Speeches (Lines) for Philip the Bastard
in "King John"

Total: 89

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,56

Your faithful subject I, a gentleman
Born in Northamptonshire and eldest son,...

2

I,1,65

Most certain of one mother, mighty king;
That is well known; and, as I think, one father:...

3

I,1,72

I, madam? no, I have no reason for it;
That is my brother's plea and none of mine;...

4

I,1,79

I know not why, except to get the land.
But once he slander'd me with bastardy:...

5

I,1,98

Because he hath a half-face, like my father.
With half that face would he have all my land:...

6

I,1,103

Well, sir, by this you cannot get my land:
Your tale must be how he employ'd my mother.

7

I,1,138

Of no more force to dispossess me, sir,
Than was his will to get me, as I think.

8

I,1,144

Madam, an if my brother had my shape,
And I had his, sir Robert's his, like him;...

9

I,1,157

Brother, take you my land, I'll take my chance.
Your face hath got five hundred pound a year,...

10

I,1,162

Our country manners give our betters way.

11

I,1,164

Philip, my liege, so is my name begun,
Philip, good old sir Robert's wife's eldest son.

12

I,1,169

Brother by the mother's side, give me your hand:
My father gave me honour, yours gave land....

13

I,1,175

Madam, by chance but not by truth; what though?
Something about, a little from the right,...

14

I,1,186

Brother, adieu: good fortune come to thee!
For thou wast got i' the way of honesty....

15

I,1,232

My brother Robert? old sir Robert's son?
Colbrand the giant, that same mighty man?...

16

I,1,238

James Gurney, wilt thou give us leave awhile?

17

I,1,240

Philip! sparrow: James,
There's toys abroad: anon I'll tell thee more....

18

I,1,254

Knight, knight, good mother, Basilisco-like.
What! I am dubb'd! I have it on my shoulder....

19

I,1,262

As faithfully as I deny the devil.

20

I,1,269

Now, by this light, were I to get again,
Madam, I would not wish a better father....

21

II,1,429

Hear the crier.

22

II,1,431

One that will play the devil, sir, with you,
An a' may catch your hide and you alone:...

23

II,1,439

It lies as sightly on the back of him
As great Alcides' shows upon an ass:...

24

II,1,577

Bastards, and else.

25

II,1,580

Some bastards too.

26

II,1,589

Saint George, that swinged the dragon, and e'er since
Sits on his horseback at mine hostess' door,...

27

II,1,598

O tremble, for you hear the lion roar.

28

II,1,601

Speed then, to take advantage of the field.

29

II,1,660

Ha, majesty! how high thy glory towers,
When the rich blood of kings is set on fire!...

30

II,1,683

By heaven, these scroyles of Angiers flout you, kings,
And stand securely on their battlements,...

31

II,1,711

An if thou hast the mettle of a king,
Being wronged as we are by this peevish town,...

32

II,1,724

O prudent discipline! From north to south:
Austria and France shoot in each other's mouth:...

33

II,1,767

Here's a stay
That shakes the rotten carcass of old Death...

34

II,1,817

Drawn in the flattering table of her eye!
Hang'd in the frowning wrinkle of her brow!...

35

II,1,876

Mad world! mad kings! mad composition!
John, to stop Arthur's title in the whole,...

36

III,1,1052

And hang a calf's-skin on those recreant limbs.

37

III,1,1054

And hang a calf's-skin on those recreant limbs.

38

III,1,1122

And hang a calf's-skin on his recreant limbs.

39

III,1,1124

Your breeches best may carry them.

40

III,1,1145

Hang nothing but a calf's-skin, most sweet lout.

41

III,1,1224

Will't not be?
Will not a calfs-skin stop that mouth of thine?

42

III,1,1252

Old Time the clock-setter, that bald sexton Time,
Is it as he will? well then, France shall rue.

43

III,2,1280

Now, by my life, this day grows wondrous hot;
Some airy devil hovers in the sky...

44

III,2,1288

My lord, I rescued her;
Her highness is in safety, fear you not:...

