Speeches (Lines) for Paris
in "Troilus and Cressida"

Total: 27

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,2,1127

Else might the world convince of levity
As well my undertakings as your counsels:...

2

II,2,1144

Sir, I propose not merely to myself
The pleasures such a beauty brings with it;...

3

III,1,1542

You have broke it, cousin: and, by my life, you
shall make it whole again; you shall piece it out...

4

III,1,1549

Well said, my lord! well, you say so in fits.

5

III,1,1570

What exploit's in hand? where sups he to-night?

6

III,1,1574

I'll lay my life, with my disposer Cressida.

7

III,1,1577

Well, I'll make excuse.

8

III,1,1580

I spy.

9

III,1,1597

Ay, good now, love, love, nothing but love.

10

III,1,1614

He eats nothing but doves, love, and that breeds hot
blood, and hot blood begets hot thoughts, and hot...

11

III,1,1621

Hector, Deiphobus, Helenus, Antenor, and all the
gallantry of Troy: I would fain have armed to-day,...

12

III,1,1628

To a hair.

13

III,1,1634

They're come from field: let us to Priam's hall,
To greet the warriors. Sweet Helen, I must woo you...

14

III,1,1645

Sweet, above thought I love thee.

15

IV,1,2199

See, ho! who is that there?

16

IV,1,2206

A valiant Greek, AEneas,—take his hand,—
Witness the process of your speech, wherein...

17

IV,1,2232

This is the most despiteful gentle greeting,
The noblest hateful love, that e'er I heard of....

18

IV,1,2236

His purpose meets you: 'twas to bring this Greek
To Calchas' house, and there to render him,...

19

IV,1,2249

There is no help;
The bitter disposition of the time...

20

IV,1,2254

And tell me, noble Diomed, faith, tell me true,
Even in the soul of sound good-fellowship,...

21

IV,1,2271

You are too bitter to your countrywoman.

22

IV,1,2279

Fair Diomed, you do as chapmen do,
Dispraise the thing that you desire to buy:...

23

IV,3,2411

It is great morning, and the hour prefix'd
Of her delivery to this valiant Greek...

24

IV,3,2422

I know what 'tis to love;
And would, as I shall pity, I could help!...

25

IV,4,2534

[Within] Brother Troilus!

26

IV,4,2582

Hark! Hector's trumpet.

27

IV,4,2586

'Tis Troilus' fault: come, come, to field with him.

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