Speeches (Lines) for Lorenzo
in "Merchant of Venice"

Total: 47

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,74

My Lord Bassanio, since you have found Antonio,
We two will leave you: but at dinner-time,...

2

I,1,111

Well, we will leave you then till dinner-time:
I must be one of these same dumb wise men,...

3

II,4,800

Nay, we will slink away in supper-time,
Disguise us at my lodging and return,...

4

II,4,807

'Tis now but four o'clock: we have two hours
To furnish us....

5

II,4,813

I know the hand: in faith, 'tis a fair hand;
And whiter than the paper it writ on...

6

II,4,818

Whither goest thou?

7

II,4,821

Hold here, take this: tell gentle Jessica
I will not fail her; speak it privately....

8

II,4,829

Meet me and Gratiano
At Gratiano's lodging some hour hence.

9

II,4,834

I must needs tell thee all. She hath directed
How I shall take her from her father's house,...

10

II,6,931

Sweet friends, your patience for my long abode;
Not I, but my affairs, have made you wait:...

11

II,6,939

Lorenzo, and thy love.

12

II,6,943

Heaven and thy thoughts are witness that thou art.

13

II,6,951

Descend, for you must be my torchbearer.

14

II,6,956

So are you, sweet,
Even in the lovely garnish of a boy....

15

II,6,965

Beshrew me but I love her heartily;
For she is wise, if I can judge of her,...

16

III,2,1598

I thank your honour. For my part, my lord,
My purpose was not to have seen you here;...

17

III,4,1750

Madam, although I speak it in your presence,
You have a noble and a true conceit...

18

III,4,1785

Madam, with all my heart;
I shall obey you in all fair commands.

19

III,4,1791

Fair thoughts and happy hours attend on you!

20

III,5,1867

I shall grow jealous of you shortly, Launcelot, if
you thus get my wife into corners.

21

III,5,1875

I shall answer that better to the commonwealth than
you can the getting up of the negro's belly: the...

22

III,5,1881

How every fool can play upon the word! I think the
best grace of wit will shortly turn into silence,...

23

III,5,1886

Goodly Lord, what a wit-snapper are you! then bid
them prepare dinner.

24

III,5,1889

Will you cover then, sir?

25

III,5,1891

Yet more quarrelling with occasion! Wilt thou show
the whole wealth of thy wit in an instant? I pray...

26

III,5,1901

O dear discretion, how his words are suited!
The fool hath planted in his memory...

27

III,5,1920

Even such a husband
Hast thou of me as she is for a wife.

28

III,5,1923

I will anon: first, let us go to dinner.

29

III,5,1925

No, pray thee, let it serve for table-talk;
I shall digest it.

30

V,1,2444

The moon shines bright: in such a night as this,
When the sweet wind did gently kiss the trees...

31

V,1,2454

In such a night
Stood Dido with a willow in her hand...

32

V,1,2461

In such a night
Did Jessica steal from the wealthy Jew...

33

V,1,2469

In such a night
Did pretty Jessica, like a little shrew,...

34

V,1,2475

Who comes so fast in silence of the night?

35

V,1,2477

A friend! what friend? your name, I pray you, friend?

36

V,1,2483

Who comes with her?

37

V,1,2486

He is not, nor we have not heard from him.
But go we in, I pray thee, Jessica,...

38

V,1,2492

Who calls?

39

V,1,2495

Leave hollaing, man: here.

40

V,1,2497

Here.

41

V,1,2502

Sweet soul, let's in, and there expect their coming.
And yet no matter: why should we go in?...

42

V,1,2526

The reason is, your spirits are attentive:
For do but note a wild and wanton herd,...

43

V,1,2569

That is the voice,
Or I am much deceived, of Portia.

44

V,1,2573

Dear lady, welcome home.

45

V,1,2577

Madam, they are not yet;
But there is come a messenger before,...

46

V,1,2585

Your husband is at hand; I hear his trumpet:
We are no tell-tales, madam; fear you not.

47

V,1,2766

Fair ladies, you drop manna in the way
Of starved people.

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