Speeches (Lines) for Mopsa
in "Winter's Tale"

Total: 13

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

IV,4,2050

Dorcas. Mopsa must be your mistress: marry, garlic,
To mend her kissing with!

Mopsa. Now, in good time!


2

IV,4,2124

Clown. If I were not in love with Mopsa, thou shouldst take
no money of me; but being enthralled as I am, it
will also be the bondage of certain ribbons and gloves.

Mopsa. I was promised them against the feast; but they come
not too late now.


3

IV,4,2127

Dorcas. He hath promised you more than that, or there be liars.

Mopsa. He hath paid you all he promised you; may be, he has
paid you more, which will shame you to give him again.


4

IV,4,2136

Clown. Is there no manners left among maids? will they
wear their plackets where they should bear their
faces? Is there not milking-time, when you are
going to bed, or kiln-hole, to whistle off these
secrets, but you must be tittle-tattling before all
our guests? 'tis well they are whispering: clamour
your tongues, and not a word more.

Mopsa. I have done. Come, you promised me a tawdry-lace
and a pair of sweet gloves.


5

IV,4,2145

Clown. What hast here? ballads?

Mopsa. Pray now, buy some: I love a ballad in print o'
life, for then we are sure they are true.


6

IV,4,2151

Autolycus. Here's one to a very doleful tune, how a usurer's
wife was brought to bed of twenty money-bags at a
burthen and how she longed to eat adders' heads and
toads carbonadoed.

Mopsa. Is it true, think you?


7

IV,4,2157

Autolycus. Here's the midwife's name to't, one Mistress
Tale-porter, and five or six honest wives that were
present. Why should I carry lies abroad?

Mopsa. Pray you now, buy it.


8

IV,4,2172

Autolycus. This is a merry ballad, but a very pretty one.

Mopsa. Let's have some merry ones.


9

IV,4,2177

Autolycus. Why, this is a passing merry one and goes to
the tune of 'Two maids wooing a man:' there's
scarce a maid westward but she sings it; 'tis in
request, I can tell you.

Mopsa. We can both sing it: if thou'lt bear a part, thou
shalt hear; 'tis in three parts.


10

IV,4,2186

Dorcas. Whither?

Mopsa. O, whither?


11

IV,4,2188

Dorcas. Whither?

Mopsa. It becomes thy oath full well,
Thou to me thy secrets tell.


12

IV,4,2191

Dorcas. Me too, let me go thither.

Mopsa. Or thou goest to the orange or mill.


13

IV,4,2197

Dorcas. Thou hast sworn my love to be.

Mopsa. Thou hast sworn it more to me:
Then whither goest? say, whither?


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