Speeches (Lines) for Olivia
in "Twelfth Night"

Total: 118

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,5,330

Take the fool away.

2

I,5,332

Go to, you're a dry fool; I'll no more of you:
besides, you grow dishonest.

3

I,5,346

Sir, I bade them take away you.

4

I,5,351

Can you do it?

5

I,5,353

Make your proof.

6

I,5,356

Well, sir, for want of other idleness, I'll bide your proof.

7

I,5,358

Good fool, for my brother's death.

8

I,5,360

I know his soul is in heaven, fool.

9

I,5,363

What think you of this fool, Malvolio? doth he not mend?

10

I,5,371

How say you to that, Malvolio?

11

I,5,380

Oh, you are sick of self-love, Malvolio, and taste
with a distempered appetite. To be generous,...

12

I,5,392

From the Count Orsino, is it?

13

I,5,394

Who of my people hold him in delay?

14

I,5,396

Fetch him off, I pray you; he speaks nothing but
madman: fie on him!...

15

I,5,409

By mine honour, half drunk. What is he at the gate, cousin?

16

I,5,411

A gentleman! what gentleman?

17

I,5,415

Cousin, cousin, how have you come so early by this lethargy?

18

I,5,417

Ay, marry, what is he?

19

I,5,421

What's a drunken man like, fool?

20

I,5,425

Go thou and seek the crowner, and let him sit o' my
coz; for he's in the third degree of drink, he's...

21

I,5,439

Tell him he shall not speak with me.

22

I,5,443

What kind o' man is he?

23

I,5,445

What manner of man?

24

I,5,447

Of what personage and years is he?

25

I,5,454

Let him approach: call in my gentlewoman.

26

I,5,458

Give me my veil: come, throw it o'er my face.
We'll once more hear Orsino's embassy.

27

I,5,462

Speak to me; I shall answer for her.
Your will?

28

I,5,471

Whence came you, sir?

29

I,5,476

Are you a comedian?

30

I,5,480

If I do not usurp myself, I am.

31

I,5,486

Come to what is important in't: I forgive you the praise.

32

I,5,488

It is the more like to be feigned: I pray you,
keep it in. I heard you were saucy at my gates,...

33

I,5,498

Sure, you have some hideous matter to deliver, when
the courtesy of it is so fearful. Speak your office.

34

I,5,503

Yet you began rudely. What are you? what would you?

35

I,5,508

Give us the place alone: we will hear this divinity.
[Exeunt MARIA and Attendants]...

36

I,5,512

A comfortable doctrine, and much may be said of it.
Where lies your text?

37

I,5,515

In his bosom! In what chapter of his bosom?

38

I,5,517

O, I have read it: it is heresy. Have you no more to say?

39

I,5,519

Have you any commission from your lord to negotiate
with my face? You are now out of your text: but...

40

I,5,526

'Tis in grain, sir; 'twill endure wind and weather.

41

I,5,532

O, sir, I will not be so hard-hearted; I will give
out divers schedules of my beauty: it shall be...

42

I,5,544

How does he love me?

43

I,5,547

Your lord does know my mind; I cannot love him:
Yet I suppose him virtuous, know him noble,...

44

I,5,558

Why, what would you?

45

I,5,568

You might do much.
What is your parentage?

46

I,5,572

Get you to your lord;
I cannot love him: let him send no more;...

47

I,5,583

'What is your parentage?'
'Above my fortunes, yet my state is well:...

48

I,5,597

Run after that same peevish messenger,
The county's man: he left this ring behind him,...

49

I,5,606

I do I know not what, and fear to find
Mine eye too great a flatterer for my mind....

50

III,1,1327

Let the garden door be shut, and leave me to my hearing.
[Exeunt SIR TOBY BELCH, SIR ANDREW, and MARIA]...

51

III,1,1331

What is your name?

52

III,1,1333

My servant, sir! 'Twas never merry world
Since lowly feigning was call'd compliment:...

53

III,1,1338

For him, I think not on him: for his thoughts,
Would they were blanks, rather than fill'd with me!

54

III,1,1342

O, by your leave, I pray you,
I bade you never speak again of him:...

55

III,1,1348

Give me leave, beseech you. I did send,
After the last enchantment you did here,...

56

III,1,1360

That's a degree to love.

57

III,1,1363

Why, then, methinks 'tis time to smile again.
O, world, how apt the poor are to be proud!...

