Speeches (Lines) for Old Gobbo
in "Merchant of Venice"

Total: 19

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,2,598

Master young man, you, I pray you, which is the way
to master Jew's?

2

II,2,603

Master young gentleman, I pray you, which is the way
to master Jew's?

3

II,2,609

By God's sonties, 'twill be a hard way to hit. Can
you tell me whether one Launcelot,
that dwells with him, dwell with him or no?

4

II,2,616

No master, sir, but a poor man's son: his father,
though I say it, is an honest exceeding poor man
and, God be thanked, well to live.

5

II,2,621

Your worship's friend and Launcelot, sir.

6

II,2,624

Of Launcelot, an't please your mastership.

7

II,2,631

Marry, God forbid! the boy was the very staff of my
age, my very prop.

8

II,2,635

Alack the day, I know you not, young gentleman:
but, I pray you, tell me, is my boy, God rest his
soul, alive or dead?

9

II,2,639

Alack, sir, I am sand-blind; I know you not.

10

II,2,646

Pray you, sir, stand up: I am sure you are not
Launcelot, my boy.

11

II,2,652

I cannot think you are my son.

12

II,2,656

Her name is Margery, indeed: I'll be sworn, if thou
be Launcelot, thou art mine own flesh and blood.
Lord worshipped might he be! what a beard hast thou
got! thou hast got more hair on thy chin than
Dobbin my fill-horse has on his tail.

13

II,2,664

Lord, how art thou changed! How dost thou and thy
master agree? I have brought him a present. How
'gree you now?

14

II,2,685

God bless your worship!

15

II,2,687

Here's my son, sir, a poor boy,—

16

II,2,690

He hath a great infection, sir, as one would say, to serve—

17

II,2,693

His master and he, saving your worship's reverence,
are scarce cater-cousins—

18

II,2,698

I have here a dish of doves that I would bestow upon
your worship, and my suit is—

19

II,2,705

That is the very defect of the matter, sir.

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