Speeches (Lines) for Queen Margaret
in "Henry VI, Part II"

Total: 61

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,28

Great King of England and my gracious lord,
The mutual conference that my mind hath had,...

2

I,1,43

We thank you all.

3

I,3,401

[Reading] 'To my Lord Protector!' Are your
supplications to his lordship? Let me see them:...

4

I,3,416

What sayst thou? did the Duke of York say he was
rightful heir to the crown?

5

I,3,426

And as for you, that love to be protected
Under the wings of our protector's grace,...

6

I,3,433

My Lord of Suffolk, say, is this the guise,
Is this the fashion in the court of England?...

7

I,3,459

Beside the haughty protector, have we Beaufort,
The imperious churchman, Somerset, Buckingham,...

8

I,3,466

Not all these lords do vex me half so much
As that proud dame, the lord protector's wife....

9

I,3,509

Because the king, forsooth, will have it so.

10

I,3,512

If he be old enough, what needs your grace
To be protector of his excellence?

11

I,3,529

They sale of offices and towns in France,
If they were known, as the suspect is great,...

12

II,1,727

Believe me, lords, for flying at the brook,
I saw not better sport these seven years' day:...

13

II,1,759

And thy ambition, Gloucester.

14

II,1,828

Tell me, good fellow, camest thou here by chance,
Or of devotion, to this holy shrine?

15

II,1,901

It made me laugh to see the villain run.

16

II,1,936

Gloucester, see here the tainture of thy nest.
And look thyself be faultless, thou wert best.

17

II,3,1072

I see no reason why a king of years
Should be to be protected like a child....

18

II,3,1084

Why, now is Henry king, and Margaret queen;
And Humphrey Duke of Gloucester scarce himself,...

19

II,3,1097

Ay, good my lord; for purposely therefore
Left I the court, to see this quarrel tried.

20

III,1,1281

Can you not see? or will ye not observe
The strangeness of his alter'd countenance?...

21

III,1,1352

Ah, what's more dangerous than this fond affiance!
Seems he a dove? his feathers are but borrowed,...

22

III,1,1463

But I can give the loser leave to chide.

23

III,1,1479

What, will your highness leave the parliament?

24

III,1,1507

Free lords, cold snow melts with the sun's hot beams.
Henry my lord is cold in great affairs,...

25

III,1,1535

So the poor chicken should be sure of death.

26

III,1,1550

Thrice-noble Suffolk, 'tis resolutely spoke.

27

III,1,1563

And so say I.

28

III,1,1587

Nay, then, this spark will prove a raging fire,
If wind and fuel be brought to feed it with:...

29

III,2,1701

God forbid any malice should prevail,
That faultless may condemn a nobleman!...

30

III,2,1709

Marry, God forfend!

31

III,2,1713

How fares my lord? Help, lords! the king is dead.

32

III,2,1715

Run, go, help, help! O Henry, ope thine eyes!

33

III,2,1718

How fares my gracious lord?

34

III,2,1737

Why do you rate my Lord of Suffolk thus?
Although the duke was enemy to him,...

35

III,2,1754

Be woe for me, more wretched than he is.
What, dost thou turn away and hide thy face?...

36

III,2,1871

Then you, belike, suspect these noblemen
As guilty of Duke Humphrey's timeless death.

37

III,2,1880

Are you the butcher, Suffolk? Where's your knife?
Is Beaufort term'd a kite? Where are his talons?

38

III,2,1890

He dares not calm his contumelious spirit
Nor cease to be an arrogant controller,...

39

III,2,1924

What noise is this?
[Re-enter SUFFOLK and WARWICK, with their]...

40

III,2,1982

O Henry, let me plead for gentle Suffolk!

41

III,2,1994

Mischance and sorrow go along with you!
Heart's discontent and sour affliction...

42

III,2,2001

Fie, coward woman and soft-hearted wretch!
Hast thou not spirit to curse thine enemy?

43

III,2,2023

Enough, sweet Suffolk; thou torment'st thyself;
And these dread curses, like the sun 'gainst glass,...

44

III,2,2033

O, let me entreat thee cease. Give me thy hand,
That I may dew it with my mournful tears;...

45

III,2,2062

Wither goes Vaux so fast? what news, I prithee?

46

III,2,2074

Go tell this heavy message to the king.
[Exit VAUX]...

47

III,2,2099

Away! though parting be a fretful corrosive,
It is applied to a deathful wound....

48

III,2,2105

And take my heart with thee.

49

III,2,2110

This way for me.

50

IV,4,2523

Oft have I heard that grief softens the mind,
And makes it fearful and degenerate;...

51

IV,4,2537

Ah, barbarous villains! hath this lovely face
Ruled, like a wandering planet, over me,...

52

IV,4,2547

No, my love, I should not mourn, but die for thee.

53

IV,4,2564

Ah, were the Duke of Suffolk now alive,
These Kentish rebels would be soon appeased!

54

IV,4,2580

My hope is gone, now Suffolk is deceased.

55

V,1,3068

For thousand Yorks he shall not hide his head,
But boldly stand and front him to his face.

56

V,1,3098

Call hither Clifford! bid him come amain,
To say if that the bastard boys of York...

57

V,1,3111

And here comes Clifford to deny their bail.

58

V,1,3125

He is arrested, but will not obey;
His sons, he says, shall give their words for him.

59

V,1,3181

A subtle traitor needs no sophister.

60

V,2,3295

Away, my lord! you are slow; for shame, away!

61

V,2,3297

What are you made of? you'll nor fight nor fly:
Now is it manhood, wisdom and defence,...

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