheek,
Exposing it—but, O, the harder heart!
Alack, no remedy!—to the greedy touch
Of common-kissing Titan, and forget
Your laboursome and dainty trims, wherein
You made great Juno angry.

34

III,4,1912

First, make yourself but like one.
Fore-thinking this, I have already fit—
'Tis in my cloak-bag—doublet, hat, hose, all
That answer to them: would you in their serving,
And with what imitation you can borrow
From youth of such a season, 'fore noble Lucius
Present yourself, desire his service, tell him
wherein you're happy,—which you'll make him know,
If that his head have ear in music,—doubtless
With joy he will embrace you, for he's honourable
And doubling that, most holy. Your means abroad,
You have me, rich; and I will never fail
Beginning nor supplyment.

35

III,4,1931

Well, madam, we must take a short farewell,
Lest, being miss'd, I be suspected of
Your carriage from the court. My noble mistress,
Here is a box; I had it from the queen:
What's in't is precious; if you are sick at sea,
Or stomach-qualm'd at land, a dram of this
Will drive away distemper. To some shade,
And fit you to your manhood. May the gods
Direct you to the best!

36

III,5,2051

O, good my lord!

37

III,5,2058

Alas, my lord,
How can she be with him? When was she missed?
He is in Rome.

38

III,5,2064

O, my all-worthy lord!

39

III,5,2070

Then, sir,
This paper is the history of my knowledge
Touching her flight.

40

III,5,2076

[Aside] Or this, or perish.
She's far enough; and what he learns by this
May prove his travel, not her danger.

41

III,5,2080

[Aside] I'll write to my lord she's dead. O Imogen,
Safe mayst thou wander, safe return again!

42

III,5,2083

Sir, as I think.

43

III,5,2092

Well, my good lord.

44

III,5,2098

Sir, I will.

45

III,5,2101

I have, my lord, at my lodging, the same suit he
wore when he took leave of my lady and mistress.

46

III,5,2105

I shall, my lord.

47

III,5,2126

Ay, my noble lord.

48

III,5,2128

She can scarce be there yet.

49

III,5,2136

Thou bid'st me to my loss: for true to thee
Were to prove false, which I will never be,
To him that is most true. To Milford go,
And find not her whom thou pursuest. Flow, flow,
You heavenly blessings, on her! This fool's speed
Be cross'd with slowness; labour be his meed!

50

IV,3,2838

Sir, my life is yours;
I humbly set it at your will; but, for my mistress,
I nothing know where she remains, why gone,
Nor when she purposes return. Beseech your highness,
Hold me your loyal servant.

51

IV,3,2870

I heard no letter from my master since
I wrote him Imogen was slain: 'tis strange:
Nor hear I from my mistress who did promise
To yield me often tidings: neither know I
What is betid to Cloten; but remain
Perplex'd in all. The heavens still must work.
Wherein I am false I am honest; not true, to be true.
These present wars shall find I love my country,
Even to the note o' the king, or I'll fall in them.
All other doubts, by time let them be clear'd:
Fortune brings in some boats that are not steer'd.

52

V,5,3377

He hath been search'd among the dead and living,
But no trace of him.

53

V,5,3523

[Aside]. It is my mistress:
Since she is living, let the time run on
To good or bad.

54

V,5,3641

O, gentlemen, help!
Mine and your mistress! O, my lord Posthumus!
You ne'er kill'd Imogen til now. Help, help!
Mine honour'd lady!

55

V,5,3647

Wake, my mistress!

56

V,5,3650

How fares thy mistress?

57

V,5,3655

Lady,
The gods throw stones of sulphur on me, if
That box I gave you was not thought by me
A precious thing: I had it from the queen.

58

V,5,3702

My lord,
Now fear is from me, I'll speak troth. Lord Cloten,
Upon my lady's missing, came to me
With his sword drawn; foam'd at the mouth, and swore,
If I discover'd not which way she was gone,
It was my instant death. By accident,
had a feigned letter of my master's
Then in my pocket; which directed him
To seek her on the mountains near to Milford;
Where, in a frenzy, in my master's garments,
Which he enforced from me, away he posts
With unchaste purpose and with oath to violate
My lady's honour: what became of him
I further know not.

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