Speeches (Lines) for Lucetta
in "Two Gentlemen of Verona"

Total: 48

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,153

Ay, madam, so you stumble not unheedfully.

2

I,2,157

Please you repeat their names, I'll show my mind
According to my shallow simple skill.

3

I,2,160

As of a knight well-spoken, neat and fine;
But, were I you, he never should be mine.

4

I,2,163

Well of his wealth; but of himself, so so.

5

I,2,165

Lord, Lord! to see what folly reigns in us!

6

I,2,167

Pardon, dear madam: 'tis a passing shame
That I, unworthy body as I am,
Should censure thus on lovely gentlemen.

7

I,2,171

Then thus: of many good I think him best.

8

I,2,173

I have no other, but a woman's reason;
I think him so because I think him so.

9

I,2,176

Ay, if you thought your love not cast away.

10

I,2,178

Yet he, of all the rest, I think, best loves ye.

11

I,2,180

Fire that's closest kept burns most of all.

12

I,2,182

O, they love least that let men know their love.

13

I,2,184

Peruse this paper, madam.

14

I,2,186

That the contents will show.

15

I,2,188

Valentine's page; and sent, I think, from Proteus.
He would have given it you; but I, being in the way,
Did in your name receive it: pardon the
fault I pray.

16

I,2,198

To plead for love deserves more fee than hate.

17

I,2,200

That you may ruminate.

18

I,2,220

What would your ladyship?

19

I,2,222

I would it were,
That you might kill your stomach on your meat
And not upon your maid.

20

I,2,226

Nothing.

21

I,2,228

To take a paper up that I let fall.

22

I,2,230

Nothing concerning me.

23

I,2,232

Madam, it will not lie where it concerns
Unless it have a false interpeter.

24

I,2,235

That I might sing it, madam, to a tune.
Give me a note: your ladyship can set.

25

I,2,239

It is too heavy for so light a tune.

26

I,2,241

Ay, and melodious were it, would you sing it.

27

I,2,243

I cannot reach so high.

28

I,2,245

Keep tune there still, so you will sing it out:
And yet methinks I do not like this tune.

29

I,2,248

No, madam; it is too sharp.

30

I,2,250

Nay, now you are too flat
And mar the concord with too harsh a descant:
There wanteth but a mean to fill your song.

31

I,2,254

Indeed, I bid the base for Proteus.

32

I,2,260

She makes it strange; but she would be best pleased
To be so anger'd with another letter.

33

I,2,290

Madam,
Dinner is ready, and your father stays.

34

I,2,293

What, shall these papers lie like tell-tales here?

35

I,2,295

Nay, I was taken up for laying them down:
Yet here they shall not lie, for catching cold.

36

I,2,298

Ay, madam, you may say what sights you see;
I see things too, although you judge I wink.

37

II,7,983

Alas, the way is wearisome and long!

38

II,7,989

Better forbear till Proteus make return.

39

II,7,996

I do not seek to quench your love's hot fire,
But qualify the fire's extreme rage,
Lest it should burn above the bounds of reason.

40

II,7,1014

But in what habit will you go along?

41

II,7,1019

Why, then, your ladyship must cut your hair.

42

II,7,1024

What fashion, madam shall I make your breeches?

43

II,7,1028

You must needs have them with a codpiece, madam.

44

II,7,1030

A round hose, madam, now's not worth a pin,
Unless you have a codpiece to stick pins on.

45

II,7,1037

If you think so, then stay at home and go not.

46

II,7,1039

Then never dream on infamy, but go.
If Proteus like your journey when you come,
No matter who's displeased when you are gone:
I fear me, he will scarce be pleased withal.

47

II,7,1047

All these are servants to deceitful men.

48

II,7,1054

Pray heaven he prove so, when you come to him!

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