Speeches (Lines) for Pandarus
in "Troilus and Cressida"

Total: 153

---
# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,38

Will this gear ne'er be mended?

2

I,1,45

Well, I have told you enough of this: for my part,
I'll not meddle nor make no further. He that will...

3

I,1,49

Ay, the grinding; but you must tarry
the bolting.

4

I,1,52

Ay, the bolting, but you must tarry the leavening.

5

I,1,54

Ay, to the leavening; but here's yet in the word
'hereafter' the kneading, the making of the cake, the...

6

I,1,63

Well, she looked yesternight fairer than ever I saw
her look, or any woman else.

7

I,1,72

An her hair were not somewhat darker than Helen's—
well, go to—there were no more comparison between...

8

I,1,94

I speak no more than truth.

9

I,1,96

Faith, I'll not meddle in't. Let her be as she is:
if she be fair, 'tis the better for her; an she be...

10

I,1,100

I have had my labour for my travail; ill-thought on of
her and ill-thought on of you; gone between and...

11

I,1,104

Because she's kin to me, therefore she's not so fair
as Helen: an she were not kin to me, she would be as...

12

I,1,109

I do not care whether you do or no. She's a fool to
stay behind her father; let her to the Greeks; and so...

13

I,1,114

Not I.

14

I,1,116

Pray you, speak no more to me: I will leave all as I
found it, and there an end.

15

I,2,196

What's that? what's that?

16

I,2,198

Good morrow, cousin Cressid: what do you talk of?
Good morrow, Alexander. How do you, cousin? When...

17

I,2,202

What were you talking of when I came? Was Hector
armed and gone ere ye came to Ilium? Helen was not...

18

I,2,206

Even so: Hector was stirring early.

19

I,2,208

Was he angry?

20

I,2,210

True, he was so: I know the cause too: he'll lay
about him to-day, I can tell them that: and there's...

21

I,2,215

Who, Troilus? Troilus is the better man of the two.

22

I,2,217

What, not between Troilus and Hector? Do you know a
man if you see him?

23

I,2,220

Well, I say Troilus is Troilus.

24

I,2,222

No, nor Hector is not Troilus in some degrees.

25

I,2,224

Himself! Alas, poor Troilus! I would he were.

26

I,2,226

Condition, I had gone barefoot to India.

27

I,2,228

Himself! no, he's not himself: would a' were
himself! Well, the gods are above; time must friend...

28

I,2,233

He is elder.

29

I,2,235

Th' other's not come to't; you shall tell me another
tale, when th' other's come to't. Hector shall not...

30

I,2,239

Nor his qualities.

31

I,2,241

Nor his beauty.

32

I,2,243

You have no judgment, niece: Helen
herself swore th' other day, that Troilus, for...

33

I,2,248

'Faith, to say truth, brown and not brown.

34

I,2,250

She praised his complexion above Paris.

35

I,2,252

So he has.

36

I,2,259

I swear to you. I think Helen loves him better than Paris.

37

I,2,261

Nay, I am sure she does. She came to him th' other
day into the compassed window,—and, you know, he...

38

I,2,266

Why, he is very young: and yet will he, within
three pound, lift as much as his brother Hector.

39

I,2,269

But to prove to you that Helen loves him: she came
and puts me her white hand to his cloven chin—

40

I,2,272

Why, you know 'tis dimpled: I think his smiling
becomes him better than any man in all Phrygia.

41

I,2,275

Does he not?

42

I,2,277

Why, go to, then: but to prove to you that Helen
loves Troilus,—

43

I,2,281

Troilus! why, he esteems her no more than I esteem
an addle egg.

44

I,2,285

I cannot choose but laugh, to think how she tickled
his chin: indeed, she has a marvellous white hand, I...

45

I,2,289

And she takes upon her to spy a white hair on his chin.

46

I,2,291

But there was such laughing! Queen Hecuba laughed
that her eyes ran o'er.

47

I,2,294

And Cassandra laughed.

48

I,2,297

And Hector laughed.

49

I,2,299

Marry, at the white hair that Helen spied on Troilus' chin.

50

I,2,302

They laughed not so much at the hair as at his pretty answer.

51

I,2,304

Quoth she, 'Here's but two and fifty hairs on your
chin, and one of them is white.

52

I,2,307

That's true; make no question of that. 'Two and
fifty hairs' quoth he, 'and one white: that white...

53

I,2,316

Well, cousin. I told you a thing yesterday; think on't.

