Speeches (Lines) for Lysander
in "Midsummer Night's Dream"

Total: 50

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,98

You have her father's love, Demetrius;
Let me have Hermia's: do you marry him.

2

I,1,104

I am, my lord, as well derived as he,
As well possess'd; my love is more than his;...

3

I,1,134

How now, my love! why is your cheek so pale?
How chance the roses there do fade so fast?

4

I,1,138

Ay me! for aught that I could ever read,
Could ever hear by tale or history,...

5

I,1,143

Or else misgraffed in respect of years,—

6

I,1,145

Or else it stood upon the choice of friends,—

7

I,1,147

Or, if there were a sympathy in choice,
War, death, or sickness did lay siege to it,...

8

I,1,162

A good persuasion: therefore, hear me, Hermia.
I have a widow aunt, a dowager...

9

I,1,186

Keep promise, love. Look, here comes Helena.

10

I,1,216

Helen, to you our minds we will unfold:
To-morrow night, when Phoebe doth behold...

11

I,1,232

I will, my Hermia.
[Exit HERMIA]...

12

II,2,689

Fair love, you faint with wandering in the wood;
And to speak troth, I have forgot our way:...

13

II,2,695

One turf shall serve as pillow for us both;
One heart, one bed, two bosoms and one troth.

14

II,2,699

O, take the sense, sweet, of my innocence!
Love takes the meaning in love's conference....

15

II,2,716

Amen, amen, to that fair prayer, say I;
And then end life when I end loyalty!...

16

II,2,762

[Awaking] And run through fire I will for thy sweet sake.
Transparent Helena! Nature shows art,...

17

II,2,770

Content with Hermia! No; I do repent
The tedious minutes I with her have spent....

18

II,2,795

She sees not Hermia. Hermia, sleep thou there:
And never mayst thou come Lysander near!...

19

III,2,1160

Why should you think that I should woo in scorn?
Scorn and derision never come in tears:...

20

III,2,1172

I had no judgment when to her I swore.

21

III,2,1174

Demetrius loves her, and he loves not you.

22

III,2,1200

You are unkind, Demetrius; be not so;
For you love Hermia; this you know I know:...

23

III,2,1212

Helen, it is not so.

24

III,2,1224

Why should he stay, whom love doth press to go?

25

III,2,1226

Lysander's love, that would not let him bide,
Fair Helena, who more engilds the night...

26

III,2,1285

Stay, gentle Helena; hear my excuse:
My love, my life my soul, fair Helena!

27

III,2,1290

Thou canst compel no more than she entreat:
Thy threats have no more strength than her weak prayers....

28

III,2,1296

If thou say so, withdraw, and prove it too.

29

III,2,1299

Away, you Ethiope!

30

III,2,1303

Hang off, thou cat, thou burr! vile thing, let loose,
Or I will shake thee from me like a serpent!

31

III,2,1307

Thy love! out, tawny Tartar, out!
Out, loathed medicine! hated potion, hence!

32

III,2,1311

Demetrius, I will keep my word with thee.

33

III,2,1314

What, should I hurt her, strike her, kill her dead?
Although I hate her, I'll not harm her so.

34

III,2,1324

Ay, by my life;
And never did desire to see thee more....

35

III,2,1371

Be not afraid; she shall not harm thee, Helena.

36

III,2,1379

Get you gone, you dwarf;
You minimus, of hindering knot-grass made;...

37

III,2,1388

Now she holds me not;
Now follow, if thou darest, to try whose right,...

38

III,2,1460

Where art thou, proud Demetrius? speak thou now.

39

III,2,1462

I will be with thee straight.

40

III,2,1479

He goes before me and still dares me on:
When I come where he calls, then he is gone....

41

IV,1,1698

Pardon, my lord.

42

IV,1,1704

My lord, I shall reply amazedly,
Half sleep, half waking: but as yet, I swear,...

43

IV,1,1758

And he did bid us follow to the temple.

44

V,1,1862

More than to us
Wait in your royal walks, your board, your bed!

45

V,1,1962

He hath rid his prologue like a rough colt; he knows
not the stop. A good moral, my lord: it is not...

46

V,1,2073

This lion is a very fox for his valour.

47

V,1,2095

Proceed, Moon.

48

V,1,2111

And so the lion vanished.

49

V,1,2154

Less than an ace, man; for he is dead; he is nothing.

50

V,1,2167

She hath spied him already with those sweet eyes.

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