Speeches (Lines) for Maria
in "Twelfth Night"

Total: 59

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,3,118

By my troth, Sir Toby, you must come in earlier o'
nights: your cousin, my lady, takes great...

2

I,3,122

Ay, but you must confine yourself within the modest
limits of order.

3

I,3,128

That quaffing and drinking will undo you: I heard
my lady talk of it yesterday; and of a foolish...

4

I,3,132

Ay, he.

5

I,3,134

What's that to the purpose?

6

I,3,136

Ay, but he'll have but a year in all these ducats:
he's a very fool and a prodigal.

7

I,3,142

He hath indeed, almost natural: for besides that
he's a fool, he's a great quarreller: and but that...

8

I,3,149

They that add, moreover, he's drunk nightly in your company.

9

I,3,160

And you too, sir.

10

I,3,165

My name is Mary, sir.

11

I,3,171

Fare you well, gentlemen.

12

I,3,177

Sir, I have not you by the hand.

13

I,3,179

Now, sir, 'thought is free:' I pray you, bring
your hand to the buttery-bar and let it drink.

14

I,3,182

It's dry, sir.

15

I,3,185

A dry jest, sir.

16

I,3,187

Ay, sir, I have them at my fingers' ends: marry,
now I let go your hand, I am barren.

17

I,5,296

Nay, either tell me where thou hast been, or I will
not open my lips so wide as a bristle may enter in...

18

I,5,301

Make that good.

19

I,5,303

A good lenten answer: I can tell thee where that
saying was born, of 'I fear no colours.'

20

I,5,306

In the wars; and that may you be bold to say in your foolery.

21

I,5,309

Yet you will be hanged for being so long absent; or,
to be turned away, is not that as good as a hanging to you?

22

I,5,313

You are resolute, then?

23

I,5,315

That if one break, the other will hold; or, if both
break, your gaskins fall.

24

I,5,320

Peace, you rogue, no more o' that. Here comes my
lady: make your excuse wisely, you were best.

25

I,5,390

Madam, there is at the gate a young gentleman much
desires to speak with you.

26

I,5,393

I know not, madam: 'tis a fair young man, and well attended.

27

I,5,395

Sir Toby, madam, your kinsman.

28

I,5,494

Will you hoist sail, sir? here lies your way.

29

II,3,772

What a caterwauling do you keep here! If my lady
have not called up her steward Malvolio and bid him...

30

II,3,786

For the love o' God, peace!

31

II,3,804

Nay, good Sir Toby.

32

II,3,825

Go shake your ears.

33

II,3,831

Sweet Sir Toby, be patient for tonight: since the
youth of the count's was today with thy lady, she is...

34

II,3,839

Marry, sir, sometimes he is a kind of puritan.

35

II,3,845

The devil a puritan that he is, or any thing
constantly, but a time-pleaser; an affectioned ass,...

36

II,3,854

I will drop in his way some obscure epistles of
love; wherein, by the colour of his beard, the shape...

37

II,3,866

My purpose is, indeed, a horse of that colour.

38

II,3,868

Ass, I doubt not.

39

II,3,870

Sport royal, I warrant you: I know my physic will
work with him. I will plant you two, and let the...

40

II,5,1042

Get ye all three into the box-tree: Malvolio's
coming down this walk: he has been yonder i' the...

41

II,5,1221

Nay, but say true; does it work upon him?

42

II,5,1223

If you will then see the fruits of the sport, mark
his first approach before my lady: he will come to...

43

III,2,1470

If you desire the spleen, and will laugh yourself
into stitches, follow me. Yond gull Malvolio is...

44

III,2,1477

Most villanously; like a pedant that keeps a school
i' the church. I have dogged him, like his...

45

III,4,1551

He's coming, madam; but in very strange manner. He
is, sure, possessed, madam.

46

III,4,1554

No. madam, he does nothing but smile: your
ladyship were best to have some guard about you, if...

47

III,4,1579

How do you, Malvolio?

48

III,4,1581

Why appear you with this ridiculous boldness before my lady?

49

III,4,1638

Lo, how hollow the fiend speaks within him! did not
I tell you? Sir Toby, my lady prays you to have a...

50

III,4,1647

La you, an you speak ill of the devil, how he takes
it at heart! Pray God, he be not bewitched!

51

III,4,1650

Marry, and it shall be done to-morrow morning, if I
live. My lady would not lose him for more than I'll say.

52

III,4,1653

O Lord!

53

III,4,1663

Get him to say his prayers, good Sir Toby, get him to pray.

54

III,4,1665

No, I warrant you, he will not hear of godliness.

55

III,4,1674

Nay, pursue him now, lest the device take air and taint.

56

III,4,1676

The house will be the quieter.

57

III,4,1713

You may have very fit occasion for't: he is now in
some commerce with my lady, and will by and by depart.

58

IV,2,2021

Nay, I prithee, put on this gown and this beard;
make him believe thou art Sir Topas the curate: do...

59

IV,2,2080

Thou mightst have done this without thy beard and
gown: he sees thee not.

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