Speeches (Lines) for Mariana
in "Measure for Measure"

Total: 24

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

IV,1,1801

Break off thy song, and haste thee quick away:
Here comes a man of comfort, whose advice
Hath often still'd my brawling discontent.
[Exit Boy]
[Enter DUKE VINCENTIO disguised as before]
I cry you mercy, sir; and well could wish
You had not found me here so musical:
Let me excuse me, and believe me so,
My mirth it much displeased, but pleased my woe.

2

IV,1,1815

You have not been inquired after:
I have sat here all day.

3

IV,1,1821

I am always bound to you.

4

IV,1,1855

Good friar, I know you do, and have found it.

5

IV,1,1860

Will't please you walk aside?

6

IV,1,1877

Fear me not.

7

IV,6,2368

Be ruled by him.

8

IV,6,2373

I would Friar Peter—

9

V,1,2576

Pardon, my lord; I will not show my face
Until my husband bid me.

10

V,1,2579

No, my lord.

11

V,1,2581

No, my lord.

12

V,1,2583

Neither, my lord.

13

V,1,2590

My lord; I do confess I ne'er was married;
And I confess besides I am no maid:
I have known my husband; yet my husband
Knows not that ever he knew me.

14

V,1,2598

Now I come to't my lord
She that accuses him of fornication,
In self-same manner doth accuse my husband,
And charges him my lord, with such a time
When I'll depose I had him in mine arms
With all the effect of love.

15

V,1,2605

Not that I know.

16

V,1,2607

Why, just, my lord, and that is Angelo,
Who thinks he knows that he ne'er knew my body,
But knows he thinks that he knows Isabel's.

17

V,1,2611

My husband bids me; now I will unmask.
[Unveiling]
This is that face, thou cruel Angelo,
Which once thou sworest was worth the looking on;
This is the hand which, with a vow'd contract,
Was fast belock'd in thine; this is the body
That took away the match from Isabel,
And did supply thee at thy garden-house
In her imagined person.

18

V,1,2633

Noble prince,
As there comes light from heaven and words from breath,
As there is sense in truth and truth in virtue,
I am affianced this man's wife as strongly
As words could make up vows: and, my good lord,
But Tuesday night last gone in's garden-house
He knew me as a wife. As this is true,
Let me in safety raise me from my knees
Or else for ever be confixed here,
A marble monument!

19

V,1,2843

O my most gracious lord,
I hope you will not mock me with a husband.

20

V,1,2853

O my dear lord,
I crave no other, nor no better man.

21

V,1,2856

Gentle my liege,—

22

V,1,2862

O my good lord! Sweet Isabel, take my part;
Lend me your knees, and all my life to come
I'll lend you all my life to do you service.

23

V,1,2869

Isabel,
Sweet Isabel, do yet but kneel by me;
Hold up your hands, say nothing; I'll speak all.
They say, best men are moulded out of faults;
And, for the most, become much more the better
For being a little bad: so may my husband.
O Isabel, will you not lend a knee?

24

V,1,2890

Merely, my lord.

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