Speeches (Lines) for Nerissa
in "Merchant of Venice"

Total: 36

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,197

You would be, sweet madam, if your miseries were in
the same abundance as your good fortunes are: and...

2

I,2,205

They would be better, if well followed.

3

I,2,221

Your father was ever virtuous; and holy men at their
death have good inspirations: therefore the lottery,...

4

I,2,232

First, there is the Neapolitan prince.

5

I,2,238

Then there is the County Palatine.

6

I,2,247

How say you by the French lord, Monsieur Le Bon?

7

I,2,258

What say you, then, to Falconbridge, the young baron
of England?

8

I,2,269

What think you of the Scottish lord, his neighbour?

9

I,2,275

How like you the young German, the Duke of Saxony's nephew?

10

I,2,282

If he should offer to choose, and choose the right
casket, you should refuse to perform your father's...

11

I,2,290

You need not fear, lady, the having any of these
lords: they have acquainted me with their...

12

I,2,302

Do you not remember, lady, in your father's time, a
Venetian, a scholar and a soldier, that came hither...

13

I,2,306

True, madam: he, of all the men that ever my foolish
eyes looked upon, was the best deserving a fair lady.

14

II,9,1129

Quick, quick, I pray thee; draw the curtain straight:
The Prince of Arragon hath ta'en his oath,...

15

II,9,1215

The ancient saying is no heresy,
Hanging and wiving goes by destiny.

16

II,9,1236

Bassanio, lord Love, if thy will it be!

17

III,2,1556

My lord and lady, it is now our time,
That have stood by and seen our wishes prosper,...

18

III,2,1580

Madam, it is, so you stand pleased withal.

19

III,2,1585

What, and stake down?

20

III,4,1812

Shall they see us?

21

III,4,1832

Why, shall we turn to men?

22

IV,1,2054

From both, my lord. Bellario greets your grace.

23

IV,1,2081

He attendeth here hard by,
To know your answer, whether you'll admit him.

24

IV,1,2238

'Tis well you offer it behind her back;
The wish would make else an unquiet house.

25

IV,2,2431

Sir, I would speak with you.
[Aside to PORTIA]...

26

IV,2,2441

Come, good sir, will you show me to this house?

27

V,1,2549

When the moon shone, we did not see the candle.

28

V,1,2555

It is your music, madam, of the house.

29

V,1,2558

Silence bestows that virtue on it, madam.

30

V,1,2616

What talk you of the posy or the value?
You swore to me, when I did give it you,...

31

V,1,2625

Ay, if a woman live to be a man.

32

V,1,2658

Nor I in yours
Till I again see mine.

33

V,1,2702

And I his clerk; therefore be well advised
How you do leave me to mine own protection.

34

V,1,2730

And pardon me, my gentle Gratiano;
For that same scrubbed boy, the doctor's clerk,...

35

V,1,2753

Ay, but the clerk that never means to do it,
Unless he live until he be a man.

36

V,1,2762

Ay, and I'll give them him without a fee.
There do I give to you and Jessica,...

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