Speeches (Lines) for Parolles
in "All's Well That Ends Well"

Total: 141

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,109

Save you, fair queen!

2

I,1,111

No.

3

I,1,113

Are you meditating on virginity?

4

I,1,117

Keep him out.

5

I,1,121

There is none: man, sitting down before you, will
undermine you and blow you up.

6

I,1,126

Virginity being blown down, man will quicklier be
blown up: marry, in blowing him down again, with...

7

I,1,137

There's little can be said in 't; 'tis against the
rule of nature. To speak on the part of virginity,...

8

I,1,153

Let me see: marry, ill, to like him that ne'er it
likes. 'Tis a commodity will lose the gloss with...

9

I,1,179

What one, i' faith?

10

I,1,181

What's pity?

11

I,1,191

Little Helen, farewell; if I can remember thee, I
will think of thee at court.

12

I,1,194

Under Mars, I.

13

I,1,196

Why under Mars?

14

I,1,199

When he was predominant.

15

I,1,201

Why think you so?

16

I,1,203

That's for advantage.

17

I,1,207

I am so full of businesses, I cannot answer thee
acutely. I will return perfect courtier; in the...

18

II,1,620

'Tis not his fault, the spark.

19

II,1,622

Most admirable: I have seen those wars.

20

II,1,625

An thy mind stand to't, boy, steal away bravely.

21

II,1,631

Commit it, count.

22

II,1,636

Noble heroes, my sword and yours are kin. Good
sparks and lustrous, a word, good metals: you shall...

23

II,1,645

Mars dote on you for his novices! what will ye do?

24

II,1,648

[To BERTRAM] Use a more spacious ceremony to the
noble lords; you have restrained yourself within the...

25

II,1,657

Worthy fellows; and like to prove most sinewy sword-men.

26

II,3,897

Why, 'tis the rarest argument of wonder that hath
shot out in our latter times.

27

II,3,901

So I say.

28

II,3,903

So I say.

29

II,3,905

Right; so I say.

30

II,3,907

Why, there 'tis; so say I too.

31

II,3,909

Right; as 'twere, a man assured of a—

32

II,3,911

Just, you say well; so would I have said.

33

II,3,913

It is, indeed: if you will have it in showing, you
shall read it in—what do you call there?

34

II,3,916

That's it; I would have said the very same.

35

II,3,919

Nay, 'tis strange, 'tis very strange, that is the
brief and the tedious of it; and he's of a most...

36

II,3,923

Ay, so I say.

37

II,3,932

I would have said it; you say well. Here comes the king.
[Enter KING, HELENA, and Attendants. LAFEU and]...

38

II,3,938

Mort du vinaigre! is not this Helen?

39

II,3,1089

Your pleasure, sir?

40

II,3,1092

Recantation! My lord! my master!

41

II,3,1094

A most harsh one, and not to be understood without
bloody succeeding. My master!

42

II,3,1097

To any count, to all counts, to what is man.

43

II,3,1100

You are too old, sir; let it satisfy you, you are too old.

44

II,3,1103

What I dare too well do, I dare not do.

45

II,3,1112

Hadst thou not the privilege of antiquity upon thee,—

46

II,3,1118

My lord, you give me most egregious indignity.

47

II,3,1120

I have not, my lord, deserved it.

48

II,3,1123

Well, I shall be wiser.

49

II,3,1130

My lord, you do me most insupportable vexation.

50

II,3,1135

Well, thou hast a son shall take this disgrace off
me; scurvy, old, filthy, scurvy lord! Well, I must...

51

II,3,1145

I most unfeignedly beseech your lordship to make
some reservation of your wrongs: he is my good...

52

II,3,1149

Ay, sir.

53

II,3,1158

This is hard and undeserved measure, my lord.

54

II,3,1166

Good, very good; it is so then: good, very good;
let it be concealed awhile.

55

II,3,1170

What's the matter, sweet-heart?

56

II,3,1173

What, what, sweet-heart?

57

II,3,1176

France is a dog-hole, and it no more merits
The tread of a man's foot: to the wars!

58

II,3,1180

Ay, that would be known. To the wars, my boy, to the wars!
He wears his honour in a box unseen,...

59

II,3,1195

Will this capriccio hold in thee? art sure?

60

II,3,1199

Why, these balls bound; there's noise in it. 'Tis hard:
A young man married is a man that's marr'd:...

61

II,4,1218

Bless you, my fortunate lady!

62

II,4,1221

You had my prayers to lead them on; and to keep them
on, have them still. O, my knave, how does my old lady?

63

II,4,1225

Why, I say nothing.

64

II,4,1231

Away! thou'rt a knave.

65

II,4,1235

Go to, thou art a witty fool; I have found thee.

66

II,4,1240

A good knave, i' faith, and well fed.
Madam, my lord will go away to-night;...

67

II,4,1251

That you will take your instant leave o' the king
And make this haste as your own good proceeding,...

68

II,4,1256

That, having this obtain'd, you presently
Attend his further pleasure.

69

II,4,1259

I shall report it so.

70

II,5,1278

[To BERTRAM] These things shall be done, sir.

71

II,5,1280

Sir?

72

II,5,1284

She is.

73

II,5,1286

As you'll have her.

74

II,5,1296

I know not how I have deserved to run into my lord's
displeasure.

75

II,5,1312

An idle lord. I swear.

76

II,5,1314

Why, do you not know him?

77

II,5,1365

Bravely, coragio!

78

III,5,1711

Lose our drum! well.