54

I,2,318

I'll be sworn 'tis true; he will weep you, an 'twere
a man born in April.

55

I,2,323

Hark! they are coming from the field: shall we
stand up here, and see them as they pass toward...

56

I,2,327

Here, here, here's an excellent place; here we may
see most bravely: I'll tell you them all by their...

57

I,2,332

That's AEneas: is not that a brave man? he's one of
the flowers of Troy, I can tell you: but mark...

58

I,2,337

That's Antenor: he has a shrewd wit, I can tell you;
and he's a man good enough, he's one o' the soundest...

59

I,2,343

You shall see.

60

I,2,346

That's Hector, that, that, look you, that; there's a
fellow! Go thy way, Hector! There's a brave man,...

61

I,2,351

Is a' not? it does a man's heart good. Look you
what hacks are on his helmet! look you yonder, do...

62

I,2,357

Swords! any thing, he cares not; an the devil come
to him, it's all one: by God's lid, it does one's...

63

I,2,368

That's Helenus. I marvel where Troilus is. That's
Helenus. I think he went not forth to-day. That's Helenus.

64

I,2,371

Helenus? no. Yes, he'll fight indifferent well. I
marvel where Troilus is. Hark! do you not hear the...

65

I,2,376

Where? yonder? that's Deiphobus. 'Tis Troilus!
there's a man, niece! Hem! Brave Troilus! the...

66

I,2,380

Mark him; note him. O brave Troilus! Look well upon
him, niece: look you how his sword is bloodied, and...

67

I,2,391

Asses, fools, dolts! chaff and bran, chaff and bran!
porridge after meat! I could live and die i' the...

68

I,2,398

Achilles! a drayman, a porter, a very camel.

69

I,2,400

'Well, well!' why, have you any discretion? have
you any eyes? Do you know what a man is? Is not...

70

I,2,407

You are such a woman! one knows not at what ward you
lie.

71

I,2,414

Say one of your watches.

72

I,2,420

You are such another!

73

I,2,423

Where?

74

I,2,425

Good boy, tell him I come.
[Exit boy]...

75

I,2,429

I'll be with you, niece, by and by.

76

I,2,431

Ay, a token from Troilus.

77

III,1,1493

Friend, you! pray you, a word: do not you follow
the young Lord Paris?

78

III,1,1496

You depend upon him, I mean?

79

III,1,1498

You depend upon a noble gentleman; I must needs
praise him.

80

III,1,1501

You know me, do you not?

81

III,1,1503

Friend, know me better; I am the Lord Pandarus.

82

III,1,1505

I do desire it.

83

III,1,1507

Grace! not so, friend: honour and lordship are my titles.
[Music within]...

84

III,1,1511

Know you the musicians?

85

III,1,1513

Who play they to?

86

III,1,1515

At whose pleasure, friend

87

III,1,1517

Command, I mean, friend.

88

III,1,1519

Friend, we understand not one another: I am too
courtly and thou art too cunning. At whose request...

89

III,1,1526

Who, my cousin Cressida?

90

III,1,1529

It should seem, fellow, that thou hast not seen the
Lady Cressida. I come to speak with Paris from the...

91

III,1,1535

Fair be to you, my lord, and to all this fair
company! fair desires, in all fair measure,...

92

III,1,1540

You speak your fair pleasure, sweet queen. Fair
prince, here is good broken music.

93

III,1,1546

Truly, lady, no.

94

III,1,1548

Rude, in sooth; in good sooth, very rude.

95

III,1,1550

I have business to my lord, dear queen. My lord,
will you vouchsafe me a word?

96

III,1,1554

Well, sweet queen. you are pleasant with me. But,
marry, thus, my lord: my dear lord and most esteemed...

97

III,1,1558

Go to, sweet queen, to go:—commends himself most
affectionately to you,—

98

III,1,1562

Sweet queen, sweet queen! that's a sweet queen, i' faith.

99

III,1,1564

Nay, that shall not serve your turn; that shall not,
in truth, la. Nay, I care not for such words; no,...

100

III,1,1569

What says my sweet queen, my very very sweet queen?

101

III,1,1572

What says my sweet queen? My cousin will fall out
with you. You must not know where he sups.

102

III,1,1575

No, no, no such matter; you are wide: come, your
disposer is sick.

103

III,1,1578

Ay, good my lord. Why should you say Cressida? no,
your poor disposer's sick.

104

III,1,1581

You spy! what do you spy? Come, give me an
instrument. Now, sweet queen.