45

III,3,1311

Bell, book, and candle shall not drive me back,
When gold and silver becks me to come on....

46

IV,2,1870

But if you be afeard to hear the worst,
Then let the worst unheard fall on your bead.

47

IV,2,1876

How I have sped among the clergymen,
The sums I have collected shall express....

48

IV,2,1898

The French, my lord; men's mouths are full of it:
Besides, I met Lord Bigot and Lord Salisbury,...

49

IV,2,1908

I will seek them out.

50

IV,2,1915

The spirit of the time shall teach me speed.

51

IV,3,2040

Once more to-day well met, distemper'd lords!
The king by me requests your presence straight.

52

IV,3,2047

Whate'er you think, good words, I think, were best.

53

IV,3,2049

But there is little reason in your grief;
Therefore 'twere reason you had manners now.

54

IV,3,2052

'Tis true, to hurt his master, no man else.

55

IV,3,2077

It is a damned and a bloody work;
The graceless action of a heavy hand,...

56

IV,3,2102

Your sword is bright, sir; put it up again.

57

IV,3,2118

Keep the peace, I say.

58

IV,3,2120

Thou wert better gall the devil, Salisbury:
If thou but frown on me, or stir thy foot,...

59

IV,3,2143

Here's a good world! Knew you of this fair work?
Beyond the infinite and boundless reach...

60

IV,3,2148

Ha! I'll tell thee what;
Thou'rt damn'd as black—nay, nothing is so black;...

61

IV,3,2154

If thou didst but consent
To this most cruel act, do but despair;...

62

IV,3,2169

Go, bear him in thine arms.
I am amazed, methinks, and lose my way...

63

V,1,2225

All Kent hath yielded; nothing there holds out
But Dover castle: London hath received,...

64

V,1,2234

They found him dead and cast into the streets,
An empty casket, where the jewel of life...

65

V,1,2238

So, on my soul, he did, for aught he knew.
But wherefore do you droop? why look you sad?...

66

V,1,2261

O inglorious league!
Shall we, upon the footing of our land,...

67

V,1,2274

Away, then, with good courage! yet, I know,
Our party may well meet a prouder foe.

68

V,2,2400

According to the fair play of the world,
Let me have audience; I am sent to speak:...

69

V,2,2409

By all the blood that ever fury breathed,
The youth says well. Now hear our English king;...

70

V,2,2446

No, I will speak.

71

V,2,2450

Indeed your drums, being beaten, will cry out;
And so shall you, being beaten: do but start...

72

V,2,2464

And thou shalt find it, Dauphin, do not doubt.

73

V,6,2579

A friend. What art thou?

74

V,6,2581

Whither dost thou go?

75

V,6,2584

Hubert, I think?

76

V,6,2589

Who thou wilt: and if thou please,
Thou mayst befriend me so much as to think...

77

V,6,2596

Come, come; sans compliment, what news abroad?

78

V,6,2599

Brief, then; and what's the news?

79

V,6,2602

Show me the very wound of this ill news:
I am no woman, I'll not swoon at it.

80

V,6,2609

How did he take it? who did taste to him?

81

V,6,2613

Who didst thou leave to tend his majesty?

82

V,6,2618

Withhold thine indignation, mighty heaven,
And tempt us not to bear above our power!...

83

V,7,2684

O, I am scalded with my violent motion,
And spleen of speed to see your majesty!

84

V,7,2694

The Dauphin is preparing hitherward,
Where heaven He knows how we shall answer him;...

85

V,7,2706

Art thou gone so? I do but stay behind
To do the office for thee of revenge,...

86

V,7,2723

He will the rather do it when he sees
Ourselves well sinewed to our defence.

87

V,7,2732

Let it be so: and you, my noble prince,
With other princes that may best be spared,...

88

V,7,2737

Thither shall it then:
And happily may your sweet self put on...

89

V,7,2747

O, let us pay the time but needful woe,
Since it hath been beforehand with our griefs....

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