Speeches (Lines) for Menas
in "Antony and Cleopatra"

Total: 35

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,1,635

Pompey. I shall do well:
The people love me, and the sea is mine;
My powers are crescent, and my auguring hope
Says it will come to the full. Mark Antony
In Egypt sits at dinner, and will make
No wars without doors: Caesar gets money where
He loses hearts: Lepidus flatters both,
Of both is flatter'd; but he neither loves,
Nor either cares for him.

Menas. Caesar and Lepidus
Are in the field: a mighty strength they carry.


2

II,1,638

Pompey. Where have you this? 'tis false.

Menas. From Silvius, sir.


3

II,1,662

Pompey. I could have given less matter
A better ear. Menas, I did not think
This amorous surfeiter would have donn'd his helm
For such a petty war: his soldiership
Is twice the other twain: but let us rear
The higher our opinion, that our stirring
Can from the lap of Egypt's widow pluck
The ne'er-lust-wearied Antony.

Menas. I cannot hope
Caesar and Antony shall well greet together:
His wife that's dead did trespasses to Caesar;
His brother warr'd upon him; although, I think,
Not moved by Antony.


4

II,6,1320

(stage directions). [Exeunt all but MENAS and ENOBARBUS]

Menas. [Aside] Thy father, Pompey, would ne'er have
made this treaty.—You and I have known, sir.


5

II,6,1323

Domitius Enobarus. At sea, I think.

Menas. We have, sir.


6

II,6,1325

Domitius Enobarus. You have done well by water.

Menas. And you by land.


7

II,6,1328

Domitius Enobarus. I will praise any man that will praise me; though it
cannot be denied what I have done by land.

Menas. Nor what I have done by water.


8

II,6,1331

Domitius Enobarus. Yes, something you can deny for your own
safety: you have been a great thief by sea.

Menas. And you by land.


9

II,6,1335

Domitius Enobarus. There I deny my land service. But give me your
hand, Menas: if our eyes had authority, here they
might take two thieves kissing.

Menas. All men's faces are true, whatsome'er their hands are.


10

II,6,1337

Domitius Enobarus. But there is never a fair woman has a true face.

Menas. No slander; they steal hearts.


11

II,6,1339

Domitius Enobarus. We came hither to fight with you.

Menas. For my part, I am sorry it is turned to a drinking.
Pompey doth this day laugh away his fortune.


12

II,6,1342

Domitius Enobarus. If he do, sure, he cannot weep't back again.

Menas. You've said, sir. We looked not for Mark Antony
here: pray you, is he married to Cleopatra?


13

II,6,1345

Domitius Enobarus. Caesar's sister is called Octavia.

Menas. True, sir; she was the wife of Caius Marcellus.


14

II,6,1347

Domitius Enobarus. But she is now the wife of Marcus Antonius.

Menas. Pray ye, sir?


15

II,6,1349

Domitius Enobarus. 'Tis true.

Menas. Then is Caesar and he for ever knit together.


16

II,6,1352

Domitius Enobarus. If I were bound to divine of this unity, I would
not prophesy so.

Menas. I think the policy of that purpose made more in the
marriage than the love of the parties.


17

II,6,1358

Domitius Enobarus. I think so too. But you shall find, the band that
seems to tie their friendship together will be the
very strangler of their amity: Octavia is of a
holy, cold, and still conversation.

Menas. Who would not have his wife so?


18

II,6,1366

Domitius Enobarus. Not he that himself is not so; which is Mark Antony.
He will to his Egyptian dish again: then shall the
sighs of Octavia blow the fire up in Caesar; and, as
I said before, that which is the strength of their
amity shall prove the immediate author of their
variance. Antony will use his affection where it is:
he married but his occasion here.

Menas. And thus it may be. Come, sir, will you aboard?
I have a health for you.


19

II,6,1369

Domitius Enobarus. I shall take it, sir: we have used our throats in Egypt.

Menas. Come, let's away.


20

II,7,1411

Lepidus. Nay, certainly, I have heard the Ptolemies'
pyramises are very goodly things; without
contradiction, I have heard that.

Menas. [Aside to POMPEY] Pompey, a word.


21

II,7,1414

Pompey. [Aside to MENAS] Say in mine ear:
what is't?

Menas. [Aside to POMPEY] Forsake thy seat, I do beseech
thee, captain,
And hear me speak a word.


22

II,7,1435

Pompey. [Aside to MENAS] Go hang, sir, hang! Tell me of
that? away!
Do as I bid you. Where's this cup I call'd for?

Menas. [Aside to POMPEY] If for the sake of merit thou
wilt hear me,
Rise from thy stool.


23

II,7,1441

(stage directions). [Rises, and walks aside]

Menas. I have ever held my cap off to thy fortunes.


24

II,7,1446

Antony. These quick-sands, Lepidus,
Keep off them, for you sink.

Menas. Wilt thou be lord of all the world?


25

II,7,1448

Pompey. What say'st thou?

Menas. Wilt thou be lord of the whole world? That's twice.


26

II,7,1450

Pompey. How should that be?

Menas. But entertain it,
And, though thou think me poor, I am the man
Will give thee all the world.


27

II,7,1454

Pompey. Hast thou drunk well?

Menas. Now, Pompey, I have kept me from the cup.
Thou art, if thou darest be, the earthly Jove:
Whate'er the ocean pales, or sky inclips,
Is thine, if thou wilt ha't.


28

II,7,1459

Pompey. Show me which way.

Menas. These three world-sharers, these competitors,
Are in thy vessel: let me cut the cable;
And, when we are put off, fall to their throats:
All there is thine.


29

II,7,1471

Pompey. Ah, this thou shouldst have done,
And not have spoke on't! In me 'tis villany;
In thee't had been good service. Thou must know,
'Tis not my profit that does lead mine honour;
Mine honour, it. Repent that e'er thy tongue
Hath so betray'd thine act: being done unknown,
I should have found it afterwards well done;
But must condemn it now. Desist, and drink.

Menas. [Aside] For this,
I'll never follow thy pall'd fortunes more.
Who seeks, and will not take when once 'tis offer'd,
Shall never find it more.


30

II,7,1478

Domitius Enobarus. Here's to thee, Menas!

Menas. Enobarbus, welcome!


31

II,7,1482

(stage directions). [Pointing to the Attendant who carries off LEPIDUS]

Menas. Why?


32

II,7,1485

Domitius Enobarus. A' bears the third part of the world, man; see'st
not?

Menas. The third part, then, is drunk: would it were all,
That it might go on wheels!


33

II,7,1488

Domitius Enobarus. Drink thou; increase the reels.

Menas. Come.


34

II,7,1537

Domitius Enobarus. Take heed you fall not.
[Exeunt all but DOMITIUS ENOBARBUS and MENAS]
Menas, I'll not on shore.

Menas. No, to my cabin.
These drums! these trumpets, flutes! what!
Let Neptune hear we bid a loud farewell
To these great fellows: sound and be hang'd, sound out!


35

II,7,1543

Domitius Enobarus. Ho! says a' There's my cap.

Menas. Ho! Noble captain, come.


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