105

III,1,1584

My niece is horribly in love with a thing you have,
sweet queen.

106

III,1,1587

He! no, she'll none of him; they two are twain.

107

III,1,1589

Come, come, I'll hear no more of this; I'll sing
you a song now.

108

III,1,1593

Ay, you may, you may.

109

III,1,1596

Love! ay, that it shall, i' faith.

110

III,1,1598

In good troth, it begins so.
[Sings]...

111

III,1,1617

Is this the generation of love? hot blood, hot
thoughts, and hot deeds? Why, they are vipers:...

112

III,1,1626

Not I, honey-sweet queen. I long to hear how they
sped to-day. You'll remember your brother's excuse?

113

III,1,1629

Farewell, sweet queen.

114

III,1,1631

I will, sweet queen.

115

III,2,1648

How now! where's thy master? at my cousin
Cressida's?

116

III,2,1651

O, here he comes.
[Enter TROILUS]...

117

III,2,1656

Have you seen my cousin?

118

III,2,1665

Walk here i' the orchard, I'll bring her straight.

119

III,2,1680

She's making her ready, she'll come straight: you
must be witty now. She does so blush, and fetches...

120

III,2,1693

Come, come, what need you blush? shame's a baby.
Here she is now: swear the oaths now to her that...

121

III,2,1708

Words pay no debts, give her deeds: but she'll
bereave you o' the deeds too, if she call your...

122

III,2,1752

What, blushing still? have you not done talking yet?

123

III,2,1754

I thank you for that: if my lord get a boy of you,
you'll give him me. Be true to my lord: if he...

124

III,2,1759

Nay, I'll give my word for her too: our kindred,
though they be long ere they are wooed, they are...

125

III,2,1785

Pretty, i' faith.

126

III,2,1791

Leave! an you take leave till to-morrow morning,—

127

III,2,1848

Go to, a bargain made: seal it, seal it; I'll be the
witness. Here I hold your hand, here my cousin's....

128

III,2,1858

Amen. Whereupon I will show you a chamber with a
bed; which bed, because it shall not speak of your...

129

IV,2,2310

[Within] What, 's all the doors open here?

130

IV,2,2315

How now, how now! how go maidenheads? Here, you
maid! where's my cousin Cressid?

131

IV,2,2319

To do what? to do what? let her say
what: what have I brought you to do?

132

IV,2,2323

Ha! ha! Alas, poor wretch! ah, poor capocchia!
hast not slept to-night? would he not, a naughty...

133

IV,2,2337

Who's there? what's the matter? will you beat
down the door? How now! what's the matter?

134

IV,2,2341

Who's there? my Lord AEneas! By my troth,
I knew you not: what news with you so early?

135

IV,2,2344

Here! what should he do here?

136

IV,2,2347

Is he here, say you? 'tis more than I know, I'll
be sworn: for my own part, I came in late. What...

137

IV,2,2373

Is't possible? no sooner got but lost? The devil
take Antenor! the young prince will go mad: a...

138

IV,2,2378

Ah, ah!

139

IV,2,2381

Would I were as deep under the earth as I am above!

140

IV,2,2383

Prithee, get thee in: would thou hadst ne'er been
born! I knew thou wouldst be his death. O, poor...

141

IV,2,2388

Thou must be gone, wench, thou must be gone; thou
art changed for Antenor: thou must to thy father,...

142

IV,2,2393

Thou must.

143

IV,2,2404

Do, do.

144

IV,4,2427

Be moderate, be moderate.

145

IV,4,2437

Here, here, here he comes.
[Enter TROILUS]...

146

IV,4,2442

What a pair of spectacles is here!
Let me embrace too. 'O heart,' as the goodly saying is,...

147

IV,4,2457

Ay, ay, ay, ay; 'tis too plain a case.

148

IV,4,2483

Where are my tears? rain, to lay this wind, or
my heart will be blown up by the root.

149

V,3,3391

Do you hear, my lord? do you hear?

150

V,3,3393

Here's a letter come from yond poor girl.

151

V,3,3395

A whoreson tisick, a whoreson rascally tisick so
troubles me, and the foolish fortune of this girl;...

152

V,10,3668

But hear you, hear you!

153

V,10,3672

A goodly medicine for my aching bones! O world!
world! world! thus is the poor agent despised!...

Return to the "Troilus and Cressida" menu

Plays + Sonnets + Poems + Concordance + Character Search + Advanced Search + About OSS