Speeches (Lines) for Lord Hastings
in "Richard III"

Total: 47

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,129

Good time of day unto my gracious lord!

2

I,1,133

With patience, noble lord, as prisoners must:
But I shall live, my lord, to give them thanks...

3

I,1,139

More pity that the eagle should be mew'd,
While kites and buzzards prey at liberty.

4

I,1,142

No news so bad abroad as this at home;
The King is sickly, weak and melancholy,...

5

I,1,150

He is.

6

I,3,647

O, 'twas the foulest deed to slay that babe,
And the most merciless that e'er was heard of!

7

I,3,714

False-boding woman, end thy frantic curse,
Lest to thy harm thou move our patience.

8

I,3,772

My hair doth stand on end to hear her curses.

9

II,1,1131

So thrive I, as I truly swear the like!

10

II,1,1136

So prosper I, as I swear perfect love!

11

II,1,1148

And so swear I, my lord

12

II,2,1413

And so say I.

13

III,1,1594

On what occasion, God he knows, not I,
The queen your mother, and your brother York,...

14

III,1,1627

I go, my lord.

15

III,2,1780

[Within] Who knocks at the door?

16

III,2,1783

What is't o'clock?

17

III,2,1785

Cannot thy master sleep these tedious nights?

18

III,2,1788

And then?

19

III,2,1798

Go, fellow, go, return unto thy lord;
Bid him not fear the separated councils...

20

III,2,1817

Good morrow, Catesby; you are early stirring
What news, what news, in this our tottering state?

21

III,2,1822

How! wear the garland! dost thou mean the crown?

22

III,2,1824

I'll have this crown of mine cut from my shoulders
Ere I will see the crown so foul misplaced....

23

III,2,1832

Indeed, I am no mourner for that news,
Because they have been still mine enemies:...

24

III,2,1838

But I shall laugh at this a twelve-month hence,
That they who brought me in my master's hate...

25

III,2,1843

Ere a fortnight make me elder,
I'll send some packing that yet think not on it.

26

III,2,1847

O monstrous, monstrous! and so falls it out
With Rivers, Vaughan, Grey: and so 'twill do...

27

III,2,1855

I know they do; and I have well deserved it.
[Enter STANLEY]...

28

III,2,1862

My lord,
I hold my life as dear as you do yours;...

29

III,2,1875

Come, come, have with you. Wot you what, my lord?
To-day the lords you talk of are beheaded.

30

III,2,1881

Go on before; I'll talk with this good fellow.
[Exeunt STANLEY and CATESBY]...

31

III,2,1885

I tell thee, man, 'tis better with me now
Than when I met thee last where now we meet:...

32

III,2,1893

Gramercy, fellow: there, drink that for me.

33

III,2,1899

I thank thee, good Sir John, with all my heart.
I am in your debt for your last exercise;...

34

III,2,1907

Good faith, and when I met this holy man,
Those men you talk of came into my mind....

35

III,2,1912

'Tis like enough, for I stay dinner there.

36

III,2,1915

I'll wait upon your lordship.

37

III,4,1948

My lords, at once: the cause why we are met
Is, to determine of the coronation....

38

III,4,1962

I thank his grace, I know he loves me well;
But, for his purpose in the coronation....

39

III,4,1980

I thank your grace.

40

III,4,2004

His grace looks cheerfully and smooth to-day;
There's some conceit or other likes him well,...

41

III,4,2012

Marry, that with no man here he is offended;
For, were he, he had shown it in his looks.

42

III,4,2020

The tender love I bear your grace, my lord,
Makes me most forward in this noble presence...

43

III,4,2030

If they have done this thing, my gracious lord—

44

III,4,2038

Woe, woe for England! not a whit for me;
For I, too fond, might have prevented this....

45

III,4,2054

O momentary grace of mortal men,
Which we more hunt for than the grace of God!...

46

III,4,2061

O bloody Richard! miserable England!
I prophesy the fearful'st time to thee...

47

V,3,3635

[To KING RICHARD III]
Bloody and guilty, guiltily awake,...

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