79

III,6,1773

'But a drum'! is't 'but a drum'? A drum so lost!
There was excellent command,—to charge in with our...

80

III,6,1783

It might have been recovered.

81

III,6,1785

It is to be recovered: but that the merit of
service is seldom attributed to the true and exact...

82

III,6,1798

By the hand of a soldier, I will undertake it.

83

III,6,1800

I'll about it this evening: and I will presently
pen down my dilemmas, encourage myself in my...

84

III,6,1805

I know not what the success will be, my lord; but
the attempt I vow.

85

III,6,1809

I love not many words.

86

IV,1,1926

Ten o'clock: within these three hours 'twill be
time enough to go home. What shall I say I have...

87

IV,1,1936

What the devil should move me to undertake the
recovery of this drum, being not ignorant of the...

88

IV,1,1948

I would the cutting of my garments would serve the
turn, or the breaking of my Spanish sword.

89

IV,1,1951

Or the baring of my beard; and to say it was in
stratagem.

90

IV,1,1954

Or to drown my clothes, and say I was stripped.

91

IV,1,1956

Though I swore I leaped from the window of the citadel.

92

IV,1,1958

Thirty fathom.

93

IV,1,1960

I would I had any drum of the enemy's: I would swear
I recovered it.

94

IV,1,1963

A drum now of the enemy's,—

95

IV,1,1967

O, ransom, ransom! do not hide mine eyes.

96

IV,1,1970

I know you are the Muskos' regiment:
And I shall lose my life for want of language;...

97

IV,1,1978

O!

98

IV,1,1985

O, let me live!
And all the secrets of our camp I'll show,...

99

IV,1,1990

If I do not, damn me.

100

IV,3,2211

I will confess what I know without constraint: if
ye pinch me like a pasty, I can say no more.

101

IV,3,2217

And truly, as I hope to live.

102

IV,3,2220

Five or six thousand; but very weak and
unserviceable: the troops are all scattered, and...

103

IV,3,2225

Do: I'll take the sacrament on't, how and which way you will.

104

IV,3,2236

Five or six thousand horse, I said,— I will say
true,—or thereabouts, set down, for I'll speak truth.

105

IV,3,2241

Poor rogues, I pray you, say.

106

IV,3,2243

I humbly thank you, sir: a truth's a truth, the
rogues are marvellous poor.

107

IV,3,2247

By my troth, sir, if I were to live this present
hour, I will tell true. Let me see: Spurio, a...

108

IV,3,2269

I beseech you, let me answer to the particular of
the inter'gatories: demand them singly.

109

IV,3,2272

I know him: a' was a botcher's 'prentice in Paris,
from whence he was whipped for getting the shrieve's...

110

IV,3,2279

Upon my knowledge, he is, and lousy.

111

IV,3,2283

The duke knows him for no other but a poor officer
of mine; and writ to me this other day to turn him...

112

IV,3,2287

In good sadness, I do not know; either it is there,
or it is upon a file with the duke's other letters...

113

IV,3,2291

I do not know if it be it or no.

114

IV,3,2295

That is not the duke's letter, sir; that is an
advertisement to a proper maid in Florence, one...

115

IV,3,2301

My meaning in't, I protest, was very honest in the
behalf of the maid; for I knew the young count to be...

116

IV,3,2324

My life, sir, in any case: not that I am afraid to
die; but that, my offences being many, I would...

117

IV,3,2332

He will steal, sir, an egg out of a cloister: for
rapes and ravishments he parallels Nessus: he...

118

IV,3,2348

Faith, sir, he has led the drum before the English
tragedians; to belie him, I will not, and more of...

119

IV,3,2360

Sir, for a quart d'ecu he will sell the fee-simple
of his salvation, the inheritance of it; and cut the...

120

IV,3,2367

E'en a crow o' the same nest; not altogether so
great as the first in goodness, but greater a great...

121

IV,3,2375

Ay, and the captain of his horse, Count Rousillon.

122

IV,3,2377

[Aside] I'll no more drumming; a plague of all
drums! Only to seem to deserve well, and to...

123

IV,3,2388

O Lord, sir, let me live, or let me see my death!

124

IV,3,2404

Who cannot be crushed with a plot?

125

IV,3,2410

Yet am I thankful: if my heart were great,
'Twould burst at this. Captain I'll be no more;...

126

V,2,2613

Good Monsieur Lavache, give my Lord Lafeu this
letter: I have ere now, sir, been better known to...

127

V,2,2623

Nay, you need not to stop your nose, sir; I spake
but by a metaphor.

128

V,2,2628

Pray you, sir, deliver me this paper.

129

V,2,2642

My lord, I am a man whom fortune hath cruelly
scratched.

130

V,2,2651

I beseech your honour to hear me one single word.

131

V,2,2654

My name, my good lord, is Parolles.

132

V,2,2657

O my good lord, you were the first that found me!

133

V,2,2659

It lies in you, my lord, to bring me in some grace,
for you did bring me out.

134

V,2,2669

I praise God for you.

135

V,3,2952

So please your majesty, my master hath been an
honourable gentleman: tricks he hath had in him,...

136

V,3,2956

Faith, sir, he did love her; but how?

137

V,3,2958

He did love her, sir, as a gentleman loves a woman.

138

V,3,2960

He loved her, sir, and loved her not.

139

V,3,2963

I am a poor man, and at your majesty's command.

140

V,3,2966

Faith, I know more than I'll speak.

141

V,3,2968

Yes, so please your majesty. I did go between them,
as I said; but more than that, he loved her: for...

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