58

III,1,1376

Stay:
I prithee, tell me what thou thinkest of me.

59

III,1,1379

If I think so, I think the same of you.

60

III,1,1381

I would you were as I would have you be!

61

III,1,1384

O, what a deal of scorn looks beautiful
In the contempt and anger of his lip!...

62

III,1,1402

Yet come again; for thou perhaps mayst move
That heart, which now abhors, to like his love.

63

III,4,1544

I have sent after him: he says he'll come;
How shall I feast him? what bestow of him?...

64

III,4,1553

Why, what's the matter? does he rave?

65

III,4,1557

Go call him hither.
[Exit MARIA]...

66

III,4,1564

Smilest thou?
I sent for thee upon a sad occasion.

67

III,4,1571

Why, how dost thou, man? what is the matter with thee?

68

III,4,1575

Wilt thou go to bed, Malvolio?

69

III,4,1577

God comfort thee! Why dost thou smile so and kiss
thy hand so oft?

70

III,4,1583

What meanest thou by that, Malvolio?

71

III,4,1585

Ha!

72

III,4,1587

What sayest thou?

73

III,4,1589

Heaven restore thee!

74

III,4,1591

Thy yellow stockings!

75

III,4,1593

Cross-gartered!

76

III,4,1595

Am I made?

77

III,4,1597

Why, this is very midsummer madness.

78

III,4,1602

I'll come to him.
[Exit Servant]...

79

III,4,1743

I have said too much unto a heart of stone
And laid mine honour too unchary out:...

80

III,4,1750

Here, wear this jewel for me, 'tis my picture;
Refuse it not; it hath no tongue to vex you;...

81

III,4,1756

How with mine honour may I give him that
Which I have given to you?

82

III,4,1759

Well, come again to-morrow: fare thee well:
A fiend like thee might bear my soul to hell.

83

IV,1,1995

Hold, Toby; on thy life I charge thee, hold!

84

IV,1,1997

Will it be ever thus? Ungracious wretch,
Fit for the mountains and the barbarous caves,...

85

IV,1,2016

Nay, come, I prithee; would thou'ldst be ruled by me!

86

IV,1,2018

O, say so, and so be!

87

IV,3,2174

Blame not this haste of mine. If you mean well,
Now go with me and with this holy man...

88

IV,3,2186

Then lead the way, good father; and heavens so shine,
That they may fairly note this act of mine!

89

V,1,2292

What would my lord, but that he may not have,
Wherein Olivia may seem serviceable?...

90

V,1,2297

What do you say, Cesario? Good my lord,—

91

V,1,2299

If it be aught to the old tune, my lord,
It is as fat and fulsome to mine ear...

92

V,1,2303

Still so constant, lord.

93

V,1,2308

Even what it please my lord, that shall become him.

94

V,1,2326

Where goes Cesario?

95

V,1,2332

Ay me, detested! how am I beguiled!

96

V,1,2334

Hast thou forgot thyself? is it so long?
Call forth the holy father.

97

V,1,2337

Whither, my lord? Cesario, husband, stay.

98

V,1,2339

Ay, husband: can he that deny?

99

V,1,2342

Alas, it is the baseness of thy fear
That makes thee strangle thy propriety:...

100

V,1,2369

O, do not swear!
Hold little faith, though thou hast too much fear.

101

V,1,2374

What's the matter?

102

V,1,2378

Who has done this, Sir Andrew?

103

V,1,2401

Away with him! Who hath made this havoc with them?

104

V,1,2405

Get him to bed, and let his hurt be look'd to.

105

V,1,2425

Most wonderful!

106

V,1,2481

He shall enlarge him: fetch Malvolio hither:
And yet, alas, now I remember me,...

107

V,1,2493

Open't, and read it.

108

V,1,2498

How now! art thou mad?

109

V,1,2501

Prithee, read i' thy right wits.

110

V,1,2504

Read it you, sirrah.

111

V,1,2516

Did he write this?

112

V,1,2519

See him deliver'd, Fabian; bring him hither.
[Exit FABIAN]...

113

V,1,2534

A sister! you are she.

114

V,1,2537

Ay, my lord, this same.
How now, Malvolio!

115

V,1,2541

Have I, Malvolio? no.

116

V,1,2557

Alas, Malvolio, this is not my writing,
Though, I confess, much like the character...

117

V,1,2582

Alas, poor fool, how have they baffled thee!

118

V,1,2592

He hath been most notoriously abused.

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