Speeches (Lines) for Mamillius
in "Winter's Tale"

Total: 13

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,196

Leontes. [Aside]. Too hot, too hot!
To mingle friendship far is mingling bloods.
I have tremor cordis on me: my heart dances;
But not for joy; not joy. This entertainment
May a free face put on, derive a liberty
From heartiness, from bounty, fertile bosom,
And well become the agent; 't may, I grant;
But to be paddling palms and pinching fingers,
As now they are, and making practised smiles,
As in a looking-glass, and then to sigh, as 'twere
The mort o' the deer; O, that is entertainment
My bosom likes not, nor my brows! Mamillius,
Art thou my boy?

Mamillius. Ay, my good lord.


2

I,2,206

Leontes. I' fecks!
Why, that's my bawcock. What, hast
smutch'd thy nose?
They say it is a copy out of mine. Come, captain,
We must be neat; not neat, but cleanly, captain:
And yet the steer, the heifer and the calf
Are all call'd neat.—Still virginalling
Upon his palm!—How now, you wanton calf!
Art thou my calf?

Mamillius. Yes, if you will, my lord.


3

I,2,244

Leontes. No, in good earnest.
How sometimes nature will betray its folly,
Its tenderness, and make itself a pastime
To harder bosoms! Looking on the lines
Of my boy's face, methoughts I did recoil
Twenty-three years, and saw myself unbreech'd,
In my green velvet coat, my dagger muzzled,
Lest it should bite its master, and so prove,
As ornaments oft do, too dangerous:
How like, methought, I then was to this kernel,
This squash, this gentleman. Mine honest friend,
Will you take eggs for money?

Mamillius. No, my lord, I'll fight.


4

I,2,299

Leontes. To your own bents dispose you: you'll be found,
Be you beneath the sky.
[Aside]
I am angling now,
Though you perceive me not how I give line.
Go to, go to!
How she holds up the neb, the bill to him!
And arms her with the boldness of a wife
To her allowing husband!
[Exeunt POLIXENES, HERMIONE, and Attendants]
Gone already!
Inch-thick, knee-deep, o'er head and
ears a fork'd one!
Go, play, boy, play: thy mother plays, and I
Play too, but so disgraced a part, whose issue
Will hiss me to my grave: contempt and clamour
Will be my knell. Go, play, boy, play.
There have been,
Or I am much deceived, cuckolds ere now;
And many a man there is, even at this present,
Now while I speak this, holds his wife by the arm,
That little thinks she has been sluiced in's absence
And his pond fish'd by his next neighbour, by
Sir Smile, his neighbour: nay, there's comfort in't
Whiles other men have gates and those gates open'd,
As mine, against their will. Should all despair
That have revolted wives, the tenth of mankind
Would hang themselves. Physic for't there is none;
It is a bawdy planet, that will strike
Where 'tis predominant; and 'tis powerful, think it,
From east, west, north and south: be it concluded,
No barricado for a belly; know't;
It will let in and out the enemy
With bag and baggage: many thousand on's
Have the disease, and feel't not. How now, boy!

Mamillius. I am like you, they say.


5

II,1,601

First Lady. Come, my gracious lord,
Shall I be your playfellow?

Mamillius. No, I'll none of you.


6

II,1,603

First Lady. Why, my sweet lord?

Mamillius. You'll kiss me hard and speak to me as if
I were a baby still. I love you better.


7

II,1,606

Second Lady. And why so, my lord?

Mamillius. Not for because
Your brows are blacker; yet black brows, they say,
Become some women best, so that there be not
Too much hair there, but in a semicircle
Or a half-moon made with a pen.


8

II,1,612

Second Lady. Who taught you this?

Mamillius. I learnt it out of women's faces. Pray now
What colour are your eyebrows?


9

II,1,615

First Lady. Blue, my lord.

Mamillius. Nay, that's a mock: I have seen a lady's nose
That has been blue, but not her eyebrows.


10

II,1,627

Hermione. What wisdom stirs amongst you? Come, sir, now
I am for you again: pray you, sit by us,
And tell 's a tale.

Mamillius. Merry or sad shall't be?


11

II,1,629

Hermione. As merry as you will.

Mamillius. A sad tale's best for winter: I have one
Of sprites and goblins.


12

II,1,634

Hermione. Let's have that, good sir.
Come on, sit down: come on, and do your best
To fright me with your sprites; you're powerful at it.

Mamillius. There was a man—


13

II,1,636

Hermione. Nay, come, sit down; then on.

Mamillius. Dwelt by a churchyard: I will tell it softly;
Yond crickets shall not hear it.


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